References of "Desmet, Christophe"
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See detailExposure to Bacterial CpG DNA Protects from Airway Allergic Inflammation by Expanding Regulatory Lung Interstitial Macrophages.
Sabatel, Catherine ULg; Radermecker, Coraline ULg; Fievez, Laurence ULg et al

in Immunity (2017), 46(3), 457-473

Living in a microbe-rich environment reduces the risk of developing asthma. Exposure of humans or mice to unmethylated CpG DNA (CpG) from bacteria reproduces these protective effects, suggesting a major ... [more ▼]

Living in a microbe-rich environment reduces the risk of developing asthma. Exposure of humans or mice to unmethylated CpG DNA (CpG) from bacteria reproduces these protective effects, suggesting a major contribution of CpG to microbe-induced asthma resistance. However, how CpG confers protection remains elusive. We found that exposure to CpG expanded regulatory lung interstitial macrophages (IMs) from monocytes infiltrating the lung or mobilized from the spleen. Trafficking of IM precursors to the lung was independent of CCR2, a chemokine receptor required for monocyte mobilization from the bone marrow. Using a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, we found that adoptive transfer of IMs isolated from CpG-treated mice recapitulated the protective effects of CpG when administered before allergen sensitization or challenge. IM-mediated protection was dependent on IL-10, given that Il10-/- CpG-induced IMs lacked regulatory effects. Thus, the expansion of regulatory lung IMs upon exposure to CpG might underlie the reduced risk of asthma development associated with a microbe-rich environment. [less ▲]

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See detailSevere deficiency of the somatotrope GHRH/GH/IGF-1 axis induces a dramatic susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection.
Farhat, Khalil ULg; Bodart, Gwennaëlle ULg; Desmet, Christophe ULg et al

Poster (2016, November 07)

Deletion of the growth hormone-releasing hormone gene (Ghrh) results in a severe deficiency of the somatotrope GHRH-GH-IGF-1 axis causing dwarf phenotype that can be reversed by GH or GHRH supplementation ... [more ▼]

Deletion of the growth hormone-releasing hormone gene (Ghrh) results in a severe deficiency of the somatotrope GHRH-GH-IGF-1 axis causing dwarf phenotype that can be reversed by GH or GHRH supplementation (Alba & Salvatori, Endocrinology 2004;145:4134). In basal conditions, the immunological phenotype of Ghrh-/- mice is not markedly disturbed except for a decrease in B cells and an increase in generation of thymic (t) Treg cells (submitted for publication). These data prompted us to investigate immune responses of Ghrh-/- mice using vaccination and infection by S. pneumoniae as models since the response to both stimuli rely on the innate immune system and B cells. Ghrh-/- mice were unable to trigger production of specific IgM and IgG against serotype 1 pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPS) after vaccination with either native PPS (Pnx23) or protein-PPS conjugate (Prev-13) vaccines. A short GH supplementation to Ghrh-/- mice (1 daily injection of 1 mg/kg GH for 4 weeks) restored IgM and IgG response to Pnx23 vaccine but not to Prev-13. This suggests that GH differently impacts on B-1, marginal zone B-2 or innate B-1 B cells. Furthermore, after intranasal instillation of a non-lethal dose of serotype 1 S. pneumoniae, Ghrh-/- mice exhibited a dramatic susceptibility reflected by bacteremia 24h after infection and a survival limit of 72 h, compared to WT C57BL/6 mice that need only 24h to clear infection. The possible impact of GH deficiency on components of the innate immune system that play an important role in defense of the respiratory tract against pneumococcal infection is under current investigation. (*Equal first and last authors. KF is supported by a research grant from the Lebanese Government; GB is Research Assistant, CD is Research Associate, and VG is Research Director at the NFSR of Belgium). [less ▲]

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See detailLung resident eosinophils represent a distinct cell subset with homeostatic functions
Mesnil, Claire ULg; Raulier, Stéfanie ULg; Paulissen, Geneviève et al

Conference (2016, October 21)

