References of "Dethier, Marie"
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See detailEmotional Facial Expression Recognition and Expressivity in Type I and Type II Alcohol Dependent Patients
Dethier, Marie ULg; El Hawa, Maya; Duchateau et al

in Journal of Nonverbal Behavior (2014), 38(1), 89-105

Objective: Alcohol dependent patients (ADs) are known to encounter severe interpersonal problems. Nonverbal communication skills are important for the development of healthy relationships. The present ... [more ▼]

Objective: Alcohol dependent patients (ADs) are known to encounter severe interpersonal problems. Nonverbal communication skills are important for the development of healthy relationships. The present study aimed to explore emotional facial expression (EFE) recognition and posed and spontaneous EFE expressivity in male ADs divided into two groups according to Cloninger’s typology and the impact of their interpersonal relationship quality on the potential nonverbal deficits. Method: Twenty type I ADs, twenty-one type II ADs, and twenty control participants took part in an EFE recognition task and an EFE expressivity task that considered personal emotional events (spontaneous expressivity) and EFE in response to a photo or word cue (posed expressivity). Coding was based on judges’ ratings of participants’ emotional facial expressions. Participants additionally completed a questionnaire on interpersonal relationship quality. Results: No difference between the three groups emerged in the EFE recognition task. Type II ADs showed heightened deficits compared with type I ADs in EFE expressivity: Judges perceived less accurate posed EFE in response to a cue word and less intense and positive spontaneous EFE in type II ADs compared to control participants. In addition, type II ADs reported more relationship difficulties compared to both type I ADs and control participants. These interpersonal relationship difficulties were related to some of the EFE expressivity deficits of AD-IIs. Conclusions: This study underlines the important differences between the interpersonal functioning of AD subtypes. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentity in schizophrenia: A study of trait self-knowledge
Boulanger, Marie ULg; Dethier, Marie ULg; Gendre, Francis et al

in Psychiatry Research (2013), 209(3), 367-374

Identity results from interlock of two systems which are a set of abstracted representations about oneself and a phenomenological self. Literature highlights identity disturbance in schizophrenia that ... [more ▼]

Identity results from interlock of two systems which are a set of abstracted representations about oneself and a phenomenological self. Literature highlights identity disturbance in schizophrenia that affects each of both systems. In the same vein, the present study investigates the stability and the quality of traits self-knowledge, a component of abstracted representations of self, in schizophrenia patients. Sixty-eight patients with schizophrenia and 68 healthy control subjects completed a short version of a personality scale (LABEL). This scale is composed of two versions (A and B), each comprising 50 adjectives that correspond to synonymous adjectives in the alternate list. Participants indicated how these adjectives described themselves and completed both versions of the scale on two separate occasions, one month apart. The findings showed that schizophrenic patients presented an unstable identity and change in identity quality compared with healthy subjects. However, this identity disturbance was weaker than expected. These results are discussed in a part of autobiographical memory disturbances in schizophrenia, illness duration and the decompensation stage. [less ▲]

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See detailEmotional Response to Body and Facial Feedback in Alcohol-Dependent Patients
Dethier, Marie ULg; Duchateau, Régis; El Hawa, Maya et al

in Alcoologie et Addictologie (2013), 35(2), 117-125

Introduction: The object of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of body postures and facial expressions manipulation on subjective feelings in male alcohol dependent (ADs) divided into two ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The object of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of body postures and facial expressions manipulation on subjective feelings in male alcohol dependent (ADs) divided into two groups according to Cloninger’s typology in order to gain some understanding of their difficulties in the regulation of emotions and in interpersonal relationships. Method: Twenty type I ADs, twenty-one type II ADs, and twenty control participants adopted facial expressions and body postures according to specific instructions and maintained these positions for 10 seconds. Expressions and postures entailed anger, sadness, and happiness as well as a neutral (baseline) condition. After each expression/posture manipulation, participants evaluated their subjective emotional state (including cheerfulness, sadness, and irritation). Results: The three groups reported heightened subjective feelings in concordance with the facial and posture manipulation with no difference emerging between AD and control participants, F(1, 60) = 0.01, p = .91, or between the three groups, F(2, 59) = 1.03, p = .36. Conclusions: Similarly to control participants, ADs from the two subtypes may be responsive to the combined effect of facial and body feedback and could, subsequently, benefit from its regulative effects. [less ▲]

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See detailEmotional regulation impairments following severe traumatic brain injury: an investigation of the body and facial feedback effects
Dethier, Marie ULg; Blairy, Sylvie ULg; Rosenberg, Hannah et al

in Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society (2013), 19(4), 367-379

