References of "Desseilles, Martin"
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See detailSleep and Movement Disorders: Neuroimaging Aspects
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Ratti, Pietro-Luca et al

in Chokroverty, Sudhansu; Montagna, Pasquale; Allen, Richard (Eds.) et al Sleep and Movement Disorders (in press)

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See detailAdaptation et neurosciences I : craintes, société, méthodologie, finalité
Desseilles, Martin ULg

in Santé Mentale au Québec (2016), XL(3), 209-221

Cetarticleestlepremierdedeuxarticlesexplorantlesliensbidirection- nels entre le concept d’adaptation et celui de neurosciences. Nous verrons tout d’abord dans cet article que les neurosciences peuvent ... [more ▼]

Cetarticleestlepremierdedeuxarticlesexplorantlesliensbidirection- nels entre le concept d’adaptation et celui de neurosciences. Nous verrons tout d’abord dans cet article que les neurosciences peuvent être perçues comme ambi- tieuses et toutes-puissantes oscillant entre un danger réductionniste et déshuma- nisant ou bien cristallisant certains fantasmes de maîtrise. Nous verrons ensuite que la société s’adapte aux neurosciences en intégrant certaines méthodologies et certaines découvertes dans des domaines très variés, au point que nous pouvons nous questionner sur la neurosociété de demain. Ensuite nous verrons que la méthodologie des neurosciences est elle-même fréquemment remise en question et nécessite que chacun en connaisse les limites sans s’en tenir aux seules pro- messes. Après cela, nous verrons que l’adaptation vue comme une promesse d’un but déterminé et fini peut s’avérer rassurante mais est surtout improbable. [less ▲]

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See detailPsychiatry and psychotherapy in the electronic age
Desseilles, Martin ULg

Scientific conference (2015, December 11)

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See detailE-Mental Health - La psychiatrie et la psychotherapie à l'ère de l'électronique
Desseilles, Martin ULg

Scientific conference (2015, December 08)

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See detailNeurophysiologie du rêve et régulation des émotions
Desseilles, Martin ULg

Scientific conference (2015, November 30)

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See detailLe stress à l’aune des neurosciences
Desseilles, Martin ULg

Scientific conference (2015, October 15)

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See detailCompétences émotionnelles et dépression
Desseilles, Martin ULg

Scientific conference (2015, October 06)

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See detailNeurosciences et Psychiatrie : parallélisme ou convergence ?
Desseilles, Martin ULg

Scientific conference (2015, October 02)

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See detailImportance of cognitive (dys)function in Major Depressive Disorders
Desseilles, Martin ULg

Scientific conference (2015, May 30)

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See detailNeural correlates of generation and inhibition of verbal association patterns in mood disorders.
Piguet, Camille; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Cojan, Yann et al

in Social cognitive and affective neuroscience (2015), 10(7), 978-86

OBJECTIVES: Thought disorders such as rumination or flight of ideas are frequent in patients with mood disorders, and not systematically linked to mood state. These symptoms point to anomalies in ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Thought disorders such as rumination or flight of ideas are frequent in patients with mood disorders, and not systematically linked to mood state. These symptoms point to anomalies in cognitive processes mediating the generation and control of thoughts; for example, associative thinking and inhibition. However, their neural substrates are not known. METHOD: To obtain an ecological measure of neural processes underlying the generation and suppression of spontaneous thoughts, we designed a free word association task during fMRI allowing us to explore verbal associative patterns in patients with mood disorders and matched controls. Participants were presented with emotionally negative, positive or neutral words, and asked to produce two words either related or unrelated to these stimuli. RESULTS: Relative to controls, patients produced a reverse pattern of answer typicality for the related vs unrelated conditions. Controls activated larger semantic and executive control networks, as well as basal ganglia, precuneus and middle frontal gyrus. Unlike controls, patients activated fusiform gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus and medial prefrontal cortex for emotional stimuli. CONCLUSIONS: Mood disorder patients are impaired in automated associative processes, but prone to produce more unique/personal associations through activation of memory and self-related areas. [less ▲]

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See detailPrise en charge des états-limites.
Desseilles, Martin ULg

Scientific conference (2014, December 09)

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See detailAbility to Maintain Internal Arousal and Motivation Modulates Brain Responses to Emotions
Sterpenich, Virginie; Schwartz, Sophie; MAQUET, Pierre ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2014)

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See detailPleine conscience et Neurosciences, plaidoyer pour une psychiatrie plus contemplative…
Desseilles, Martin ULg

Scientific conference (2014, November 28)

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See detailLes cognitions sociales
Desseilles, Martin ULg

Scientific conference (2014, October 22)

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See detailPanorama de l'état limite ou du trouble borderline.
Desseilles, Martin ULg

Scientific conference (2014, September 27)

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See detailE-Health
Desseilles, Martin ULg

Scientific conference (2014, May 14)

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See detailModérateur pour le symposium « les cognitions sociales »
Desseilles, Martin ULg

Scientific conference (2014, January)

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See detailNeural substrates of rumination tendency in non-depressed individuals.
Piguet, Camille; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie et al

in Biological psychology (2014), 103

The tendency to ruminate, experienced by both healthy individuals and depressed patients, can be quantified by the Ruminative Response Scale (RRS). We hypothesized that brain activity associated with ... [more ▼]

The tendency to ruminate, experienced by both healthy individuals and depressed patients, can be quantified by the Ruminative Response Scale (RRS). We hypothesized that brain activity associated with rumination tendency might not only occur at rest but also persist to some degree during a cognitive task. We correlated RRS with whole-brain fMRI data of 20 healthy subjects during rest and during a face categorization task with different levels of cognitive demands (easy or difficult conditions). Our results reveal that the more subjects tend to ruminate, the more they activate the left entorhinal region, both at rest and during the easy task condition, under low attentional demands. Conversely, lower tendency to ruminate correlates with greater activation of visual cortex during rest and activation of insula during the easy task condition. These results indicate a particular neural marker of the tendency to ruminate, corresponding to increased spontaneous activity in memory-related areas, presumably reflecting more internally driven trains of thoughts even during a concomitant task. Conversely, people who are not prone to ruminate show more externally driven activity. [less ▲]

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See detailHypnosis, attachment, and oxytocin:an integrative perspective (1.).
Zelinka, Vladimir; Cojan, Yann; Desseilles, Martin ULg

in The International journal of clinical and experimental hypnosis (2014), 62(1), 29-49

This article considers links between clinical hypnosis, attachment theory, and oxytocin. First, it proposes that commonalities between clinical hypnosis and attachment theory may improve our understanding ... [more ▼]

This article considers links between clinical hypnosis, attachment theory, and oxytocin. First, it proposes that commonalities between clinical hypnosis and attachment theory may improve our understanding of the hypnotherapeutic process. Then, it suggests that an integrative model unifying clinical hypnosis and attachment theory may constitute a link between clinical hypnosis and a neurobiological factor such as oxytocin. Finally, it discusses the implications of these hypotheses for clinical practice and future researches. [less ▲]

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