References of "Devogelaer, JP"
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See detailStrontium ranelate improves osteoarthritis symptoms compared to placebo in patients with knee OA: The SEKOIA study
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Richette, P; Bellamy, N et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013, April), 24(Suppl.1), 49-51

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See detailTreatment of osteoporosis in men.
Kaufman, JM; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Boonen, S et al

in BONE (2013), 53(1), 134-44

SUMMARY: Aspects of osteoporosis in men, such as screening and identification strategies, definitions of diagnosis and intervention thresholds, and treatment options (both approved and in the pipeline ... [more ▼]

SUMMARY: Aspects of osteoporosis in men, such as screening and identification strategies, definitions of diagnosis and intervention thresholds, and treatment options (both approved and in the pipeline) are discussed. INTRODUCTION: Awareness of osteoporosis in men is improving, although it remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. A European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) workshop was convened to discuss osteoporosis in men and to provide a report by a panel of experts (the authors). METHODS: A debate with an expert panel on preselected topics was conducted. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Although additional fracture data are needed to endorse the clinical care of osteoporosis in men, consensus views were reached on diagnostic criteria and intervention thresholds. Empirical data in men display similarities with data acquired in women, despite pathophysiological differences, which may not be clinically relevant. Men should receive treatment at a similar 10-year fracture probability as in women. The design of mixed studies may reduce the lag between comparable treatments for osteoporosis in women becoming available in men. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Strontium ranelate on knee osteoarthritis pain : a responder analysis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Chapurlat, R; Bellamy, N et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2012), 64(S10), 110

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See detailMaintenance of antifracture efficacy over 10 years with strontium ranelate in postmenopausal osteoporosis.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Kaufman, J. M.; Goemaere, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012), 23

In an open-label extension study, BMD increased continuously with strontium ranelate over 10 years in osteoporotic women (P < 0.01). Vertebral and nonvertebral fracture incidence was lower between 5 and ... [more ▼]

In an open-label extension study, BMD increased continuously with strontium ranelate over 10 years in osteoporotic women (P < 0.01). Vertebral and nonvertebral fracture incidence was lower between 5 and 10 years than in a matched placebo group over 5 years (P < 0.05). Strontium ranelate's antifracture efficacy appears to be maintained long term. INTRODUCTION: Strontium ranelate has proven efficacy against vertebral and nonvertebral fractures, including hip, over 5 years in postmenopausal osteoporosis. We explored long-term efficacy and safety of strontium ranelate over 10 years. METHODS: Postmenopausal osteoporotic women participating in the double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 studies SOTI and TROPOS to 5 years were invited to enter a 5-year open-label extension, during which they received strontium ranelate 2 g/day (n = 237, 10-year population). Bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture incidence were recorded, and FRAX(R) scores were calculated. The effect of strontium ranelate on fracture incidence was evaluated by comparison with a FRAX(R)-matched placebo group identified in the TROPOS placebo arm. RESULTS: The patients in the 10-year population had baseline characteristics comparable to those of the total SOTI/TROPOS population. Over 10 years, lumbar BMD increased continuously and significantly (P < 0.01 versus previous year) with 34.5 +/- 20.2% relative change from baseline to 10 years. The incidence of vertebral and nonvertebral fracture with strontium ranelate in the 10-year population in years 6 to 10 was comparable to the incidence between years 0 and 5, but was significantly lower than the incidence observed in the FRAX(R)-matched placebo group over 5 years (P < 0.05); relative risk reductions for vertebral and nonvertebral fractures were 35% and 38%, respectively. Strontium ranelate was safe and well tolerated over 10 years. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term treatment with strontium ranelate is associated with sustained increases in BMD over 10 years, with a good safety profile. Our results also support the maintenance of antifracture efficacy over 10 years with strontium ranelate. [less ▲]