The object of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of body and facial feedback in adults who had suffered from a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in order to gain some understanding of their ... [more ▼]

The object of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of body and facial feedback in adults who had suffered from a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in order to gain some understanding of their difficulties in the regulation of negative emotions. Twenty-four participants with TBI and 28 control participants adopted facial expressions and body postures according to specific instructions and maintained these positions for 10 seconds. Expressions and postures entailed anger, sadness, and happiness as well as a neutral (baseline) condition. After each expression/posture manipulation, participants evaluated their subjective emotional state (including cheerfulness, sadness, and irritation). TBI participants were globally less responsive to the effects of body and facial feedback than control participants, F (1, 50) = 5.89, p = .02, η2 = .11. More interestingly, the TBI group differed from the Control group across emotions, F (8,400) = 2.51, p = .01, η2 = .05. Specifically, participants with TBI were responsive to happy but not to negative expression/posture manipulations whereas control participants were responsive to happy, angry, and sad expression/posture manipulations. In conclusion, TBI appears to impair the ability to recognise both the physical configuration of a negative emotion and its associated subjective feeling. [less ▲]

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See detailCapacity for Cognitive and Emotional Empathy in Alcohol-Dependent Patients
Dethier, Marie ULg; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

in Psychology of Addictive Behaviors : Journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors (2012), 26(3), 371-383

This study assessed two previously unexplored facets of empathy in alcohol-dependent patients (ADs) divided into two groups according to Cloninger’s alcoholism typology: the attribution of intentions ... [more ▼]

This study assessed two previously unexplored facets of empathy in alcohol-dependent patients (ADs) divided into two groups according to Cloninger’s alcoholism typology: the attribution of intentions according to emotional facial expressions (EFEs) and emotional contagion in reaction to EFEs. Twenty-three male Type-I ADs, 21 male Type-II ADs, and 24 male control participants were compared in two computerized tasks. First, participants rated the extent to which an adjective descriptive of personality weighted on interpersonal dimensions (of rejection, aggressiveness, dominance, and affiliation) corresponded with a video of a neutral EFE that changed to an intense EFE. Second, participants evaluated their own emotional states after watching a series of videos that depicted EFEs while their own face was being filmed. The results showed that Type-I ADs attributed more rejection intentions and fewer affiliation intentions to EFEs compared with controls; however, depression might better explain this biased attribution. Furthermore, AD subtypes showed a different pattern of intention attribution according to the emotions that were portrayed and the sex of the stimulus. In addition, angry EFE mimicry was stronger in Type-II ADs than other participants. Finally, ADs expressed fewer positive emotions and more negative emotions than controls when watching EFEs. These findings emphasize the importance of differentiating alcoholism subtypes and contribute to the understanding of AD interpersonal behaviors. [less ▲]

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See detailSpontaneous and Posed Emotional Facial Expressions Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
Dethier, Marie ULg; Blairy, Sylvie ULg; Rosenberg, Hannah et al

in Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology (2012), 34(9), 936-947

Aim: The current study aimed to test the intensity of spontaneous emotional expressions and the accuracy of posed emotional expressions in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Method: Twenty ... [more ▼]

Aim: The current study aimed to test the intensity of spontaneous emotional expressions and the accuracy of posed emotional expressions in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Method: Twenty-three participants with TBI and 27 matched control participants were asked to relate personal angry, happy, and sad events (spontaneous expressivity) and to pose angry, happy, and sad expressions in response to a photo or word cue (posed expressivity). Their emotional facial expressions were coded via judges’ ratings. Results: Participants with TBI had less intense sad expressions when relating a sad event compared to control participants. No group difference emerged in the happy and angry events, the latter possibly due to differentially low inter-rater reliability for anger ratings. Participants with TBI were impaired in their ability to pose sad emotions. Conclusions: These preliminary findings suggest that patients with TBI are impaired at expressing sad expressions either spontaneously or deliberately. This may reflect difficulties in the initiation or suppression of facial expression as well as an impaired semantic knowledge of the facial configuration of sad expression. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of an anxious social situation on emotional facial expressions (EFEs) recognition in children
Dethier, Marie ULg; Taskin, Aslihan Serap; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

in Revue Francophone de Clinique Comportementale et Cognitive (2012), 17(2), 2-9

This study addresses the relationship between the capacity of emotional facial expressions (EFEs) recognition and self-esteem in children placed in an anxious social situation. Seventy children (8 – 12 ... [more ▼]

