References of "Desseilles, Martin"
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See detailSleep and Movement Disorders: Neuroimaging Aspects
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Ratti, Pietro-Luca et al

in Chokroverty, Sudhansu; Montagna, Pasquale; Allen, Richard (Eds.) et al Sleep and Movement Disorders (in press)

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See detailLe « trouble » de l’éjaculation précoce : Le critère d’une minute maximum de pénétration en question
Kempeneers, Philippe ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg

in Sexologies : Revue Européenne de Santé Sexuelle = European Journal of Sexual Health (2014), 23

The current trend is to reserve the diagnosis of premature ejaculation (PE) for cases where penetration lasts for about one minute or less. The rationale is that the aetiology is primarily bio ... [more ▼]

The current trend is to reserve the diagnosis of premature ejaculation (PE) for cases where penetration lasts for about one minute or less. The rationale is that the aetiology is primarily bio-constitutional, and that long-term pharmacological treatment is the only viable option. However, the literature contains little scientific evidence to support this argument. In fact, a good number of individuals who suffer from overly rapid ejaculation present with penetration duration exceeding one minute, and even severe forms of PE have responded favourably to psycho-sexological treatment. Moreover, although certain biological variables are known to influence ejaculation latency time, nothing indicates that they play an exclusive role of psychosocial etiological factors in severe PE. Therefore, it would be ‘premature’ to base a PE diagnosis on a maximum penetration duration of one minute, which should instead be considered a severity gradient. Given that desired criteria for penetration duration often exceed biological norms, it would be inappropriate to propose that only the most severe forms of PE have constitutional origins. In any case, the constitution is relatively flexible, and can respond to adaptive learning. An adaptive learning approach would undoubtedly be more difficult to apply in severe cases, but not impossible. The issue of whether to use pharmacological versus psycho-sexological treatment could be side-stepped by moving beyond the single criterion of ejaculation latency. [less ▲]

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See detailLe « trouble » de l’éjaculation précoce : Le critère d’une minute maximum de pénétration en question
Kempeneers, Philippe ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg

in Sexologies : Revue Européenne de Santé Sexuelle = European Journal of Sexual Health (2014), 23

The current trend is to reserve the diagnosis of premature ejaculation (PE) for cases where penetration lasts for about one minute or less. The rationale is that the aetiology is primarily bio ... [more ▼]

The current trend is to reserve the diagnosis of premature ejaculation (PE) for cases where penetration lasts for about one minute or less. The rationale is that the aetiology is primarily bio-constitutional, and that long-term pharmacological treatment is the only viable option. However, the literature contains little scientific evidence to support this argument. In fact, a good number of individuals who suffer from overly rapid ejaculation present with penetration duration exceeding one minute, and even severe forms of PE have responded favourably to psycho-sexological treatment. Moreover, although certain biological variables are known to influence ejaculation latency time, nothing indicates that they play an exclusive role of psychosocial etiological factors in severe PE. Therefore, it would be ‘premature’ to base a PE diagnosis on a maximum penetration duration of one minute, which should instead be considered a severity gradient. Given that desired criteria for penetration duration often exceed biological norms, it would be inappropriate to propose that only the most severe forms of PE have constitutional origins. In any case, the constitution is relatively flexible, and can respond to adaptive learning. An adaptive learning approach would undoubtedly be more difficult to apply in severe cases, but not impossible. The issue of whether to use pharmacological versus psycho-sexological treatment could be side-stepped by moving beyond the single criterion of ejaculation latency. [less ▲]

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See detailThe premature ejaculation ‘disorder ’: Questioning the criterion of one minute of penetration
Kempeneers, Philippe ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg

in Sexologies : Revue Européenne de Santé Sexuelle = European Journal of Sexual Health (2014), 23

The current trend is to reserve the diagnosis of premature ejaculation (PE) for cases where penetration lasts for about one minute or less. The rationale is that the aetiology is primarily bio ... [more ▼]

The current trend is to reserve the diagnosis of premature ejaculation (PE) for cases where penetration lasts for about one minute or less. The rationale is that the aetiology is primarily bio-constitutional, and that long-term pharmacological treatment is the only viable option. However, the literature contains little scientific evidence to support this argument. In fact, a good number of individuals who suffer from overly rapid ejaculation present with penetration duration exceeding one minute, and even severe forms of PE have responded favourably to psycho-sexological treatment. Moreover, although certain biological variables are known to influence ejaculation latency time, nothing indicates that they play an exclusive role of psychosocial etiological factors in severe PE. Therefore, it would be ‘premature’ to base a PE diagnosis on a maximum penetration duration of one minute, which should instead be considered a severity gradient. Given that desired criteria for penetration duration often exceed biological norms, it would be inappropriate to propose that only the most severe forms of PE have constitutional origins. In any case, the constitution is relatively flexible, and can respond to adaptive learning. An adaptive learning approach would undoubtedly be more difficult to apply in severe cases, but not impossible. The issue of whether to use pharmacological versus psycho-sexological treatment could be side-stepped by moving beyond the single criterion of ejaculation latency. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain dead yet mind alive: A positron emission tomography case study of brain metabolism in Cotard’s syndrome
Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2013), 49(7), 1997-1999

