References of "Delvenne, Pierre"
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See detailCo-producing sociotechnical solutions in difficult times: the art of governing nuclear wastes in France
Parotte, Céline ULg; Delvenne, Pierre ULg

Conference (2017, June 29)

Radioactive wastes and their management are posing pressing political and epistemic issues to modern societies such as, for instance, how shall we design sociotechnical solutions to deal with an object ... [more ▼]

Radioactive wastes and their management are posing pressing political and epistemic issues to modern societies such as, for instance, how shall we design sociotechnical solutions to deal with an object with a half-life of more than 100.000 years? This paper’s starting point is the so-called “participatory turn” in the nuclear waste management (NWM) in France, when tensions appeared concerning claims of epistemic authority of national nuclear agencies. In 1990, in the aftermath of violent contestations and citizen mobilization in four Departments, the then Prime Minister of France, Michel Rocard, decided to impose a one-year moratorium on the research conducted by the national nuclear waste management organization (ANDRA). A not so well-known parliamentary technology assessment (PTA) institution, OPECST (the French Office Parlementaire d’Evaluation des Choix Scientifiques et Technologiques), was called to the rescue to clear up a difficult situation and to restore trust between state and scientific agencies and a critical population. We find that OPECST played a surprisingly central role in defining the French NWM program. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the Disruptive Potential of 3D Printing
Delvenne, Pierre ULg; Vigneron, Lara

in Bowman, Diana; Rip, Arie; Stokes, Elen (Eds.) Embedding New Technologies into Society: A Regulatory, Ethical and Societal Perspective (2017)

This chapter seeks to describe a variety of contexts in which 3D printing technologies are expected to emerge over the next 15 years and exert their so-called disruptive potential. We first provide a ... [more ▼]

This chapter seeks to describe a variety of contexts in which 3D printing technologies are expected to emerge over the next 15 years and exert their so-called disruptive potential. We first provide a brief introduction to 3D printing and we explain how it actually works. Then, we describe the paradigmatic change allowed by 3D printing in the industrial sector with a shift toward mass customisation. In particular, we focus on the biomedical sector, which is an interesting case in point because of the important number of innovations and the growth of 3D printed biomedical parts, a trend that is expected to continue in the future. To account for the dramatic, transversal, and transformative potential that 3D printing has in that whole sector, we first concentrate on 3D printing of biomedical instruments and implants for patients and, second, on additive bio- manufacturing of human tissues and organs. Then, we address the expectations raised by 3D printing to empowering users in non-industrial domains (such as in fabrication laboratories or with desktop 3D printers at home). In the last section, we turn to discussing the impact of 3D printing on the governance actors and we raise important issues for further research in the political economy of 3D printing technologies. [less ▲]

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See detailResponsible research and innovation as a travesty of technology assessment?
Delvenne, Pierre ULg

in Journal of Responsible Innovation (2017)

The relation between technology assessment (TA) and responsible research and innovation (RRI) is a very topical (and controversial) issue, as TA is clearly enveloped in broader science, technology and ... [more ▼]

The relation between technology assessment (TA) and responsible research and innovation (RRI) is a very topical (and controversial) issue, as TA is clearly enveloped in broader science, technology and innovation (STI) processes, such as the EU-wide shift towards RRI. In this short response to van Lente et al.’s [Van Lente, Harro, Tsjalling Swierstra, and Pierre-Benoit̂ Joly. 2017. “Responsible Innovation as a Critique of Technology Assessment.” Journal of Responsible Innovation] essay, I first stress that this contribution has several merits; for example, it points to pervasive challenges for TA communities, such as the issue of including normative concerns when assessing innovations, it opens these challenges to debate, without shying away from engaging TA communities. However, I disagree with the authors’ claim that RRI would be ‘a next step of TA’ or even a ‘form of TA’. In my essay, I explain why I believe RRI is different from TA and why, rather than a critique of TA, RRI could instead lead to a travesty of TA, threatening the vitality and the uniqueness of TA institutions in the long-term. Under the spell of RRI, TA risks being reduced to a role of mere provider of ex-ante impact assessments. I conclude that following the money attached to RRI has a price that TA institutions should carefully, critically and reflexively consider before they pay. [less ▲]

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See detailEmbedded Promissory Futures: The Rise of Networked Agribusiness in Argentina’s Bioeconomy
Delvenne, Pierre ULg

in Pavone, Vincenzo; Goven, Joanna (Eds.) Bioeconomies: Life, Technology, and Capital in the 21st Century (2017)