This study addresses the relationship between the capacity of emotional facial expressions (EFEs) recognition and self-esteem in children placed in an anxious social situation. Seventy children (8 – 12 years) were placed in an anxious social situation of performance in which they were instructed to count aloud backwards, beginning at 200 in decrements of 13. After that, children were assessed on a decoding test of 16 photographs depicting EFE. For each photograph, they evaluated the presence of nine types of emotions. They also completed the Self-Perception Profile for Children (Pierrehumbert et al., 1987). No correlations emerged between the accuracy of EFE recognition and an increase of anxious feelings after the anxious social situation. However, self-esteem was correlated with performance on the EFE recognition test. Moreover, the lower the child’s level of self-esteem was, the more he/she perceived negative emotions in EFEs. In conclusion, social anxiety doesn’t seem to interfere with EFEs recognition performance in an anxious social situation. However, low level of self-esteem in children appears to be associated with deficits and interpretative bias in EFEs recognition in an anxious social situation. [less ▲]

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See detailCapacity for Cognitive and Emotional Empathy in Alcohol-Dependent Patients
Dethier, Marie ULg; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

Conference (2011, October 28)

This study assessed two facets of empathy never explored before in male alcohol-dependent patients (ADs) divided into two groups according to Cloninger’s typology of alcoholism: the attribution of ... [more ▼]

This study assessed two facets of empathy never explored before in male alcohol-dependent patients (ADs) divided into two groups according to Cloninger’s typology of alcoholism: the attribution of intentions according to emotional facial expressions (EFEs) and emotional contagion in reaction to EFEs. Twenty three type I ADs, 21 type II ADs, and 24 controls were compared in two computerized tasks. First, the participants had to rate to what extent an adjective descriptive of personality weighted on the interpersonal dimensions of rejection, aggressiveness, dominance, and affiliation corresponded to a film changing from a neutral EFE to an intense EFE. Second, they had to evaluate their own emotional state after watching a series of films depicting EFEs while their own face was being filmed. The results showed that ADs attributed more intentions of rejection and fewer intentions of affiliation to EFEs of men compared to male controls and that this biased attribution was largely due to depression. Furthermore, AD subtypes showed a different pattern of intention attribution according to the emotions portrayed and according to the sex of the stimulus. In addition, the mimicry of angry EFEs was stronger in type II ADs than in other participants. Finally, ADs expressed fewer positive emotions and more negative emotions than controls when watching EFEs. Our findings outline the importance of differentiation in terms of alcoholism subtype, and contribute to the understanding of the interpersonal behaviors of ADs. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive and Emotional Empathy in Alcohol-Dependent Patients (ADs): a Review of the Literature
Dethier, Marie ULg; Douws, Laetitia; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

in Revue Francophone de Clinique Comportementale et Cognitive (2011), 16(2), 56-69

The purpose of this article is to assert the current state of the scientific literature on the issues regarding empathy in alcohol-dependents patients (ADs). We will first explain what the term « empathy ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this article is to assert the current state of the scientific literature on the issues regarding empathy in alcohol-dependents patients (ADs). We will first explain what the term « empathy » covers and the distinction made between cognitive and emotional empathy. We will describe then the different studies that got interested in the capacities for empathy in ADs patients. These studies concern predominantly one precise aspect of cognitive empathy: the capacity to infer an emotional state on the basis of emotional facial expressions (EFEs). Up to now, the other domain of cognitive empathy –the decoding of affective prosody and of nonverbal mulimodal stimuli and the attribution of intentions and beliefs– and emotional empathy are under-investigated in alcohol-dependence. In this review of the literature, we will identify the consequences that empathy problems could have on interpersonal relationships as well as the domains that still have to be to investigate regarding empathy in ADs patients, and notably the remediation of these deficits. [less ▲]

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See detailMarital Satisfaction in Couples with an Alcoholic Husband
Dethier, Marie ULg; Counerotte, Christelle; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

in Journal of Family Violence (2011), 26

Both members of 15 heterosexual couples with an alcoholic husband (AC) and of 15 matched couples with healthy members (HC) filled out first, the Marital Adjustment Test (Locke & Wallace, 1959), second ... [more ▼]