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See detailELP3 links tRNA modification to IRES-dependent translation of LEF-1 to promote metastasis in breast cancer
Delaunay, Sylvain ULg; Rapino, Francesca ULg; Tharun, Lars et al

in The Journal of Experimental Medicine (2016), 213

Quantitative and qualitative changes in mRNA translation occur in tumor cells and support cancer progression and metastasis. Post-transcriptional nucleoside modifications of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) at the ... [more ▼]

Quantitative and qualitative changes in mRNA translation occur in tumor cells and support cancer progression and metastasis. Post-transcriptional nucleoside modifications of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) at the wobble U34 base are highly conserved and contribute to translation fidelity. Here, we show that ELP3 and CTU1/2, partner enzymes in U34 mcm5s2-tRNA modification, are upregulated in human breast cancers and sustain metastasis. Elp3 genetic ablation strongly impaired invasion and metastasis formation in the PyMT model of invasive breast cancer. Mechanistically, ELP3 and CTU1/2 support cellular invasion through the translation of the oncoprotein DEK. As a result, DEK promotes the IRES-dependent translation of the pro-invasive transcription factor LEF1. Consistently, a DEK mutant, whose codon composition is independent of U34 mcm5s2-tRNA modification, escapes the ELP3- and CTU1-dependent regulation and restores the IRES-dependent LEF1 expression. Our results demonstrate the key role of U34 tRNA modification to support specific translation during breast cancer progression and highlight a functional link between tRNA modification- and IRES-dependent translation during tumor cell invasion and metastasis. [less ▲]

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See detailCpG-DNA expand immunosuppressive interstitial macrophages from Ly6c+ local precursors
Sabatel, Catherine ULg; Radermecker, Coraline ULg; Fievez, Laurence ULg et al

in Proceeding of Cell Symposia: 100 years of phagocytes (2016, September)

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See detailLung-resident eosinophils represent a distinct regulatory eosinophil subset
Mesnil, Claire ULg; Raulier, Stéfanie ULg; Paulissen, G et al

in Journal of Clinical Investigation (2016), 126(9), 3275-3295

Increases in eosinophil numbers are associated with infection and allergic diseases, including asthma, but there is also evidence that eosinophils contribute to homeostatic immune processes. In mice, the ... [more ▼]

Increases in eosinophil numbers are associated with infection and allergic diseases, including asthma, but there is also evidence that eosinophils contribute to homeostatic immune processes. In mice, the normal lung contains resident eosinophils (rEos), but their function has not been characterized. Here, we have reported that steady-state pulmonary rEos are IL-5–independent parenchymal Siglec-FintCD62L+CD101lo cells with a ring-shaped nucleus. During house dust mite–induced airway allergy, rEos features remained unchanged, and rEos were accompanied by recruited inflammatory eosinophils (iEos), which were defined as IL-5–dependent peribronchial Siglec-FhiCD62L–CD101hi cells with a segmented nucleus. Gene expression analyses revealed a more regulatory profile for rEos than for iEos, and correspondingly, mice lacking lung rEos showed an increase in Th2 cell responses to inhaled allergens. Such elevation of Th2 responses was linked to the ability of rEos, but not iEos, to inhibit the maturation, and therefore the pro-Th2 function, of allergen-loaded DCs. Finally, we determined that the parenchymal rEos found in nonasthmatic human lungs (Siglec-8+CD62L+IL-3Rlo cells) were phenotypically distinct from the iEos isolated from the sputa of eosinophilic asthmatic patients (Siglec-8+CD62LloIL-3Rhi cells), suggesting that our findings in mice are relevant to humans. In conclusion, our data define lung rEos as a distinct eosinophil subset with key homeostatic functions. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Innate Immune Response of Equine Bronchial Epithelial Cells is Altered by Training
Frellstedt, Linda ULg; Gosset, Philippe; Kervoaze, Gwenola et al

in Veterinary Research (2015), 46(3), 1-12

Respiratory diseases, including inflammatory airway disease (IAD), viral and bacterial infections, are common problems in exercising horses. The airway epithelium constitutes a major physical barrier ... [more ▼]

