References of "Deville, Christelle"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStudy on the effects of laminarin, a polysaccharide from seaweed, on gut characteristics
Deville, Christelle ULg; Gharbi, Myriam ULg; Dandrifosse, Guy ULg et al

in Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture (2007), 87(9), 1717-1725

This study investigates whether laminarin (beta 1-3,beta 1-6-glucan), a polysaccharide from seaweed, exhibits beneficial properties for human health by analysing its effects on intestinal parameters ... [more ▼]

This study investigates whether laminarin (beta 1-3,beta 1-6-glucan), a polysaccharide from seaweed, exhibits beneficial properties for human health by analysing its effects on intestinal parameters. Anaerobic batch culture fermenters were used for the screening of the in vitro utilization of laminarin by the human gut microflora through the monitoring of biochemical and microbiological parameters. Additionally, the influence of laminarin ingestion on the composition of intestinal mucus (neutral mucins, sialomucins and sulphomucins) was studied in rats. Laminarin was almost totally (more than 90% used) fermented after 24 h of incubation with human intestinal bacteria. It was not selectively used by bifidobacteria and lactobacilli, but increased the production of propionate and butyrate. Variations of mucus composition were observed in jejunum, ileum, caecum and colon, both in lumen content and in intestinal wall, of rats after ingestion of this polysaccharide. Due to its effects on mucus composition, laminarin could influence the adherence and the translocation of bacteria across the epithelial wall. In conclusion, laminarin seems to be a modulator of the intestinal metabolism by its effects on mucus composition, intestinal pH and short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production, especially butyrate. (c) 2007 Society of Chemical Industry. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 157 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDevelopment of a serum-free co-culture of human intestinal epithelium cell-lines (Caco-2/HT29-5M21)
Nollevaux, Géraldine; Deville, Christelle ULg; Elmoualij, Benaïssa ULg et al

in BMC Cell Biology (2006), 7

Background: The absorptive and goblet cells are the main cellular types encountered in the intestine epithelium. The cell lineage Caco-2 is a model commonly used to reproduce the features of the bowel ... [more ▼]

Background: The absorptive and goblet cells are the main cellular types encountered in the intestine epithelium. The cell lineage Caco-2 is a model commonly used to reproduce the features of the bowel epithelium. However, there is a strong debate regarding the value of Caco-2 cell culture to mimick in vivo situation. Indeed, some authors report in Caco-2 a low paracellular permeability and an ease of access of highly diffusible small molecules to the microvilli, due to an almost complete lack of mucus. The HT29-5M21 intestinal cell lineage is a mucin-secreting cellular population. A co-culture system carried out in a serum-free medium and comprising both Caco-2 and HT29-5M21 cells was developed. The systematic use of a co-culture system requires the characterization of the monolayer under a given experimental procedure. Results: In this study, we investigated the activity and localization of the alkaline phosphatase and the expression of IAP and MUC5AC genes to determine a correlation between these markers and the cellular composition of a differentiated monolayer obtained from a mixture of Caco-2 and HT29-5M21 cells. We observed that the culture conditions used ( serum-free medium) did not change the phenotype of each cell type, and produced a reproducible model. The alkaline phosphatase expression characterizing Caco-2 cells was influenced by the presence of HT29-5M21 cells. Conclusion: The culture formed by 75% Caco-2 and 25% HT29-5M21 produce a monolayer containing the two main cell types of human intestinal epithelium and characterized by a reduced permeability to macromolecules. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModulation of intestinal urea cycle by dietary spermine in suckling rat
Gharbi, Myriam ULg; Powroznik, Brigitte; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel ULg et al

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (2005), 336(4), 1119-1124

Argininosuccinate synthetase, an ubiquitous enzyme in mammals, catalyses the formation of argininosuccinate, the precursor of arginine. Arginine is recognised as an essential amino acid in foetuses and ... [more ▼]