Both members of 15 heterosexual couples with an alcoholic husband (AC) and of 15 matched couples with healthy members (HC) filled out first, the Marital Adjustment Test (Locke & Wallace, 1959), second, the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (Coopersmith, 1967), and finally, a questionnaire on emotional feeling state in which the participant had to evaluate his or her own emotions and the emotions experienced by his or her partner. Results showed that both AC members reported lower marital satisfaction and a lower level of self-esteem than HC members. Furthermore, they were less congruent with their partner regarding the evaluation of their partner’s emotional feeling states (EFS). These deficits could have repercussions on marital happiness, which itself would have repercussions on the alcoholic’s treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailEmotional facial expressions decoding in siblings of children with autism
Dethier, Marie ULg; Sojic, Barbara ULg; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

Poster (2010, October 08)

The ability to identify other people’s emotions, including their emotional facial expression (EFE), is fundamental to many social processes. Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) show deficits ... [more ▼]

The ability to identify other people’s emotions, including their emotional facial expression (EFE), is fundamental to many social processes. Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) show deficits in several empathy-related processes, including EFE decoding (e.g. Ashwin, Chapman, Colle, & Baron-Cohen, 2007). The object of this study was to investigate the capacity to decode accurately EFE in siblings of children with ASD. Indeed, autism is considered to be substantially influenced by genetic factors and relatives of ASD individuals present different type of deficits including the domains of language, theory of mind, and executive functioning (e.g., Fombonne, Bolton, Prior, Jordan, & Rutter, 1997). Fifteen 6-to-15 years old siblings of children with ASD were compared to matched siblings of typically developing children on a decoding task of adults EFE. The children had to match a story depicting an adult in an emotional situation to a picture of an adult EFE. The emotions investigated were joy, anger, sadness, fear, surprise, disgust, and contempt. The differences of EFE accuracy between siblings of ASD and siblings of typically developing children are discussed in reference to the characteristics of the relationship with their ASD brother or sister. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of an anxious social situation on emotional facial expressions (EFE) recognition in children
Dethier, Marie ULg; Taskin, Asliane; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

Poster (2010, June 04)

Socially anxious children have difficulties to interact adequately with others. The core characteristic of social anxiety, the fear of being negatively evaluated by others, may among others, be based on ... [more ▼]

Socially anxious children have difficulties to interact adequately with others. The core characteristic of social anxiety, the fear of being negatively evaluated by others, may among others, be based on problems with the decoding of other persons’ emotional facial expression (EFE). Up to now, the research on EFE recognition in socially anxious children has produced mixed results. Whereas some studies reported differences between anxious and healthy children in EFE recognition (e.g., Simonian, Beidel, Turner, Berkes, & Long, 2001), others didn’t find such differences (Melfsen & Florin, 2002). In this study, we addressed two new issues in the investigation of EFE recognition in socially anxious children. Firstly, we investigated self-esteem. Socially anxious children show low confidence in one’s cognitive and social abilities. Furthermore, high self-esteem is related to high capacities of EFE recognition (Garfield, Rogoff, & Steinberg, 1987), and more generally to high level of social functioning (Serretti et al., 1999 ; Shapira et al., 1999). Indeed, the perception of ourselves depends on the way we think others people perceive us. Secondly, past researches have investigated this issue in low anxious situations and thus, not in situations in which social anxious individuals feel threatened. The originality of the present study is that it addresses the relationship between EFE recognition performance and self-esteem in children placed in an anxious social situation. We predicted a low capacity to decode EFE in socially anxious children. Moreover, we hypothesised a relationship between a low self-esteem and difficulties to decode accurately EFE in an anxious social situation. Seventy children (8 – 12 years) were placed in an anxious social situation of performance in which they were instructed to count aloud backwards, beginning at 200 in increments of 13. Children assessed their emotional feeling state, including their degree of anxiety, before and after the anxious social situation. Furthermore, children were assessed on an EFE decoding test consisting of 16 photographs depicting EFE of happiness, anger, disgust, and sadness. For each photograph, they evaluated the presence of nine types of emotions on a 7-point Likert scale. They also completed the Self-Perception Profile for Children (Harter, 1985). No correlations emerged between the accuracy of EFE recognition and an increase of anxious feelings after the anxious social situation. However, self-esteem was correlated with performance on the EFE recognition test, r (70) = -.33, p < .01. Moreover, the lower the child’s level of self-esteem was, the more he/she perceived negative emotions (fear, anger, disgust, and shame) in EFE of anger. In conclusion, social anxiety doesn’t seem to interfere with EFE recognition performance in an anxious social situation. However, low level of self-esteem in children appears to be associated with deficits and interpretative bias in EFE recognition in an anxious social situation. The recognition of the expression of anger, an emotion socially threatening, seems particularly biased in children with low level of self-esteem. [less ▲]