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See detailBisphosphonates and glucocorticoid osteoporosis in men: results of a randomized controlled trial comparing zoledronic acid with risedronate.
Sambrook, P. N.; Roux, C.; Devogelaer, J. P. et al

in BONE (2012), 50

BACKGROUND: We studied 265 men (mean age 56.4years; range 18-83years), among patients enrolled in two arms of a double-blind, 1-year study comparing the effects of zoledronic acid (ZOL) with risedronate ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: We studied 265 men (mean age 56.4years; range 18-83years), among patients enrolled in two arms of a double-blind, 1-year study comparing the effects of zoledronic acid (ZOL) with risedronate (RIS) in patients either commencing (prednisolone 7.5mg/day or equivalent) (prevention arm, n=88) or continuing glucocorticoid therapy (treatment arm, n=177). METHODS: Patients received either a single ZOL 5mg infusion or RIS 5mg oral daily at randomization, along with calcium (1000mg) and vitamin D (400-1200IU). Primary endpoint: difference in percentage change from baseline in bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine (LS) at 12months. Secondary endpoints: percentage changes in BMD at total hip (TH) and femoral neck (FN), relative changes in bone turnover markers (beta-CTx and P1NP), and overall safety. FINDINGS: In the treatment subpopulation, ZOL increased LS BMD by 4.7% vs. 3.3% for RIS and at TH the percentage changes were 1.8% vs. 0.2%, respectively. In the prevention subpopulation, bone loss was prevented by both treatments. At LS the percentage changes were 2.5% vs. -0.2% for ZOL vs. RIS and at TH the percentage changes were 1.1% vs. -0.4%, respectively. ZOL significantly increased lumbar spine BMD more than RIS at Month 12 in both the prevention population (p=0.0024) and the treatment subpopulation (p=0.0232) in men. In the treatment subpopulation, ZOL demonstrated a significantly greater reduction in serum beta-CTx and P1NP relative to RIS at all time-points. In the prevention subpopulation, ZOL significantly reduced beta-CTx at all time-points, and P1NP at Month 3 (p=0.0297) only. Both treatments were well tolerated in men, albeit with a higher incidence of influenza-like illness and pyrexia events post-infusion with ZOL. INTERPRETATION: Once-yearly ZOL preserves or increases BMD within 1year to a greater extent than daily RIS in men receiving glucocorticoid therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailMaintenance of antifracture efficacy over 10 years with strontium ranelate in postmenopausal osteoporosis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Kaufman, J. M.; Devogelaer, J. P. et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2011), 63(S10), 436

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See detailA FRAX(R) model for the assessment of fracture probability in Belgium.
Johansson, H.; Kanis, J. A.; McCloskey, E. V. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22(2), 453-61

A country-specific FRAX(R) model was developed from the epidemiology of fracture and death in Belgium. Fracture probabilities were identified that corresponded to currently accepted reimbursement ... [more ▼]

A country-specific FRAX(R) model was developed from the epidemiology of fracture and death in Belgium. Fracture probabilities were identified that corresponded to currently accepted reimbursement thresholds. INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to evaluate a Belgian version of the WHO fracture risk assessment (FRAX(R)) tool to compute 10-year probabilities of osteoporotic fracture in men and women. A particular aim was to determine fracture probabilities that corresponded to the reimbursement policy for the management of osteoporosis in Belgium and the clinical scenarios that gave equivalent fracture probabilities. METHODS: Fracture probabilities were computed from published data on the fracture and death hazards in Belgium. Probabilities took account of age, sex, the presence of clinical risk factors and femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD). Fracture probabilities were determined that were equivalent to intervention (reimbursement) thresholds currently used in Belgium. RESULTS: Fracture probability increased with age, lower BMI, decreasing BMD T-score and all clinical risk factors used alone or combined. The 10-year probabilities of a major osteoporosis-related fracture that corresponded to current reimbursement guidelines ranged from approximately 7.5% at the age of 50 years to 26% at the age of 80 years where a prior fragility fracture was used as an intervention threshold. For women at the threshold of osteoporosis (femoral neck T-score = -2.5 SD), the respective probabilities ranged from 7.4% to 15%. Several combinations of risk-factor profiles were identified that gave similar or higher fracture probabilities than those currently accepted for reimbursement in Belgium. CONCLUSIONS: The FRAX(R) tool has been used to identify possible thresholds for therapeutic intervention in Belgium, based on equivalence of risk with current guidelines. The FRAX(R) model supports a shift from the current DXA-based intervention strategy, towards a strategy based on fracture probability of a major osteoporotic fracture that in turn may improve identification of patients at increased fracture risk. The approach will need to be supported by health economic analyses. [less ▲]

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See detailEffectiveness of zoledronic acid in the prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis in men and premenopausal women
Saag, k; Roux, C.; Devogelaer, J. P. et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2010, October), 62(10), 902-903