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See detailClimate and emotion regulation: is there a role for “climatotherapy” in the sustainable development of mental health ?
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Duclos, Catherine; Flohimont, Valérie et al

in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2013), 36(5), 23-24

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See detailSleep stabilizes visuomotor adaptation memory: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2013), 22(2), 144-54

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See detailNeural Correlates of Performance Variabilty during Motor Sequence Acquisition
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Sterpenich, V.; Vandewalle, Gilles ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2012), 60(1), 324-331

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See detailRisque suicidaire et préférences musicales : y a-t-il un lien ?
Mikolajczak, Gladys ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg

in Santé Mentale au Québec (2012)

Suicidality and musical preferences: a possible link? Music is an important part of young people’s lives. In this article, we attempt to answer two questions on the links between music et sui- cide. First ... [more ▼]

Suicidality and musical preferences: a possible link? Music is an important part of young people’s lives. In this article, we attempt to answer two questions on the links between music et sui- cide. First, we examine if certain types of music favor suicidal process (ideation and acting out); and, secondly, we examine if music can constitute a tool to reduce the risk of suicide. Several factors possibly involved in links between musical preferences and the suicidal process are developed: the Velten effect and the musical mood induction proce- dure, the identification and the learning by imitation, the media influen- ce as well as the individual characteristics. A multifactor approach is necessary to understand the complex and birectional links that unite musical preferences and suicide risk. [less ▲]

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See detailPrédire le suicide ou prédire l’imprévisible dans un monde incertain. Modèle du suicide selon l’apprentissage par renforcement.
Desseilles, Martin ULg

in Santé Mentale au Québec (2012)

Predicting suicide or predicting the unpredictable in an uncertain world: Reinforcement Learning Model-Based analysis In general, it appears that the suicidal act is highly unpredictable with the current ... [more ▼]

Predicting suicide or predicting the unpredictable in an uncertain world: Reinforcement Learning Model-Based analysis In general, it appears that the suicidal act is highly unpredictable with the current scientific means available. In this article, the author submits the hypothesis that predicting suicide is complex because it results in predicting a choice, in itself unpredictable. The article pro- poses a Reinforcement learning model-based analysis. In this model, we integrate on the one hand, four ascending modulatory neurotransmitter systems (acetylcholine, noradrenalin, serotonin, and dopamine) with their regions of respective projections and afferences, and on the other hand, various observations of brain imaging identified until now in the suicidal process. [less ▲]

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See detailSuicide et alimentation : approche biopsychosociale
Desseilles, François ULg; Mikolajczak, Gladys; Desseilles, Martin ULg

in Santé Mentale au Québec (2012), XXXVII(2), 65-94

This article proposes a new bio-psychosocial perspective on the links between mental health, more specifically suicide, and nutrition. We first discuss the links between nutrition, its social role and ... [more ▼]

This article proposes a new bio-psychosocial perspective on the links between mental health, more specifically suicide, and nutrition. We first discuss the links between nutrition, its social role and suicide. The act of eating is studied as a social integrator and regulator, in the light of Durkheim’s theorization. Nutrition is also examined as self-destruction, with particular cases of “diet-related suicide.” De-structuring of meals and alienating foods are identified as contributing factors to the de-structuring of “nutrition models.” We then discuss the place of food within the psychopathology, and finally, the links between biological parameters reflected in food and suicide risk. Avenues of research and intervention along this bio-psychosocial approach are also proposed. [less ▲]

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See detailThe fate of incoming stimuli during NREM sleep is determined by spindles and the phase of the slow oscillation
Schabus, M.; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Heib, D. P. J. et al

in Frontiers in Neurology (2012), 3(40), 1-11

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See detailDepression alters "top-down" visual attention: a dynamic causal modeling comparison between depressed and healthy subjects.
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Schwartz, Sophie; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2011), 54(2), 1662-8

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we recently demonstrated that nonmedicated patients with a first episode of unipolar major depression (MDD) compared to matched controls exhibited an ... [more ▼]