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See detailCapacities of cognitive and emotional empathy in relationship to interpersonal difficulties in alcohol dependant patients (AD)
Dethier, Marie ULg; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

Poster (2010, June 04)

The term empathy refers to two related human abilities: mental perspective taking (cognitive empathy) and the vicarious sharing of emotions (emotional empathy). The main object of this study was to ... [more ▼]

The term empathy refers to two related human abilities: mental perspective taking (cognitive empathy) and the vicarious sharing of emotions (emotional empathy). The main object of this study was to explore the relationship between capacities of both aspects of empathy and their relationships with interpersonal difficulties in alcohol-dependant patients (AD). The research in alcoholism empathy has focalised around one aspect of cognitive empathy - the capacity to infer an emotional state-, and that essentially on the basis of emotional facial expression (EFE) recognition. However, researchers have shown little interest in the investigation of the other aspects of cognitive empathy. The present study focuses on the capacity to infer interpersonal intentions and on emotional empathy. As documented by the research on EFE decoding, AD patients show deficits in cognitive empathy. In this study, we investigated their capacity to infer interpersonal intentions in social situation. We hypothesized that AD patients compared to healthy individuals and to depressed patients will attributed more intentions of reject and of aggressiveness to other people on the basis of their EFE. In this study, emotional empathy was defined as the modulation of the emotional feeling state of the participant in function of the EFE display by other people. We hypothesized that the modulation in AD patient will be different from the one of healthy people in function of the Cloninger subtype of alcoholism (Cloninger, Bohman, Sigvardsson, 1987). This emotional reactivity will be more important in Type II alcoholism and less important in Type I alcoholism. As Mimicry facilitates feelings of empathy in healthy people, it was also investigated. Twenty type I AD patients, 20 type II AD patients, 20 depressed patients, and 20 healthy subjects participated to the study. The alcoholism subtype identification was maid according to the criteria from von Knorring, Bohman, von Knorring, and Oreland (1985). The participant completed questionnaires assessing the quality of interpersonal relationships, their usual quantity of alcohol consumption, and, for AD patients, their level of alcohol dependence. Their capacity to recognise faces was evaluated by the Benton facial recognition test. The empathy tasks were computerized. In the cognitive empathy task, the participants had to evaluate the adequacy (in a 7-point Likert scale) between a film of a face changing from a neutral EFE to an emotional EFE (the photographs come from the material of Matsumoto & Ekman, 1988) and an adjective descriptive of personality. Each adjective was weighted on the interpersonal dimensions of reject, aggressiveness, dominance, and affiliation. In the emotional empathy task, the participants had to evaluate their own emotional feeling state (in a 7-point Likert scale; from very negative to very positive) after watching a series of films depicting emotional faces (same material as before). During this task, the participant’s face was filmed in order to assess mimicry. The differences of empathy capacities between AD patients and control participants (depressed and healthy) are discussed in reference to the characteristics of their interpersonal relationship. [less ▲]

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See detailAlcoolisme et attribution d’intentions interpersonnelles sur base d’expressions faciales émotionnelles : Etude pilote
Dethier, Marie ULg; Volkova, Alessia; Neumann, Aurore et al

in Revue Francophone de Clinique Comportementale et Cognitive (2010), 15(3), 1-7

The ability to understand the emotional states of others is necessary in order to develop high quality interpersonal relationships. Alcohol-dependents (AD) display interpretative errors when decoding ... [more ▼]

The ability to understand the emotional states of others is necessary in order to develop high quality interpersonal relationships. Alcohol-dependents (AD) display interpretative errors when decoding emotional facial expressions (EFE). EFE communicate information not only regarding emotional states but also regarding interpersonal intentions. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether, exposed to EFE, AD differ from healthy individuals in attributions of interpersonal intentions of dominance and affiliation. The purpose of dominance is to control the environment and the purpose of affiliation is to maintain the relationship with the object. In the present study, twenty AD and 20 healthy subjects attributed intentions of dominance and affiliation to 12 faces portraying joy, anger or sadness. Results revealed that AD differ from healthy individual in attribution of dominance but not of affiliation. AD make mistakes when decoding expressed emotions. The present study suggests that, compared to healthy subjects, they also tend to anticipate, in a biased way, interpersonal intentions. [less ▲]

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See detailMarital satisfaction in couples with an alcoholic member
Dethier, Marie ULg; Counerotte, Christelle; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

Poster (2009, October 23)

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See detailMarital satisfaction and emotional communication in couples with an alcoholic member
Dethier, Marie ULg; Counerotte, Christelle; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

Poster (2009, September 18)

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