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See detailDancing without listening to the music: learning from some failures of the ‘national innovation systems’ in Latin America
Delvenne, Pierre ULg; Thoreau, François ULg

in Kuhlmann, Stefan; Ordóñez-Matamoros, Gonzalo (Eds.) Research Handbook on Innovation Governance for Emerging Economies (2017)

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See detailWorld-System Analysis 2.0: Globalized Science in Centers and Peripheries
Delvenne, Pierre ULg; Kreimer, Pablo

in Tyfield, David; Lave, Rebecca; Randalls, Samuel (Eds.) et al Handbook of the Political Economy of Science (2017)

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See detailLe futur du travail à l'ère digitale
Delvenne, Pierre ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

Cette présentation aborde de manière critique les changements qui s'opèrent dans le monde du travail sous l'impulsion des technologies digitales (robotisation, automatisation, objets connectés, etc). Dans ... [more ▼]

Cette présentation aborde de manière critique les changements qui s'opèrent dans le monde du travail sous l'impulsion des technologies digitales (robotisation, automatisation, objets connectés, etc). Dans une perspective interdisciplinaire, à l'aide de nombreux exemples, elle aborde les interactions entre la technologie, l'économie, la société et le politique et examine les conditions d'émergences et les conséquences des changements en cours sur le monde du travail. Elle invite à prendre urgemment la pleine mesure de la rupture qui s'opère avec la digitalisation et formule des recommandations concrètes. [less ▲]

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See detailFast and not furious: an inquiry into the current low-risk/high-gain configuration of public participation
Rosskamp, Benedikt ULg; Delvenne, Pierre ULg; Charlier, Nathan ULg et al

Conference (2016, June 29)

For several years scholars pointed at the development of a “participatory turn” in science, technology and innovation (STI). Decisively informed by STS, “public involvement” and then “public engagement” ... [more ▼]

For several years scholars pointed at the development of a “participatory turn” in science, technology and innovation (STI). Decisively informed by STS, “public involvement” and then “public engagement” with STI have been enacted in a broad array of participatory experiments across Europe. These experiments were usually informed by rhetoric of citizen empowerment and distributed governance, against the limitations of technocratic approaches and traditional innovation processes, in order to “enrich”, “deepen”, “broaden” the knowledge base of our democracies. As “embarked researchers”, STS scholars played a crucial role in facilitating and legitimizing the organization of participatory events engaging a variety of publics. This paper will rely on the knowledge and expertise we gathered when organizing multiple participatory events over the last decade, while still trying maintain a critical distance with regard to our own engagement and the types of participation we contributed to enact. More specifically, we propose to draw on the lessons learnt from two recent projects, the organization of a citizens’ summit (Europe Wide Views on Sustainable Consumption) and a prospective study to gauge the potential of involving users in a Living Lab in the health sector in Wallonia. These two projects produced different publics (“citizens-consumers” or “users”), were informed by different political rationales (“sustainability” or “inclusive innovation”), took place in diverse settings (a European FP7 project or a project funded by the Walloon Region) and connected to several narratives of public empowerment through participation (“being heard in policymaking” or “accelerating and improving health”). Our contribution maps and compares the different instrumental and strategic framings of the engagement of publics in those two projects, emphasizing the roles attributed to fabricated publics but also the construction of categories such as the “state” and the “economy”. It unpacks some critical issues related to the methods and techniques used in the concrete implementation of participatory exercises such as, for example, the relation between the assigned tasks, the allowed forms of dialogue between the participants, the room for engagement with the issue(s) at stake and the broader understanding of processes these inputs were supposed to contribute to. Our analysis highlights a tension between the justificatory rationales for public engagement and its specific enactments. In these fast and optimized exercises, participants and their inputs become resources that need to be methodologically maximized and from which “value” may be extracted for instrumental use, i.e. innovation or policy-making. In this configuration in which, we argue, most participation experiments are stuck, the increasing involvement of publics in either policy-making or innovation will only be likely to produce low risk and high gain for powerful actors, who manage to take the best advantage of unpaid and uncritical labour from participants. Due attention (including self-reflexive critique) will be paid to alternative framings and critical insights, which were methodologically eliminated or ‘tamed’ to avoid threatening the design of the overall participatory exercise. By externalizing critique to favour unconditional compliance with imposed notions of the “greater good”, we scrutinize the risk for participation to become a mere space of experimentation for the sake of innovation and economic growth. Furthermore, we argue that critical scholarly work should help to move beyond this particular division of labour and responsibilities between the spheres of science, society and the state in order to avoid re-enacting traditional conceptions of the policy-making process and innovation pathways. [less ▲]