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we recently demonstrated that nonmedicated patients with a first episode of unipolar major depression (MDD) compared to matched controls exhibited an abnormal neural filtering of irrelevant visual information (Desseilles et al., 2009). During scanning, subjects performed a visual attention task imposing two different levels of attentional load at fixation (low or high), while task-irrelevant colored stimuli were presented in the periphery. In the present study, we focused on the visuo-attentional system and used "Dynamic Causal Modeling" (DCM) on the same dataset to assess how attention influences a network of three dynamically-interconnected brain regions (visual areas V1 and V4, and intraparietal sulcus (P), differentially in MDD patients and healthy controls. Bayesian model selection (BMS) and model space partitioning (MSP) were used to determine the best model in each population. The best model for the controls revealed that the increase of parietal activity by high attention load was selectively associated with a negative modulation of P on V4, consistent with high attention reducing the processing of irrelevant colored peripheral stimuli. The best model accounting for the data from the MDD patients showed that both low and high attention levels exerted modulatory effects on P. The present results document abnormal effective connectivity across visuo-attentional networks in MDD, which likely contributes to deficient attentional filtering of information. [less ▲]

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See detailInterplay between spontaneous and induced brain activity during human non-rapid eye movement sleep.
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Bonjean, Maxime; Schabus, Manuel et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2011), 108(37), 15438-43

Humans are less responsive to the surrounding environment during sleep. However, the extent to which the human brain responds to external stimuli during sleep is uncertain. We used simultaneous EEG and ... [more ▼]

Humans are less responsive to the surrounding environment during sleep. However, the extent to which the human brain responds to external stimuli during sleep is uncertain. We used simultaneous EEG and functional MRI to characterize brain responses to tones during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Sounds during wakefulness elicited responses in the thalamus and primary auditory cortex. These responses persisted in NREM sleep, except throughout spindles, during which they became less consistent. When sounds induced a K complex, activity in the auditory cortex was enhanced and responses in distant frontal areas were elicited, similar to the stereotypical pattern associated with slow oscillations. These data show that sound processing during NREM sleep is constrained by fundamental brain oscillatory modes (slow oscillations and spindles), which result in a complex interplay between spontaneous and induced brain activity. The distortion of sensory information at the thalamic level, especially during spindles, functionally isolates the cortex from the environment and might provide unique conditions favorable for off-line memory processing. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural precursors of delayed insight
Darsaud, Annabelle ULg; Wagner, Ullrich; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2011), 23(8), 1900-1910

The solution of a problem left unresolved in the evening can sometimes pop into mind as a sudden insight after a night of sleep in the following morning. Although favorable effects of sleep on insightful ... [more ▼]

The solution of a problem left unresolved in the evening can sometimes pop into mind as a sudden insight after a night of sleep in the following morning. Although favorable effects of sleep on insightful behavior have been experimentally confirmed, the neural mechanisms determining this delayed insight remain unknown. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we characterize the neural precursors of delayed insight in the number reduction task (NRT), in which a hidden task structure can be learned implicitly, but can also be recognized explicitly in an insightful process, allowing immediate qualitative improvement in task performance. Normal volunteers practiced the NRT during two fMRI sessions (training and retest), taking place 12 hours apart after a night of sleep. After this delay, half of the subjects gained insight into the hidden task structure ("solvers," S), whereas the other half did not ("nonsolvers," NS). Already at training, solvers and nonsolvers differed in their cerebral responses associated with implicit learning. In future solvers, responses were observed in the superior frontal sulcus, posterior parietal cortex, and the insula, three areas mediating controlled processes and supporting early learning and novice performance. In contrast, implicit learning was related to significant responses in the hippocampus in nonsolvers. Moreover, the hippocampus was functionally coupled with the basal ganglia in nonsolvers and with the superior frontal sulcus in solvers, thus potentially biasing participants' strategy towards implicit or controlled processes of memory encoding, respectively. Furthermore, in solvers but not in nonsolvers, response patterns were further transformed overnight, with enhanced responses in ventral medial prefrontal cortex, an area previously implicated in the consolidation of declarative memory. During retest in solvers, before they gain insight into the hidden rule, significant responses were observed in the same medial prefrontal area. After insight, a distributed set of parietal and frontal areas is recruited among which information concerning the hidden rule can be shared in a so-called global workspace. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional neuroimaging in sleep, sleep deprivation, and sleep disorders.
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg

in Chokroverty, Sudhansu; Montagna, Pasquale (Eds.) Handbook of Clinical Neurology, Sleep Disorders, Part I (2011)

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See detailNeuroimaging Insights into the Dreaming Brain
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel et al

in Dreams and Dreaming (2010)

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See detailWorking memory load affects chronotype- and time-of-day dependent cerebral activity modulations
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Leclercq, Yves ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2010), 19(Suppl. 2),

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See detailFunctional Neuroimaging Insights into the Physiology of Human Sleep
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

in Sleep (2010), 33(12), 1589-1603

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