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See detailField data on the little known and endangered Lepilemur mittermeieri
Wilmet, Leslie ULg; Schwitzer, Christoph; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline C. et al

in Journal of Primatology (2015), 4(2),

Lepilemur mittermeieri is a very little known sportive lemur of the Ampasindava peninsula of Madagascar, presently regarded as endangered. On the basis of genetic material only, obtained from three ... [more ▼]

Lepilemur mittermeieri is a very little known sportive lemur of the Ampasindava peninsula of Madagascar, presently regarded as endangered. On the basis of genetic material only, obtained from three individuals collected at the same locality. No observation confidently allocated to the species has been reported since. The objectives of our research were to verify that the sportive lemurs found in forests of the Ampasindava peninsula beyond the type-locality of Lepilemur mittermeieri belonged to the same species as the type, to provide morphological and behavioural data for populations confidently attributed to L. mittermeieri and to obtain for these populations preliminary evaluations of density variations within the peninsula. Our surveys were undertaken in March and April 2014 in remnant forest patches of the western part of the Ampasindava peninsula. Linear transects by night and punctual observations by day were conducted. A total of 54 animals were seen along nine transects situated in four forest patches, two at low altitude and two at high altitude. All animals examined and photographed appeared similar, and the impression was gained that a single taxon was involved. Genetic material collected from one dead specimen proved identical to the type of L. mittermeieri which confirmed the identity of the populations we observed. It thus appears that L. mittermeieri is indeed the only sportive lemur present on the peninsula and that it occurs in several forest remnants. We endeavoured to get evaluations of the density and abundance of the species in the four forest patches we studied. We used KAIs (Kilometric Abundance Indices) to evaluate and compare relative densities, and Buckland’s distance sampling method to evaluate absolute densities. The latter suggested a density of 1.9 animals/ha, a result that must, however, be taken with caution. [less ▲]

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See detailHabitat use of the endangered Lepilemur mittermeieri - Northwest Madagascar
Wilmet, Leslie ULg; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline C et al

Conference (2015, August)

Genus Lepilemur is exemplary of the endemic mammalian fauna of the island of Madagascar. Sportive lemurs have small distribution ranges, and fairly small total populations and are particularly negatively ... [more ▼]

Genus Lepilemur is exemplary of the endemic mammalian fauna of the island of Madagascar. Sportive lemurs have small distribution ranges, and fairly small total populations and are particularly negatively affected by deforestation and habitat fragmentation. Our research focus on a poorly-known taxon, Lepilemur mittermeieri, whose distribution range is located on the Ampasindava peninsula in the northwest Madagascar. It has been described in 2006 on the basis of genetic material only. Since then, no further research has been conducted and general information of this endangered species is urgently requested. We will present our global project as well as the results of a second field mission conducted from March to June 2015 in order to specifically 1) investigate habitat use of 8 radio-collared Lepilemur mittermeieri by the analysis of their home range, feeding ecology and sleeping sites characteristics and 2) to complete forest characterization of the home range of each radio-collared animal. This study is conducted on the Ampasindava peninsula, a priority area for Malagasy conservation. [less ▲]

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See detailLe Parc National Sahamalaza - Iles Radama serait-il l’ultime refuge pour certaines espèces de lémuriens du nord-ouest de Madagascar ?
Wilmet, Leslie ULg; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline C.; Schwitzer, Christoph et al

in Tropicultura (2015)

Depuis des millions d’années, la faune et la flore terrestre de Madagascar ont évolué dans un espace isolé. Suite à cette situation, le niveau d’endémisme y est très élevé et l’ensemble de l’île ... [more ▼]

Depuis des millions d’années, la faune et la flore terrestre de Madagascar ont évolué dans un espace isolé. Suite à cette situation, le niveau d’endémisme y est très élevé et l’ensemble de l’île représente un des plus importants hotspot de biodiversité. Madagascar fait aussi partie des pays les plus touchés en termes de destruction des habitats naturels ; 90 % de la végétation d’origine est aujourd’hui perdue. La déforestation et la fragmentation des habitats forestiers menace particulièrement les primates de l’île, les lémuriens. L’île est considérée par de nombreuses organisations internationales comme une priorité pour la conservation de la nature, autant dans le domaine zoologique que botanique. Les premières aires protégées de Madagascar ont été établies en 1927 et l’île en compte aujourd’hui 47. Cet article reprend l’historique et fait l’état des lieux du parc national Sahamalaza-Ile Radama, situé au nord-ouest de Madagascar. Nous nous intéressons spécifiquement à deux espèces de lémuriens emblématiques du parc ; Eulemur flavifrons et Lepilemur sahamalazensis ainsi qu’aux menaces qui pèsent sur leur écosystème. Différentes mesures ont été proposées dans le cadre d’un Plan d’Action de Conservation afin d’en améliorer la gestion et assurer la survie de ces espèces. [less ▲]

