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See detailHigh inorganic triphosphatase activities in bacteria and mammalian cells: Identification of the enzymes involved.
Kohn, Grégory ULg; Delvaux, David ULg; Lakaye, Bernard ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(9), 43879

Background: We recently characterized a specific inorganic triphosphatase (PPPase) from Nitrosomonas europaea. This enzyme belongs to the CYTH superfamily of proteins. Many bacterial members of this ... [more ▼]

Background: We recently characterized a specific inorganic triphosphatase (PPPase) from Nitrosomonas europaea. This enzyme belongs to the CYTH superfamily of proteins. Many bacterial members of this family are annotated as predicted adenylate cyclases, because one of the founding members is CyaB adenylate cyclase from A. hydrophila. The aim of the present study is to determine whether other members of the CYTH protein family also have a PPPase activity, if there are PPPase activities in animal tissues and what enzymes are responsible for these activities. Methodology/Principal Findings: Recombinant enzymes were expressed and purified as GST- or His-tagged fusion proteins and the enzyme activities were determined by measuring the release of inorganic phosphate. We show that the hitherto uncharacterized E. coli CYTH protein ygiF is a specific PPPase, but it contributes only marginally to the total PPPase activity in this organism, where the main enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of inorganic triphosphate (PPPi) is inorganic pyrophosphatase. We further show that CyaB hydrolyzes PPPi but this activity is low compared to its adenylate cyclase activity. Finally we demonstrate a high PPPase activity in mammalian and quail tissue, particularly in the brain. We show that this activity is mainly due to Prune, an exopolyphosphatase overexpressed in metastatic tumors where it promotes cell motility. Conclusions and General Significance: We show for the first time that PPPase activities are widespread in bacteria and animals. We identified the enzymes responsible for these activities but we were unable to detect significant amounts of PPPi in E. coli or brain extracts using ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The role of these enzymes may be to hydrolyze PPPi, which could be cytotoxic because of its high affinity for Ca2+, thereby interfering with Ca2+ signaling. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging Guided Proteomics Unveils Heterogeniety in Colorectal Carcinoma Liver Metastases – Implications for Targeted Therapies.
blomme, Arnaud; Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Delvaux, David ULg et al

in Proceedings Giga Day 2012 (2012, May 04)

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See detailINTRA-TUMORAL HETEROGENEITY AND RATIONAL SELECTION OF ANTIGENS FOR TARGETED THERAPY OF LIVER METASTASES
Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Blomme, Arnaud ULg; Delvaux, David ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 8953

Objectives: Targeted therapies of liver metastases are gaining a major stake in current and future treatment options. However, the malignant lesions are heterogeneous in nature offering niches for cancer ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Targeted therapies of liver metastases are gaining a major stake in current and future treatment options. However, the malignant lesions are heterogeneous in nature offering niches for cancer cells causing treatment resistance and relapse. Therefore, a rational strategy is needed to select targetable antigens that would overcome this intra-tumoral heterogeneity. Methods: After ethical committee approval, 48 fresh liver metastases of colorectal origin were prospectively collected from patients undergoing liver resection. Here we macroscopically divided the lesion in different zones and generated a unique quantitative picture of the proteome heterogeneity in colorectal carcinoma liver metastases. Particular focus was laid on accessible proteins, a protein subclass comprising cell membrane associated and extracellular proteins. Accordingly, the tissues were ex-vivo biotinylated, affinity purified and analyzed for each zone separately using nano-UPLC-MSe proteomics technique. In total over 1500 unique proteins were statistically divided into different patterns of expression. Results: We have generated a quantitative picture of the proteome heterogeneity in colorectal carcinoma liver metastases. The study offers insight into novel targets but also antigens against which the antibodies are already involved in clinical trials or treatment of liver metastases. Extensive clustering and validation experiments highlight novel markers that offer the potential to homogeneously cover the metastatic lesion and become better targets. Conclusions: Two such antigens, LTBP2 and TGFBI were selected for functional analysis in colorectal carcinoma cells. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that in particular TGFBI is relevant for migration and proliferation capacity of colorectal cancer cells. The suppression of this protein led to significant inhibition of tumor growth, crystalizing it as bona fide target for the development of anti-metastases therapies. [less ▲]

