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See detailTechnologie de production de masse d’insectes - INSECTECH
Richard, Gaetan ULg; Hance, Thierry; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg et al

Report (2014)

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See detailTechnologie de production de masse d’insectes - INSECTECH
Richard, Gaetan ULg; Hance, Thierry; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg et al

Report (2013)

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See detailSubstrate Marking by an Invasive Ladybeetle: Seasonal Changes in Hydrocarbon Composition and Behavioral Responses
Durieux, Delphine ULg; Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Vanderplanck et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(4),

The multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), aggregates inside dwellings during the winter to survive the cold. Recent published reports have highlighted that overwintering individuals ... [more ▼]

The multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), aggregates inside dwellings during the winter to survive the cold. Recent published reports have highlighted that overwintering individuals use hydrocarbon markings deposited on surfaces by conspecifics to orient toward aggregation sites. In the current study, monthly GC-MS analyses revealed seasonal modifications in the chemical profile of substrate markings deposited by moving individuals. The markings of overwintering ladybeetles contained larger proportions of heptacosadiene, nonacosadiene, hentriacontadienes, and methyl-nonacosanes, along with a lower proportion of heptacosene and nonacosene. This finding suggests the importance of the unsaturated and/or branched hydrocarbons in the H. axyridis aggregation process. Subsequently, we conducted behavioral assays to test whether (1) there is seasonal variation in the behavioral response of H. axyridis individuals toward substrate markings deposited by conspecifics in the same physiological state and (2) the observed behavioral modification is due to a change in ladybeetle sensitivity and/or a change in the chemical composition of the substrate marking. The results indicate that overwintering individuals exhibit a stronger ‘‘following’’ response toward conspecific substrate markings. This behavior is linked to both the physiological state of ladybeetles and the specific chemical profile of the marking biomolecules deposited under overwintering conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailAggregation behaviour of Harmonia axyridis
Durieux, Delphine ULg; Fischer, Christophe ULg; Fassotte, Bérénice ULg et al

in Bulletin OILB/SROP = IOBC/WPRS Bulletin (2013), 94

The multicoloured Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), forms large aggregations inside dwellings to survive cold winters. The species’ migratory flight is well documented ... [more ▼]

The multicoloured Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), forms large aggregations inside dwellings to survive cold winters. The species’ migratory flight is well documented. Harmonia axyridis preferentially moves towards prominent and visually contrasting elements (Obata, 1986; Nalepa et al., 2005). However, the mechanisms involved in the selection of aggregation sites are misunderstood. The work presented here was devoted to the study of chemicals used by H. axyridis during its aggregation process. During sampling of infested dwellings, non-volatile compounds were collected from aggregation sites. Gas chromatrography-mass spectometry (GC-MS) analyses showed that the chemicals found on the substrate where the beetles aggregate were different from the ones collected around these aggregation sites. These two blends are made up of the same long-chain hydrocarbons, comprising saturated and unsaturated homologues, but they are quantitatively different, the blend collected directly on the overwintering sites containing a higher proportion of saturated compounds than the other one. Behavioural experiments, involving overwintering H. axyridis individuals, were then conducted in the laboratory to understand the roles of these chemicals in aggregation. Firstly, an aggregation assay using the blend collected inside overwintering sites showed a clear preference of ladybeetles for areas containing these compounds, highlighting the retention capacity of the blend on H. axyridis. On the other hand, a Y-shaped tube assay, using the chemical blend found around the sites, showed that those compounds are used by male and female congeners as cues, allowing individuals to orientate towards the side of the set-up containing the tested chemicals. These results suggest the use of two different area markings by H. axyridis during its aggregation: the first one to lead congeners towards aggregation sites, and the second to ensure the cohesion of the cluster. Additional investigations were conducted to study the influence of (1) the presence of congeners and (2) the shelters’ luminosity on the H. axyridis decision to settle and aggregate under shelters. A binary choice experiment conducted in the laboratory under non-wintering conditions showed that the multicoloured Asian ladybeetles present a permanent aggregative behaviour, as a result of the existence of social interactions. These experiments also highlighted the clear preference of H. axyridis for dark shelters. [less ▲]

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See detailFactors involved in the aggregation of Harmonia axyridis Pallas
Durieux, Delphine ULg; Fischer, Christophe ULg; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis et al

Conference (2012, May 22)

In order to survive cold winters, the invasive multicoloured Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) forms large aggregations in dwellings to overwinter. The factors ... [more ▼]

In order to survive cold winters, the invasive multicoloured Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) forms large aggregations in dwellings to overwinter. The factors involved in the selection of aggregation sites remain misunderstood. The work presented herein focussed on the study of the chemical compounds involved in this phenomenon. Chemical and behavioural analyses highlighted that long-chain hydrocarbons lead congeners towards aggregation sites and ensure the cohesion of the cluster. Subsequently, physical factors were investigated. We studied the influence of (1) the density of individuals and (2) the quality of available shelters on H. axyridis decision to settle and aggregate under shelters. A binary choice experiment conducted in laboratory showed that the multicoloured Asian ladybeetles present a permanent aggregative behaviour, even during non-wintering conditions. These experiments also highlighted the existence of social interactions between individuals. All these results contribute to improve knowledge of this behaviour in H. axyridis and could be used in the design of species-specific traps in order to control infestations in dwellings. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-assemblage and quorum in the earthworm Eisenia fetida (Oligochaete, Lumbricidae)
Zirbes, Lara ULg; Brostaux, Yves ULg; Mescher, Mark et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(3), 32564