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See detailBisphosphonates and glucocorticoid osteoporosis in men : results of a randomized controlled trial comparing zoledronic acid with risedronate
Sambrook, P. N.; Roux, C.; Devogelaer, J. P. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2010, May), 21(Suppl.1), 19

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See detailEvidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis: a consensus document by the Belgian Bone Club.
Body, J. J.; Bergmann, P.; Boonen, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2010), 21(10), 1657-80

Several drugs are available for the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. This may, in daily practice, confuse the clinician. This manuscript offers an evidence-based update of previous treatment ... [more ▼]

Several drugs are available for the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. This may, in daily practice, confuse the clinician. This manuscript offers an evidence-based update of previous treatment guidelines, with a critical assessment of the currently available efficacy data on all new chemical entities which were granted a marketing authorization. Osteoporosis is widely recognized as a major public health concern. The availability of new therapeutic agents makes clinical decision-making in osteoporosis more complex. Nation-specific guidelines are needed to take into consideration the specificities of each and every health care environment. The present manuscript is the result of a National Consensus, based on a systematic review and a critical appraisal of the currently available literature. It offers an evidence-based update of previous treatment guidelines, with the aim of providing clinicians with an unbiased assessment of osteoporosis treatment effect. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of zoledronic acid (single 5 mg infusion) on lumbar spine bone mineral density versus oral risedronate (5 mg/day) over one year in subgroups of patients receiving glucocorticoid therapy
Roux, C.; Reid, D.; Devogelaer, J. P. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2008), 19(S2), 248-249

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See detailRelationship between bone mineral density changes and fracture risk reduction in patients treated with strontium ranelate
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Roux, C.; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (2007), 92(8), 3076-3081

Objective: Our objective was to analyze the relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) changes and fracture incidence during 3-yr treatment with strontium ranelate. Patients: Women from the strontium ... [more ▼]

Objective: Our objective was to analyze the relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) changes and fracture incidence during 3-yr treatment with strontium ranelate. Patients: Women from the strontium ranelate arm of the Spinal Osteoporosis Therapeutic Intervention study and the TReatment Of Peripheral OSteoporosis study were evaluated. Outcome Measures: The outcome measures included BMD at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total proximal femur assessed at baseline and after a follow-up of 1 and 3 yr; semiquantitative visual assessment of vertebral fractures; and nonvertebral fractures based on written documentation. Results: After 3 yr of strontium ranelate treatment, each percentage point increase in femoral neck and total proximal femur BMD was associated with a 3%(95% adjusted confidence interval, 1-5%) and2% (1-4%) reduction in risk of a new vertebral fracture, respectively. The 3- yr changes in femoral neck and total proximal femur BMD explained 76% and 74%, respectively, of the reduction in vertebral fractures observed during the treatment. Three-year changes in spine BMD were not statistically associated with the incidence of new vertebral fracture (P = 0.10). No significant associations were found between 3- yr changes in BMD and incidence of new nonvertebral fractures, but a trend was found for femoral neck BMD (P = 0.09) and for total proximal femur BMD (P = 0.07). An increase in femoral neck BMD after 1 yr was significantly associated with the reduction in incidence of new vertebral fractures observed after 3 yr (P = 0.04). Conclusion: During 3-yr strontium ranelate treatment, an increase in femoral neck BMD was associated with a proportional reduction in vertebral fracture incidence. [less ▲]

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See detailDual energy X-ray absorptiometry-based assessment of male patients using standardized bone density values and a national reference database
Goemaere, S.; Vanderschueren, D.; Kaufman, J. M. et al

in Journal of Clinical Densitometry (2007), 10(1, JAN-MAR), 25-33

Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements from different manufacturers provide different bone mineral density (BMD) values and derived T-scores and Z-scores. These differences result partly from ... [more ▼]

Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements from different manufacturers provide different bone mineral density (BMD) values and derived T-scores and Z-scores. These differences result partly from technical differences in the algorithms for the determination of bone mineral content and bone area and partly from the use of different manufacturer-derived reference databases. The present study was to implement a uniforrn expression of BNID in all male patients by using standardized BMD (sBMD) values and referring to a newly established national male reference sample. In 8 bone densitometry centers throughout Belgium 229 young healthy men were measured on Hologic (Bedford, MA) or GE-Lunar (Madison, WI) bone densitometers. Quality control procedures were implemented and site cross-calibration performed using the European Spine Phantom. Absolute BMD values were converted to standardized values by validated formulas (sBMD). Clinically acceptable between-center differences were noted. No discrepancy was observed in terms of mean sBMD and standard deviations at the lumbar spine and proximal femur between the Belgian and the US reference populations. Region-specific sBMD thresholds for the diagnosis of male osteoporosis were calculated. The current data provide a basis to implement a nation-wide, uniform expression of BMD in male patients and allow harmonization of the BMD-based diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in men. [less ▲]