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See detailEmerging Hybridities under Networked Agribusiness in Argentina
Delvenne, Pierre ULg

Conference (2016, June 24)

Science and Technology Studies (STS) are paying greater attention to the interactions between new technologies and politico-economic orders. Dynamics of promises and expectations with regard to ... [more ▼]

Science and Technology Studies (STS) are paying greater attention to the interactions between new technologies and politico-economic orders. Dynamics of promises and expectations with regard to technological developments, and their uptake, play a major role in shaping political-economic policies, institutional practices and wider societal mutations. Informed by the theoretical perspective of co-production (Jasanoff 2004), this paper addresses the political economy of GM soy agriculture in Argentina as both epistemic and social orders. We engage ‘micro’ perspectives looking at situated social experiments with farmers and their interrelations with ‘macro’ phenomena such as capital-labour relations and forms of ‘neoliberalism’. We find that the emerging hybridities in present time’s Argentina are caught between the promissory futures of agroindustrial innovation and the historical, political and material conditions of agricultural production that give rise to these presents in the first place. Looking at three of such hybridities (the blurring of boundaries between modern/national, agriculture/industry and leasing/ownership), we highlight the ways in which elements of political-economic structures and human agency got bound up with technoscientific advances (Jasanoff 2015). Our contribution reveals the importance of the concept of ‘network’ to make sense of the dominant logic of agribusiness and it amounts to ‘rugged’ approach to networks with due attention to the complex topographies of circulating power and morality. [less ▲]

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See detailRevers lifté et coup droit "à plat" : le (néo)libéralisme en débat
Delvenne, Pierre ULg; Rossignol, Nicolas ULg

Article for general public (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (1 ULg)
See detailGérer l’Etat belge, pas la S.A. Belgique
Delvenne, Pierre ULg; Rossignol, Nicolas ULg

Article for general public (2016)

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See detailRoundup : l’interdiction ferait-elle pire que bien ?
Delvenne, Pierre ULg

Article for general public (2016)

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See detailAs above, so below? Narrative Salience and Side Effects of National Innovation Systems
Claisse, Frédéric ULg; Delvenne, Pierre ULg

in Critical Policy Studies (2016)

This article furthers previous attempts at integrating narratology in policy analysis. Embracing an open-ended definition of narrative, it stresses the importance of maintaining distinct narrative levels ... [more ▼]

This article furthers previous attempts at integrating narratology in policy analysis. Embracing an open-ended definition of narrative, it stresses the importance of maintaining distinct narrative levels and, more generally, of taking into account the pragmatic dimension of narration as an activity, including the often-implicit role and focalization of the policy analyst. Developing a conceptual analogy between storytelling and the exercise of power, it argues for a critical use of practical imagination in ‘cold’ situations of ‘narrative salience’, characterized by the absence of controversy or uncertainty, an uneven distribution of the power of scenarization. These propositions for a ‘revisited’ approach to policy narratives, equidistant from the positivist and post-positivist dichotomy, are tested on the case of ‘narrative salience’ where a particular storyline, national innovation systems, is so dominant that there appears to be no ‘counter-story’. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Future of Ageing - Stakeholder Involvement on the Future of Care
Barland, Marianne; Delvenne, Pierre ULg; Rosskamp, Benedikt ULg

in Klüver, Lars; Øjvind Nielsen, Rasmus; Jørgensen, Marie Louise (Eds.) Policy-Oriented Technology Assessment Across Europe: Expanding Capacities (2016)

Barland et al. describe an example project showcasing the strengths of technology assessment methodology in structuring stakeholder dialogues in a cross-European context. The authors provide an in-depth ... [more ▼]

Barland et al. describe an example project showcasing the strengths of technology assessment methodology in structuring stakeholder dialogues in a cross-European context. The authors provide an in-depth account of the method design choices made and their underlying rationale. Beyond the buzzword, well-structured and transparent stakeholder dialogue can help to balance difficult issues of policy priority – in this case by balancing the contributions of technological innovation against social reorganization as a means of securing sustainable future health-care service for senior citizens. The article shows the added value of multi-site dialogues based in national debates but linked to the European policy development process [less ▲]