Respiratory diseases, including inflammatory airway disease (IAD), viral and bacterial infections, are common problems in exercising horses. The airway epithelium constitutes a major physical barrier against airborne infections and plays an essential role in the lung innate immune response mainly through toll-like receptor (TLR) activation. The aim of this study was to develop a model for the culture of equine bronchial epithelial cells (EBEC) in vitro and to explore EBEC innate immune responses in trained horses. Bronchial epithelial biopsies were taken from 6 adult horses during lower airway endoscopy. EBEC were grown in vitro by an explant method. The innate immune response of EBEC was evaluated in vitro by treatment with TLR ligands. TLR3 is the most strongly expressed TLR at the mRNA level in EBEC and stimulation of EBEC with Poly(I:C), an analog of viral dsRNA, triggers a strong secretion of IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-6 and CXCL8. We further evaluated the EBEC innate immune response in horses that underwent a 4-month-training program. While training had no effect on TLR mRNA expression in EBEC as well as in bronchial biopsies, it increased the production of IFN-β after stimulation with a TLR3 ligand and decreased the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6 after stimulation with a TLR2 and TLR3 ligand. These findings may be implicated in the increased risk for viral and bacterial infections observed in sport horses. Altogether, we report a successful model for the culture of EBEC that can be applied to the investigation of pathophysiologic conditions in longitudinal studies. [less ▲]

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See detailGeneration and validation of a mouse model for conditional inactivation of PLAGL1
Pirottin, Dimitri ULg; Schurmans, Stéphane ULg; Francois, Cédric ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 4th edition : FARAH Day 2014 (2014)

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See detailTraining Modifies Innate Immune Responses in Blood Monocytes and in Pulmonary Alveolar Macrophages
Frellstedt, Linda ULg; Waldschmidt, Ingrid; Gosset, Philippe et al

in American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology (2014), 51(1), 135-142

In humans, strenuous exercise causes increased susceptibility to respiratory infections associated with down-regulated expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), co-stimulatory and antigen-presenting ... [more ▼]

In humans, strenuous exercise causes increased susceptibility to respiratory infections associated with down-regulated expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), co-stimulatory and antigen-presenting molecules. Lower airway diseases are also a common problem in sport and racing horses. Because the innate immunity plays an essential role in lung defense mechanisms, we aimed to assess the effect of acute exercise and training on innate immune responses in two different compartments. Blood monocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) were collected from horses in an untrained, moderately and intensively trained as well as deconditioned state before and after a strenuous exercise test (SET). The cells were analysed for TLR mRNA expression by real-time PCR in vitro and the cytokine production after in vitro stimulation with TLR ligands was measured by ELISA. Our results showed that training, but not acute exercise, modified the innate immune responses in both compartments. The mRNA expression of TLR3 was down-regulated by training in both cell types, whereas the expression of TLR4 was up-regulated in monocytes. Monocytes treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and a synthetic diacylated lipoprotein (FSL) showed increased cytokine secretion in trained and deconditioned subjects indicating the activation of cells at the systemic level. The production of TNF-alpha and IFN-beta in non-stimulated and stimulated PAM was decreased in trained and deconditioned horses and might therefore explain the increased susceptibility to respiratory infections. Our study reports a dissociation between the systemic and the lung response to training that is probably implicated in the systemic inflammation and in the pulmonary susceptibility to infection. [less ▲]

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See detailAdjuvants targeting the DNA sensing pathways – Alum based adjuvants
Desmet, Christophe ULg

in Ishii, Ken; Tang, Choon Kit (Eds.) Biological DNA Sensor: The Impact of Nucleic Acids on Diseases and Vaccinology (2013)

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See detailIdentification of a pharmacologically tractable Fra-1/ADORA2B axis promoting breast cancer metastasis
Desmet, Christophe ULg; Gallenne, Tristan; Prieur, Alexandre et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2013)