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See detailRaloxifene reduces fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Devogelaer, J. P.

in Clinical Orthopaedics & Related Research (2006), 443

Recently, selective estrogen receptor modulators have been developed for the management of osteoporosis based on antiosteoclastic properties similar to that of estrogens but with a safety profile ... [more ▼]

Recently, selective estrogen receptor modulators have been developed for the management of osteoporosis based on antiosteoclastic properties similar to that of estrogens but with a safety profile including potential benefits on the breast, heart, and cognitive function. Raloxifene, the first selective estrogen receptor modulator to be marketed for the treatment of osteoporosis has shown reduction in spinal fracture risk in patients with low bone mineral density with (48%) or without (35%) prevalent vertebral fracture. Raloxifene also reduces nonvertebral fractures in high risk patients (47%). The decrease in Type I procollagen N-terminal propeptide at 1 year accounts for 28% of the total reduction in vertebral fracture risk. Raloxifene reduced the risk of estrogen receptor-positive invasive breast cancer by 84%. Among subjects with increased cardiovascular risk at baseline, those assigned to raloxifene had a 40% decrease in the risk of cardiovascular events compared with placebo. The definite anti-fracture efficacy of raloxifene at the spine, its plausible effect on non-spine fracture in high-risk patients and its beneficial effect on breast and heart make this compound an interesting approach for women presenting with osteoporosis. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic study, level II (lesser quality randomized controlled trial [eg, < 80% followup, no blinding, or improper randomization]). See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of the levels of evidence. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence-based guidelines for the prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis: a consensus document of the Belgian Bone Club
Devogelaer, J. P.; Goemaere, S.; Boonen, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2006), 17(1), 8-19

Glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently prescribed for various inflammatory and/or life-threatening conditions concerning many systems in the body. However, they can provoke many aftereffects, of which ... [more ▼]

Glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently prescribed for various inflammatory and/or life-threatening conditions concerning many systems in the body. However, they can provoke many aftereffects, of which osteoporosis (OP) is one of the most crippling complications, with its host of fractures. The dramatic increase in bone fragility is mainly attributable to the GC-induced rapid bone loss in all skeletal compartments. We have reviewed the meta-analyses and randomized controlled studies reporting medical therapeutic interventions currently registered in Belgium for the management of GC-OP comparatively with a placebo. Based on this research, an expert meeting developed a consensus on the prevention and therapy of GC-OP. The pathophysiology of GC-OP is complex. Several factors, acting separately or synergistically, have been described. Their great number could help to understand the rapidity of bone loss and of bone fragility occurrence, indicating that a rapid therapeutic intervention should be implemented to avoid complications. All patients on GCs are threatened with OP, so the prevention and/or therapy of GC-OP should be considered not only for postmenopausal females, but also for osteopenic premenopausal females and for males put on a daily dose of at least 7.5 mg equivalent prednisolone that is expected to last at least 3 months. Non-pharmacological interventions, such as exercise and avoidance of tobacco and alcohol, should be recommended, even if their role is not definitely settled in GC-OP prevention. Supplemental calcium and vitamin D should be considered as the first-line therapy because of the decrease in intestinal calcium absorption provoked by GCs. They also could be considered either as isolated therapy in patients taking less than 7.5 mg prednisolone daily and/or for a predicted period shorter than 3 months or as adjuvant therapy to other more potent drugs. Hormone replacement therapy could be considered in young postmenopausal females on GC, such as in postmenopausal OP, or in men with low androgen levels. Calcitonin appears to have a protective effect on trabecular bone in GC-OP, just as in postmenopausal OP. There is an increasing body of evidence supporting the antifracture efficacy of bisphosphonates, notably alendronate and risedronate. Preventative and curative therapy of GC-OP should be maintained as long as the patient is on GC treatment and could be stopped after weaning from GC, because there is more than circumstantial evidence of some recovery of BMD when GCs are stopped. There is no indication in GC-OP for any combination of two antiresorptive agents (except for calcium and vitamin D) or for an antiresorptive and an anabolic agent. There is indeed no proof that the increased costs of combined treatments will translate into increased therapeutic efficacy. [less ▲]