Argininosuccinate synthetase, an ubiquitous enzyme in mammals, catalyses the formation of argininosuccinate, the precursor of arginine. Arginine is recognised as an essential amino acid in foetuses and neonates, but also as a conditionally essential amino acid in adults. Argininosuccinate synthetase is initially expressed in enterocytes during the developmental period, it disappeared from this organ then appeared in the kidneys. Although the importance of both intestinal and renal argininosuccinate synthetases has been recognised for a long time, nutrients have not yet been identified as inducers of the gene expression. In the context of a proteomic screening of intestinal modifications induced by dietary spermine in suckling rats, we showed that argininosuccinate synthetase and carbamoyl phosphate synthase disappeared from enterocytes after this treatment. The disappearance of argininosuccinate synthetase in small intestine was confirmed by immunodetection. Expression of carbamoyl phosphate synthase and argininosuccinate synthetase coding genes decreased also after spermine administration. Expression of other urea cycle enzyme coding genes was modulated by spermine administration: argininosuccinate lyase decreased and arginase increased. Our results fit with the developmental variation of argininosuccinate synthetase and carbamoyl phosphate synthase. Modulation of the gene expression for several urea cycle enzymes suggests a coordination between all the pathway steps and switch toward polyamine (or proline and glutamate) biosynthesis from ornithine. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLaminarin in the dietary fibre concept
Deville, Christelle ULg; Damas, Jacques ULg; Forget, Pierre et al

in Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture (2004), 84(9), 1030-1038

Dietary fibres consist of edible plant polysaccharides that are resistant to digestion and absorption in the human small intestine but undergo complete or partial fermentation in the colon. Seaweeds ... [more ▼]

Dietary fibres consist of edible plant polysaccharides that are resistant to digestion and absorption in the human small intestine but undergo complete or partial fermentation in the colon. Seaweeds, notably Laminaria spp, are particularly rich in polysaccharides resistant to hydrolysis in the upper gastrointestinal tract and are, in consequence, considered as dietary fibres. Most of the carbohydrates from Laminaria spp are thought to be indigestible by humans. The main storage polysaccharide of these algae is laminarin, a beta-polymer of glucose. The aims of this work were, on the one hand, to compare various methods of extraction of laminarin by partial characterisation of the product obtained and, on the other hand, to study the fate of this polysaccharide and its effects in the gastrointestinal tract in order to determine its potential as a dietary fibre in human nutrition. Among four methods tested to extract laminarin, the best appeared to be a hot HCl-based method. Human digestive enzymes did not hydrolyse laminarin, so this polysaccharide can be considered as a dietary fibre. After ingestion by rats, this polysaccharide was not found in faeces of these animals. It did not increase the intestinal transit and stool output in vivo, but it increased the contractile response of the stomach to acetylcholine in vitro. (C) 2004 Society of Chemical Industry. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPolyamines in gut inflammation and allergy
Peulen, Olivier ULg; Deloyer, Patricia; Deville, Christelle ULg et al

in Current Medicinal Chemistry - Anti-Inflammatory & Anti-Allergy Agents (2004), 3

The natural polyamines, named 1,4-diaminobutane, N-aminopropyl-1,4-diaminobutane and N,N'-bisaminopropyl- 1,4-diaminobutane, are also designated respectively as putrescine, spermidine and spermine. They ... [more ▼]

The natural polyamines, named 1,4-diaminobutane, N-aminopropyl-1,4-diaminobutane and N,N'-bisaminopropyl- 1,4-diaminobutane, are also designated respectively as putrescine, spermidine and spermine. They are polycationic compounds found in all eukaryotic cells. As they are deeply involved in cell functions, e.g. cellular growth, their concentration and their equilibrium in the intracellular pool are maintained in very narrow limits by regulatory mechanisms acting in a very fast, sensitive and precise way. These compounds are involved in gut inflammatory processes and in allergy. Indeed, they control the production of inflammatory mediators in several cell lines or tissues. Polyamine metabolism could be considered as a putative target for inflammation, allergy prevention or therapy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (7 ULg)