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See detailSpeciation in Malagasy lemurs: a review of the cryptic diversity in genus Lepilemur
Wilmet, Leslie ULg; Schwitzer, Christoph; Devillers, Pierre et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2014), 18(4), 577-588

Madagascar is one of the highest biodiversity hotspots on the planet; however, it is also one of the most heavily impacted countries in the world in terms of forest degradation and general habitat ... [more ▼]

Madagascar is one of the highest biodiversity hotspots on the planet; however, it is also one of the most heavily impacted countries in the world in terms of forest degradation and general habitat destruction. Genus Lepilemur, in family Lepilemuridae, is a genus of small, nocturnal, exclusively arboreal Malagasy folivores. All species in the genus have small ranges of distribution. Fully forest-dependent, they have a high risk of extinction. Various models and theories of speciation mechanisms have been developed for the fauna and flora of Madagascar. For instance, in the northwestern part of the island, some authors used Lepilemur spp. to test two existing models of distribution: the “Martin model” and “Wilmé model”. Regarding the impact of forest destruction and habitat degradation in Madagascar, conservation strategies for Lepilemur need to be put in place. This paper gives an overview of the current knowledge of the genus Lepilemur and examines speciation for Malagasy lemurs. The understanding of species distribution within biodiversity hotspots is important to identify target for conservation. Therefore, we summarize and compare three biogeography models related to lemurs distribution in order to understand the reasons behind the high diversity (26 species in total) among the genus Lepilemur. Particular attention is also given to the concept of species regarding biodiversity issues and the taxonomic explosion in genus Lepilemur. [less ▲]

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See detailDiet and foraging ecology of Roseate terns and lesser noddies breeding sympatrically on Aride Island, Seychelles
Monticelli, David; Ramos, J. A.; Tavares, P. C. et al

in Waterbirds (2008), 31(239), 248

Inferences on seabird ecology from stable isotopes ratios (δ13C, δ15N) and mercury concentrations analysis of feathers have been made for temperate and polar species but are far more rare for tropical ... [more ▼]

Inferences on seabird ecology from stable isotopes ratios (δ13C, δ15N) and mercury concentrations analysis of feathers have been made for temperate and polar species but are far more rare for tropical species. In this paper, we used this approach combined with analysis of regurgitations and feeding observations at colonies to examine diet segregation between Roseate Terns (Sterna dougallii) and Lesser Noddies (Anous tenuirostris) breeding sympatrically on Aride Island (Seychelles), western Indian Ocean. Our results indicated extensive overlap between the two species in trophic level and foraging area during the breeding season. Goatfish predominated (93-97%) in all diet samples of adults and chicks collected in the colonies, except in prey fed to mates by Roseate Terns, of which scad and tuna comprised 20%. The isotopic analyses of feathers replaced by adults during molt (primary and body feathers) suggested, however, that the two species differ in foraging ecology during the nonbreeding period. Roseate Tern adults had consistently lower δ15N values than Lesser Noddies which, in turn, had δ15N values comparable to those of chick feathers grown on Aride. Moreover, low but similar mercury levels were found in body feathers of Lesser Noddy adults and Roseate Tern chicks, whereas Roseate Tern adults were significantly more contaminated. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that the Lesser Noddy is largely sedentary, being associated with the same food web in the vicinity of the colonies year-round. In contrast, Roseate Terns rely on distinct prey during the molting (nonbreeding) season which may be also consistent with a change in food web (i.e., a migratory regime) although the assignment of potential wintering areas remain difficult without isotopic basemaps currently available for the Indian Ocean. [less ▲]

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See detailSurveillance de l'état de l'environnement wallon par bioindicateurs.
Marchal, Didier; Dufrêne, Marc ULg; Lebrun, Philippe et al

in Cahiers des Réserves Naturelles (1992), 1

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See detailUn projet de surveillance de l'état de l'environnement par bio-indicateurs
Devillers, Pierre; Beudels, Roseline; Devillers-Terschuren, Jean et al

in Les Naturalistes Belges (1990), 71(3 spécial Orchidées), 75-98

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)