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See detailStrontium ranelate reduces the risk of nonvertebral fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: Treatment of Peripheral Osteoporosis (TROPOS) study
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Seeman, E.; De Vernejoul, M. C. et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (2005), 90(5), 2816-2822

Background: Strontium ranelate, a new oral drug shown to reduce vertebral fracture risk in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, was studied in the Treatment of Peripheral Osteoporosis (TROPOS) study to ... [more ▼]

Background: Strontium ranelate, a new oral drug shown to reduce vertebral fracture risk in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, was studied in the Treatment of Peripheral Osteoporosis (TROPOS) study to assess its efficacy and safety in preventing nonvertebral fractures also. Methods: Strontium ranelate (2 g/d) or placebo were randomly allocated to 5091 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis in a double-blind placebo-controlled 5-yr study with a main statistical analysis over 3 yr of treatment. Findings: In the entire sample, relative risk (RR) was reduced by 16% for all nonvertebral fractures (P = 0.04), and by 19% for major fragility fractures (hip, wrist, pelvis and sacrum, ribs and sternum, clavicle, humerus) (P = 0.031) in strontium ranelate-treated patients in comparison with the placebo group. Among women at high risk of hip fracture ( age ≥ 74 yr and femoral neck bone mineral density T score ≤-3, corresponding to -2.4 according to NHANES reference) (n = 1977), the RR reduction for hip fracture was 36% (P = 0.046). RR of vertebral fractures was reduced by 39% (P < 0.001) in the 3640 patients with spinal x-rays and by 45% in the subgroup without prevalent vertebral fracture. Strontium ranelate increased bone mineral density throughout the study, reaching at 3 yr (P < 0.001): +8.2% (femoral neck) and +9.8% (total hip). Incidence of adverse events (AEs) was similar in both groups. Conclusion: This study shows that strontium ranelate significantly reduces the risk of all nonvertebral and in a high-risk subgroup, hip fractures over a 3-yr period, and is well tolerated. It confirms that strontium ranelate reduces vertebral fractures. Strontium ranelate offers a safe and effective means of reducing the risk of fracture associated with osteoporosis. [less ▲]

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See detailA dose adjustment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis not optimally responding to a standard dose of infliximab of 3 mg/kg every 8 weeks can be effective: a Belgian prospective study
Durez, P.; Van den Bosch, F.; Corluy, L. et al

in Rheumatology (2005), 44(4), 465-468

Objectives. To analyse the effect of a dose increase in patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with insufficient clinical response to 3 mg/kg infliximab every 8 weeks. Methods. Patients suffering ... [more ▼]

Objectives. To analyse the effect of a dose increase in patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with insufficient clinical response to 3 mg/kg infliximab every 8 weeks. Methods. Patients suffering from active refractory RA despite methotrexate, were treated with i.v. infusions of infliximab (3 mg/kg) on week 0, 2, 6 and every 8 weeks thereafter. Based on the clinical judgement at week 22, patients received a dose increase of 100 mg from week 30 on. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set for disease activity measures was regularly assessed. Results. Five hundred and eleven RA patients were included. At week 22, 61.4, 34 and 14.1% of all patients met ACR 20, ACR 50 and ACR 70 criteria, respectively, and 6.1% of patients were in remission. A low swollen joint count at baseline was correlated with improvement at week 22 for ACR 20 (P < 0.06), ACR 50 (P < 0.06) and ACR 70 (P < 0.005). The change in HAQ score between weeks 0 and 22 was predictive for response at week 54 (P < 0.01). The dose of infliximab was increased by 100 mg in 22% of the patients. Most baseline values of patients requiring dose increase were higher (P <= 0.001) than the baseline values of the remaining patients. Increasing the dose of infliximab by one vial from week 30 on could circumvent the partial loss of response in these patients. Conclusion. Infliximab use in this large out-patient cohort resulted in a significant clinical improvement. A subgroup that partially lost response during the first 22 weeks could regain response by adding 100 mg of infliximab to the subsequent doses. Due to the current study design, however, a regression to the mean like effect could not be ruled out. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence-based guidelines for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis: a consensus document of the Belgian Bone Club
Boonen, S.; Body, Jean-Jacques; Boutsen, Y. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005), 16(3), 239-254

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