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See detailMaking Technology Assessment Accessible to New Players
Delvenne, Pierre ULg; Rosskamp, Benedikt ULg; Fitzgerald, Ciara et al

in Klüver, Lars; Nielsen, Rasmus; Jorgensen, Marie-Louise (Eds.) Policy-Oriented Technology Assessment Across Europe. Expanding Capacities (2016)

This chapter reports on the two PACITA summers schools, which were aimed at teaching TA as well as enhancing mutual-learning activities. The first summer school concentrated on the topic ‘Renewable Energy ... [more ▼]

This chapter reports on the two PACITA summers schools, which were aimed at teaching TA as well as enhancing mutual-learning activities. The first summer school concentrated on the topic ‘Renewable Energy Systems- role and use of PTA’ and it was held in Liege in June 2012. The second summer school addressed the topic of ‘Ageing and Technology’, and was held in Cork in June 2014. We describe the rationale and format of the summer school in order to present a comprehensive account of how it was introduced TA, both its rational and its methods, to a new audience. We argue that as the responsible innovation agenda continues to gain traction among policy makers, societal actors and academics, education initiatives such as TA summer schools can have an important role to play in the future of the governance of science, technology and innovation. [less ▲]

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See detailBroadening, Deepening, and Governing Innovation: Flemish Technology Assessment in Historical and Socio-Political Perspective
Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg; Charlier, Nathan ULg; Rosskamp, Benedikt ULg et al

in Research Policy (2015), 44(10), 1877-1886

This article examines how science, technology, and innovation (STI) policies in Flanders (Belgium) are affected by, and potentially transformed through, technology assessments (TAs). Broadly defined, TAs ... [more ▼]

This article examines how science, technology, and innovation (STI) policies in Flanders (Belgium) are affected by, and potentially transformed through, technology assessments (TAs). Broadly defined, TAs encompass activities and programs that expand and deepen the knowledge base of contemporary knowledge-based economies (KBEs), typically by including new actors (e.g. trade unions), ideas (e.g. science in society), and rationales (e.g. participatory techniques) in STI processes. Starting from the regionalization of STI policy in Belgium and the convergence of Flemish STI around global KBE principles, the article exemplifies how since the 1980s successive Flemish TA waves (early- warning, bottom-up, and interactive TA) have co-evolved with successive generations of Flemish innovation policy. Building on these findings, it argues that Flemish TA has assumed the role of mediator between science and society, both by counteracting and accommodating dominant STI paradigms. By providing a historical and socio-political perspective on TA and innovation policy, the article draws critical attention to the institutional settings and societal contexts in which TA is embedded, and questions TA's strategic utility within contemporary KBEs. This perspective sheds light on the Flemish government's recent decision to close its parliamentary TA institute and the institutional expansion of TA elsewhere in Europe. [less ▲]

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See detailBuilding the future of European sustainability governance: a critical self-reflexive approach to a participatory Technology Assessment exercise
Claisse, Frédéric ULg; Delvenne, Pierre ULg; Macq, Hadrien ULg et al

Conference (2015, June 12)

Europe Wide Views (EWV) on Sustainable Consumption is a cross-European citizen consultation providing unique insights into the views of ordinary citizens across Europe on sustainable consumption and ... [more ▼]

Europe Wide Views (EWV) on Sustainable Consumption is a cross-European citizen consultation providing unique insights into the views of ordinary citizens across Europe on sustainable consumption and policies connected to this complex issue. The consultation took place simultaneously in 11 EU member states on October 25th 2014 and involved 1035 European citizens. Throughout the day, the participating citizens deliberated with fellow citizens and voted on issues relating to future policy-making on sustainable consumption. Overall, EWV was framed as a participatory Technology Assessment (pTA) exercise. Following the hypothesis that TA practitioners do not enough question the design of their projects’ and their own normative assumptions, we suggest to put the consultation we organised in Wallonia (Belgium) to the test. The aggregated results of the consultations point to the fact that “citizens are [now, after the EWV] strongly in favour of policy-makers taking ambitious steps in order to foster a more sustainable consumption in society, and want to personally take action in this process”. Relying on our previous work on dystopia as empowerment, we suggest a self-reflexive experiment to inquire into how much the design of the consultation (including the materials that were circulated) and the messages that we conveyed pictured a threatening present that would lead to an apocalyptic future ‘if nothing was done’, thereby potentially biasing the results that will are to be translated into political recommendations. Our analysis will benefit from cross-breeding future studies and science and technology studies to think afresh invisible normativities induced by pTA of sustainable governance. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (30 ULg)