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See detailEtude détaillée de la stabilité d'une paroi rocheuse située à Couillet
Delvoie, Simon ULg; Schroeder, Christian; Collin, Frédéric ULg

Report (2012)

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See detailEngineering geological mapping in Wallonia (Belgium) : present state and recent computerized approach
Delvoie, Simon ULg; Radu, Jean-Pol ULg; Ruthy, Ingrid ULg et al

Poster (2012, April)

An engineering geological map can be defined as a geological map with a generalized representation of all the components of a geological environment which are strongly required for spatial planning ... [more ▼]

An engineering geological map can be defined as a geological map with a generalized representation of all the components of a geological environment which are strongly required for spatial planning, design, construction and maintenance of civil engineering buildings. In Wallonia (Belgium) 24 engineering geological maps have been developed between the 70s and the 90s at 1/5,000 or 1/10,000 scale covering some areas of the most industrialized and urbanized cities (Liège, Charleroi and Mons). They were based on soil and subsoil data point (boring, drilling, penetration test, geophysical test, outcrop. . . ). Some displayed data present the depth (with isoheights) or the thickness (with isopachs) of the different subsoil layers up to about 50 m depth. Information about geomechanical properties of each subsoil layer,useful for engineers and urban planners, is also synthesized. However, these maps were built up only on paper and progressively needed to be updated with new soil and subsoil data. The Public Service of Wallonia and the University of Liège have recently initiated a study to evaluate the feasibility to develop engineering geological mapping with a computerized approach. Numerous and various data (about soil and subsoil) are stored into a georelational database (the geotechnical database – using Access, Microsoft®). All the data are geographically referenced. The database is linked to a GIS project (using ArcGIS, ESRI®). Both the database and GIS project consist of a powerful tool for spatial data management and analysis. This approach involves a methodology using interpolation methods to update the previous maps and to extent the coverage to new areas. The location (x, y, z) of each subsoil layer is then computed from data point. The geomechanical data of these layers are synthesized in an explanatory booklet joined to maps. [less ▲]

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See detailRisk assessment of soil compaction in Walloon Region (Belgium)
Rosiere, Charlotte ULg; Delvoie, Simon ULg; Charlier, Robert ULg et al

Poster (2010, May 07)

The proposed Soil Framework Directive COM(2006)232 requires Member States to identify areas at risk of erosion, decline in organic matter, salinisation, compaction, sealing and landslides, as well as to ... [more ▼]

The proposed Soil Framework Directive COM(2006)232 requires Member States to identify areas at risk of erosion, decline in organic matter, salinisation, compaction, sealing and landslides, as well as to set up an inventory of contaminated sites. The present project aims to identify the susceptibility to compaction of soils of the Walloon Region (Belgium) and to recommend good farming practices avoiding soil compaction as far as possible. Within this scope, the concept of precompression stress (Pc) (Horn and Fleige, 2003) was used. Pc is defined as the maximum major principal stress that a soil horizon can withstand against any applied external vertical stress. If applied stress is higher than Pc, the soil enters in a plastic state, not easily reversible. For a given soil, the intensity of soil compaction is mainly due to the applied load which depends on vehicle characteristics (axle load, tyre dimensions, tyre inflation pressure, and vehicle velocity). To determine soil precompression stress, pedotransfert functions of Lebert and Horn (1991) defined at two water suctions (pF 1.8 and 2.5) were used. Parameters required by these functions were found within several databases (Aardewerk and Digital Map of Walloon Soils) and literature. The validation of Pc was performed by measuring stress-strain relationships using automatic oedometers. Stresses of 15.6, 31, 3, 62.5, 125, 250, 500 and 1000 kPa were applied for 10 min each. In this study, the compaction due to beet harvesters was considered because the axle load can exceed 10 tons and these machines are often used during wet conditions. The compaction at two depth levels was considered: 30 and 50 cm. Compaction of topsoil was not taken into account because, under conventional tillage, the plough depth is lower than 25 cm. Before and after the passage of the machines, following measurements were performed: granulometry, density, soil moisture, pF curve, Atterberg limits, ... The software Soilflex (Keller et al., 2007) was used to estimate the distribution of the vertical stresses sigma z in the soil. Comparison was performed between sigma z and Pc. The following data simulated the passage of a beet harvester machine (mass: 23 580 kg; load: 18 000 kg) in a silty soil located in Hesbaye and classified as Aba (Sirjacobs et al., 2000). The passage of the machine would create a Pc of around 100 kPa at 30 cm depth, while the stress induced by the machine would reach 240 kPa. In the field borders, where more vehicle traffic was usually observed and where the soil was over consolidated, Pc would reach 180 kPa, while sigma z would be 220 kPa. In both cases, the risk of compaction created by the passage of the machine would be high. [less ▲]

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