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See detailRole of long-chain hydrocarbons in the aggregation behaviour of Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)
Durieux, Delphine ULg; Fischer, Christophe ULg; Brostaux, Yves ULg et al

in Journal of Insect Physiology (2012)

The multicoloured Asian ladybeetles, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), form large aggregations inside dwellings to survive cold winters, causing annoyances to householders from their number and sometimes the ... [more ▼]

The multicoloured Asian ladybeetles, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), form large aggregations inside dwellings to survive cold winters, causing annoyances to householders from their number and sometimes the induction of allergic reactions. Migratory flight and macrosite choice of this species is well documented. H. axyridis shows a hypsotactic behaviour and a clear preference for contrasting visual elements. However, how the microsite is selected remains undocumented, although a better understanding of the implicated factors could lead to the development of new control methods for this pest. In this work, we have hypothesized that non-volatile compounds are involved in the microsite choice and the aggregation process of this beetle. Long chain hydrocarbons were identified inside aggregation sites, comprising saturated and unsaturated homologues. An aggregation bioassay was then conducted on overwintering individuals, highlighting the retention capacity of the previously cited compounds on the tested ladybeetles. Additional investigations have shown that H. axyridis males and females, originating from overwintering sites, deposit a similar blend of molecules while walking. A Y-shaped tube assay revealed that this blend is used by male and female congeners as cue, allowing individuals to orientate towards the treated side of the olfactometer. These results suggest the use of two different blends of long chain hydrocarbons by H. axyridis during its aggregative period, the first one to lead conspecifics towards aggregation sites (microsites) and the second to ensure the cohesion of the aggregation. These findings support the potential use of these blends, in association with volatiles, in the design of traps in order to control infestations of this species in dwellings. [less ▲]

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See detailStudy of the factors involved in the aggregation of Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera : Coccinellidae)
Durieux, Delphine ULg; Fischer, Christophe ULg; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2012), 77(1), 101-104

The aggregative behaviour of the multicoloured Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis Pallas, during winters, is still misunderstood. Our study was focused on the chemical and physical factors involved in ... [more ▼]

The aggregative behaviour of the multicoloured Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis Pallas, during winters, is still misunderstood. Our study was focused on the chemical and physical factors involved in the selection of its aggregation sites. Chemical and behavioural analyses highlighted that long-chain hydrocarbons lead congeners towards aggregations and ensure the cohesion of the cluster. On the other hand, we investigated the influence of (1) the density of individuals and (2) the quality of available shelters on H. axyridis decision to settle and aggregate under shelters. A binary choice experiment conducted in laboratory highlighted a permanent aggregative behaviour of H. axyridis, even during non-wintering conditions, and the existence of social interactions between individuals. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical and physical factors involved in the aggregation behaviour of Harmonia axyridis Pallas
Durieux, Delphine ULg; Fischer, Christophe ULg; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis et al

Conference (2011, July 27)

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See detailSpatio-temporal patterns of preys and wastes moved by ants within the nests
Diez, Lise; Lejeune, Philippe ULg; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis et al

Poster (2010)

Living in society in a restricted and confined nest implies important organisational issues. Ants have to control food supply for the whole colony as well as nest defence but they also have to manage ... [more ▼]

Living in society in a restricted and confined nest implies important organisational issues. Ants have to control food supply for the whole colony as well as nest defence but they also have to manage everyday life tasks such as waste rejection. Within the nest, ants are faced with different items that have to be used or rejected regarding colony needs. We study whether they can discriminate between three types of items (building material, nestmate cadaver or prey) and accordingly adapt the spatio-temporal distribution of these items. Therefore, we used colonies of the ant Myrmica rubra settled in a 2-dimensional space and introduced different items in the nest centre. We show that each item triggers a specific cascade of behaviour. We observed important differences in rejection time: building items were removed within a few minutes and cadavers after a few hours while preys could be kept in the nest for a day or more. Furthermore, the movement of items by ants leads to specific spatio-temporal patterns. Building items were removed with a straight trajectory from the centre to the exit of the nest. Ant cadavers that could bear pathogens showed a trajectory avoiding and moving away from larvae that are potentially more sensitive to diseases. The moving of preys headed an oscillating pattern: these items were alternatively taken on larvae for consumption and then moved away from them, until final rejection. This specific pattern may be due to the coupled effects of groups of ants acting alternatively to feed larvae and reject waste. In the case of cadavers and building items, only undertaking ants may be active. These results suggest that each ant is able to discriminate and interact with each other leading at the collective level to a complex cascade of behaviour. [less ▲]

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See detailClusters formation in Eisenia fetida (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae)
Zirbes, Lara ULg; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Brostaux, Yves ULg et al

in 17th Benelux Congress of Zoology Classic Biology in Modern Times (2010)

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See detailA new case of consensual decision: collective movement in earthworms
Zirbes, Lara ULg; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Brostaux, Yves ULg et al

in Ethology (2010), 115

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See detailSocial behaviour in Eisenia fetida (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidea)
Zirbes, Lara ULg; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Haubruge, Eric ULg

(2008, October 30)

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (8 ULg)