Metastasis confronts clinicians with two major challenges: estimating the patient's risk of metastasis and identifying therapeutic targets. Because they are key signal integrators connecting cellular ... [more ▼]

Metastasis confronts clinicians with two major challenges: estimating the patient's risk of metastasis and identifying therapeutic targets. Because they are key signal integrators connecting cellular processes to clinical outcome, we aimed to identify transcriptional nodes regulating cancer cell metastasis. Using rodent xenograft models that we previously developed, we identified the transcription factor Fos-related antigen-1 (Fra-1) as a key coordinator of metastasis. Because Fra-1 often is overexpressed in human metastatic breast cancers and has been shown to control their invasive potential in vitro, we aimed to assess the implication and prognostic significance of the Fra-1-dependent genetic program in breast cancer metastasis and to identify potential Fra-1-dependent therapeutic targets. In several in vivo assays in mice, we demonstrate that stable RNAi depletion of Fra-1 from human breast cancer cells strongly suppresses their ability to metastasize. These results support a clinically important role for Fra-1 and the genetic program it controls. We show that a Fra-1-dependent gene-expression signature accurately predicts recurrence of breast cancer. Furthermore, a synthetic lethal drug screen revealed that antagonists of the adenosine receptor A2B (ADORA2B) are preferentially toxic to breast tumor cells expressing Fra-1. Both RNAi silencing and pharmacologic blockade of ADORA2B inhibited filopodia formation and invasive activity of breast cancer cells and correspondingly reduced tumor outgrowth in the lungs. These data show that Fra-1 activity is causally involved in and is a prognostic indicator of breast cancer metastasis. They suggest that Fra-1 activity predicts responsiveness to inhibition of pharmacologically tractable targets, such as ADORA2B, which may be used for clinical interference of metastatic breast cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailResident lung CD11b+Ly6C- dendritic cells are responsible for allergic airway sensitization to house dust mite in mice
Mesnil, Claire ULg; Sabatel, Catherine ULg; Marichal, Thomas ULg et al

in Proceeding of International Congress of Immunology 2013 (2013)

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See detailTraining modifies the innate immune response both in the airways and in blood in horses
Frellstedt, Linda ULg; Gosset, Philippe; Desmet, Christophe ULg et al

in Proceedings of the ICI (2013)

Lower airway diseases are common problems in sports and racing horses. In humans, exercise has been associated with upper respiratory tract infections due to down-regulated expression of Toll-like ... [more ▼]

Lower airway diseases are common problems in sports and racing horses. In humans, exercise has been associated with upper respiratory tract infections due to down-regulated expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), costimulatory and antigen-presenting molecules on monocytes. The objectives of this study were 1) to examine the expression of TLRs in equine bronchial epithelial cells (EBEC) and blood monocytes in untrained and trained horses; 2) to stimulate EBEC and monocytes in vitro with TLR ligands, in order to mimic bacterial/viral infections; 3) to compare the cytokine production of EBEC and monocytes in untrained and trained horses. Bronchial biopsies were taken from 8 horses during lower airway endoscopy at rest and 24 hours after a standardized exercise test (SET). Bronchial epithelial cells were grown in vitro and activated with TLR ligands. Blood monocytes were collected at rest and after the SET. TLR1-TLR9 expression was evaluated via real-time PCR and cytokine production was measured via ELISA. TLR3 and TLR4 expression was modified by training. The expression of TLR2, TLR7 and TLR8 was modified only by strenuous exercise in trained horses. Training had local immuno-suppressive effects shown by a decreased production of TNF-alpha and IFN-beta in EBEC in response to TLR2 and TLR3 ligands. Training also caused a systemic pro-inflammatory response evidenced by increased production of TNF-alpha in monocytes in response to TLR2 and TLR4 ligands. These findings suggest that training and strenuous exercise in trained subjects may result in an increased susceptibility of the lower airway to infections associated with systemic inflammation. [less ▲]

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