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See detailUne invitée surprise
Binet, Audrey; Delvaux, David ULg; Bettendorff, Lucien ULg

Learning material (2011)

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See detailA specific inorganic triphosphatase from Nitrosomonas europaea: structure and catalytic mechanism
Delvaux, David ULg; Murty, Mamidana R.V.S; Gabelica, Valérie ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2011), 286

The CYTH superfamily of proteins is named after its two founding members, the CyaB adenylyl cyclase from Aeromonas hydrophila and the human 25-kDa thiamine triphosphatase. Because these proteins often ... [more ▼]

The CYTH superfamily of proteins is named after its two founding members, the CyaB adenylyl cyclase from Aeromonas hydrophila and the human 25-kDa thiamine triphosphatase. Because these proteins often form a closed β-barrel, they are also referred to as “Triphosphate Tunnel Metalloenzymes” (TTM). Functionally, they are characterized by their ability to bind triphosphorylated substrates and divalent metal ions. These proteins exist in most organisms and catalyze different reactions, depending on their origin. Here we investigate structural and catalytic properties of the recombinant TTM protein from Nitrosomonas europaea (NeuTTM), a 19-kDa protein. Crystallographic data show that it crystallizes as a dimer and that, in contrast to other TTM proteins, it has an open β-barrel structure. We demonstrate that NeuTTM is a highly specific inorganic triphosphatase, hydrolyzing tripolyphosphate (PPPi) with high catalytic efficiency in the presence of Mg2+. These data are supported by native mass spectrometry analysis showing that the enzyme binds PPPi (and Mg-PPPi) with high affinity (Kd < 1.5 μM), while it has a low affinity for ATP or thiamine triphosphate. In contrast to Aeromonas and Yersinia CyaB proteins, NeuTTM has no adenylyl cyclase activity, but it shares several properties with other enzymes of the CYTH superfamily, e.g. heat-stability, alkaline pH optimum and inhibition by Ca2+ and Zn2+ ions. We suggest a catalytic mechanism involving a catalytic dyad formed by K52 and Y28. The present data provide the first characterization of a new type of phosphohydrolase (unrelated to pyrophosphatases or exopolyphosphatases), able to hydrolyze inorganic triphosphate with high specificity. [less ▲]

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See detailThiaminylated adenine nucleotides — chemical synthesis, structural characterization and natural occurrence
Frederich, Michel ULg; Delvaux, David ULg; Gigliobianco, Tiziana ULg et al

in FEBS Journal (2009), 276(12), 32563268

Thiamine and its three phosphorylated derivatives (mono-, di- and triphosphate) occur naturally in most cells. Recently, we reported the presence of a fourth thiamine derivative, adenosine thiamine ... [more ▼]

Thiamine and its three phosphorylated derivatives (mono-, di- and triphosphate) occur naturally in most cells. Recently, we reported the presence of a fourth thiamine derivative, adenosine thiamine triphosphate (AThTP), produced in E. coli in response to carbon starvation. Here, we show that the chemical synthesis of AThTP leads to another new compound, adenosine thiamine diphosphate (thiaminylated ADP, AThDP), as a side product. The structure of both compounds was confirmed by mass spectrometry and 1H-, 13C- and 31P-NMR and some of their chemical properties were determined. Our results show an upfield shifting of the C-2 proton of the thiazolium ring in adenosine thiamine derivatives compared to the conventional thiamine phosphate derivatives. This modification of the electronic environment of the C-2 proton might be explained by a through-space interaction with the adenosine moiety, suggesting an U-shaped folding of adenosine thiamine derivatives. Such a structure where the C-2 proton is embedded in a closed conformation can be located using molecular modeling as an energy minimum. In E. coli, AThTP may account for 15% of total thiamine under energy stress. It is less abundant in eukaryotic organisms, but is consistently found in mammalian tissues and in some cell lines. Using a HPLC method, we show for the first time that AThDP may also occur in small amounts in E. coli and in vertebrate liver. The discovery of two natural thiamine adenine compounds further highlights the complexity and diversity of thiamine biochemistry, which is not restricted to the cofactor role of thiamine diphosphate. [less ▲]

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