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See detailSpeciation in Malagasy lemurs: a review of the cryptic diversity in genus Lepilemur
Wilmet, Leslie ULg; Schwitzer, Christoph; Devillers, Pierre et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2014), 18(4), 577-588

Madagascar is one of the highest biodiversity hotspots on the planet; however, it is also one of the most heavily impacted countries in the world in terms of forest degradation and general habitat ... [more ▼]

Madagascar is one of the highest biodiversity hotspots on the planet; however, it is also one of the most heavily impacted countries in the world in terms of forest degradation and general habitat destruction. Genus Lepilemur, in family Lepilemuridae, is a genus of small, nocturnal, exclusively arboreal Malagasy folivores. All species in the genus have small ranges of distribution. Fully forest-dependent, they have a high risk of extinction. Various models and theories of speciation mechanisms have been developed for the fauna and flora of Madagascar. For instance, in the northwestern part of the island, some authors used Lepilemur spp. to test two existing models of distribution: the “Martin model” and “Wilmé model”. Regarding the impact of forest destruction and habitat degradation in Madagascar, conservation strategies for Lepilemur need to be put in place. This paper gives an overview of the current knowledge of the genus Lepilemur and examines speciation for Malagasy lemurs. The understanding of species distribution within biodiversity hotspots is important to identify target for conservation. Therefore, we summarize and compare three biogeography models related to lemurs distribution in order to understand the reasons behind the high diversity (26 species in total) among the genus Lepilemur. Particular attention is also given to the concept of species regarding biodiversity issues and the taxonomic explosion in genus Lepilemur. [less ▲]

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See detailDiet and foraging ecology of Roseate terns and lesser noddies breeding sympatrically on Aride Island, Seychelles
Monticelli, David; Ramos, J. A.; Tavares, P. C. et al

in Waterbirds (2008), 31(239), 248

Inferences on seabird ecology from stable isotopes ratios (δ13C, δ15N) and mercury concentrations analysis of feathers have been made for temperate and polar species but are far more rare for tropical ... [more ▼]

Inferences on seabird ecology from stable isotopes ratios (δ13C, δ15N) and mercury concentrations analysis of feathers have been made for temperate and polar species but are far more rare for tropical species. In this paper, we used this approach combined with analysis of regurgitations and feeding observations at colonies to examine diet segregation between Roseate Terns (Sterna dougallii) and Lesser Noddies (Anous tenuirostris) breeding sympatrically on Aride Island (Seychelles), western Indian Ocean. Our results indicated extensive overlap between the two species in trophic level and foraging area during the breeding season. Goatfish predominated (93-97%) in all diet samples of adults and chicks collected in the colonies, except in prey fed to mates by Roseate Terns, of which scad and tuna comprised 20%. The isotopic analyses of feathers replaced by adults during molt (primary and body feathers) suggested, however, that the two species differ in foraging ecology during the nonbreeding period. Roseate Tern adults had consistently lower δ15N values than Lesser Noddies which, in turn, had δ15N values comparable to those of chick feathers grown on Aride. Moreover, low but similar mercury levels were found in body feathers of Lesser Noddy adults and Roseate Tern chicks, whereas Roseate Tern adults were significantly more contaminated. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that the Lesser Noddy is largely sedentary, being associated with the same food web in the vicinity of the colonies year-round. In contrast, Roseate Terns rely on distinct prey during the molting (nonbreeding) season which may be also consistent with a change in food web (i.e., a migratory regime) although the assignment of potential wintering areas remain difficult without isotopic basemaps currently available for the Indian Ocean. [less ▲]

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See detailSurveillance de l'état de l'environnement wallon par bioindicateurs.
Marchal, Didier; Dufrêne, Marc ULg; Lebrun, Philippe et al

in Cahiers des Réserves Naturelles (1992), 1

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See detailUn projet de surveillance de l'état de l'environnement par bio-indicateurs
Devillers, Pierre; Beudels, Roseline; Devillers-Terschuren, Jean et al

in Les Naturalistes Belges (1990), 71(3 spécial Orchidées), 75-98

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