References of "Delrue, Gaël"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRelative Contribution of Walking Speed, Ataxia and Gait asymmetry to the Composition of Gait in Multiple Sclerosis
PHAN BA, Remy ULg; Pierard, Sébastien ULg; LOMMERS, Emilie ULg et al

Poster (2013, October)

Introduction - Objective: Walking speed measured according to the T25FW is the most widely used descriptor of gait in MS clinical research and practice but other dimensions influencing gait variance exist ... [more ▼]

Introduction - Objective: Walking speed measured according to the T25FW is the most widely used descriptor of gait in MS clinical research and practice but other dimensions influencing gait variance exist according to alternative gait analysis methods. The relative importance of these different dimensions of gait relatively to its variance is unknown. Methods: We measured the performances of persons with MS and healthy subjects on the T25FW and the Timed 20-Meter Walk (T20MW) performed in tandem with a new gait analysis system (GAIMS). We performed a factorial analysis of variance to underline the main dimensions influencing gait variance and observed their composition. Findings - Conclusion: The main factor influencing gait variance in conventional walk tests is mostly composed of features related to walking speed. Balance, gait asymmetry and variability also participate to this variance but to a lesser extent. The inverse is observed in tests performed in tandem gait. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntervention ergonomique à visée cognitive pour le maintien au travail de patients atteints de sclérose en plaques : construction d’une méthodologie et validation d’un questionnaire
Blavier, Adelaïde ULg; Monisse, Aurélié; DELRUE, Gaël ULg et al

in Van de Leemput, Cécile (Ed.) Activités humaines, Technologies et Bien-être (2013, July 11)

The purpose of this paper is to present the construction of a questionnaire in order to evaluate the specific work difficulties and compensation mechanisms developed by multiple sclerosis patients (MS ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this paper is to present the construction of a questionnaire in order to evaluate the specific work difficulties and compensation mechanisms developed by multiple sclerosis patients (MS). At the moment, it does not exist any questionnaire that links the patients cognitive deficits with their professional situation. This lack of accurate assessment is detrimental to the patients job retention. Our questionnaire was constructed from review of literature and interviews of patients and experts. Three groups of patients answered the questionnaire: MS patients, diabetics patients and a control group. We controlled the effect of anxiety and depression and we conducted a factorial analysis that showed the existence of 3 factors: the ergonomics factor (that includes cognitive difficulties and resources and adaptation process), the description of work situation and the social support. The three groups of participants obtained similar results for the work description and the social support while the group of patients with MS obtained a higher score than the other 2 groups for the ergonomics factor. These results suggest that our questionnaire is specific to the MS patients population and to their difficulties they met in their work situations. These results offered also some ways to increase job retention in MS patients population. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of the mode of walk on walking speed in multiple sclerosis: are you walking comfortably?
PHAN BA, Remy ULg; DELRUE, Gaël ULg; Pierard, Sébastien ULg et al

Poster (2013, June 10)

Introduction : Walking speed (WS) is the most frequent gait variable taken into account when measuring gait dysfunction in neurological diseases. Influences of the mode of walk instructed to the subject ... [more ▼]

Introduction : Walking speed (WS) is the most frequent gait variable taken into account when measuring gait dysfunction in neurological diseases. Influences of the mode of walk instructed to the subject, i.e. « as fast as possible » (AFAP) or « at a comfortable pace » (PrP) have not been well characterized in multiple sclerosis (MS). Objectives : to compare those 2 mode of walk in a population of persons with MS (pMS) and healthy volunteers (HV). Methods: WS was measured with a new automated device along a 25 foot distance (T25FW) as part of a multimodal evaluation of gait in an MS ambulatory department. Results: Baseline demographics between HV and pMS were comparable. Our first results demonstrate that (i) WS is obviously significantly higher in AFAP than in PrP both for pMS and HV (p < 0.001 for all comparisons) and (ii) the relative difference between AFAP and PrP WS is significantly higher in HV than in pMS (p < 0.001). The AFAP-PrP WS correlation is higher in pMS (r = 0.87, p < 0.001) than in HV (r = 0.51, p < 0.001). Finally, the relative difference between AFAP and PrP WS is significantly and negatively correlated with the PrP WS in HV (r = -0.41, p < 0.001) and pMS with mild to moderate disability (EDSS 0-3.5, r = -0.49, p < 0.01) but not in pMS with high disability (EDSS 4-5.5, r = 0.008). Conclusions : these results suggests that heatlhy subjects have access to a higher range of PrP WS than pMS and questions the regulation of PrP WS that might be under psychological or behavioural influences. The demonstration of a lower PrP-AFAP difference in MS suggests that pMS are either adopting a natural WS closer to their maximum WS, or alternatively that they can’t reach their maximum WS because of neurological impairments. Our results also emphasize the importance of the instructed mode of walk in the quantification of gait disorders both for routine clinical practice and clinical trials. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (26 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMotor fatigue measurement by distance-induced slow down of walking speed in multiple sclerosis
PHAN BA, Remy ULg; CALAY, Philippe ULg; GRODENT, Patrick ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(4), 34744

Background: Motor fatigue and ambulation impairment are prominent clinical features of people with multiple sclerosis (pMS). We hypothesized that a multimodal and comparative assessment of walking speed ... [more ▼]

Background: Motor fatigue and ambulation impairment are prominent clinical features of people with multiple sclerosis (pMS). We hypothesized that a multimodal and comparative assessment of walking speed on short and long distance would allow a better delineation and quantification of gait fatigability in pMS. Objectives: To compare 4 walking paradigms: the timed 25-foot walk (T25FW), a corrected version of the T25FW with dynamic start (T25FW+), the timed 100-meter walk (T100MW) and the timed 500-meter walk (T500MW). Methods: Thirty controls and 81 pMS performed the 4 walking tests in a single study visit. Results: The 4 walking tests were performed with a slower WS in pMS compared to controls even in subgroups with minimal disability. The finishing speed of the last 100-meter of the T500MW was the slowest measurable WS whereas the T25FW+ provided the fastest measurable WS. The ratio between such slowest and fastest WS (Deceleration Index, DI) was significantly lower only in pMS with EDSS 4.0-6.0, a pyramidal or cerebellar functional system score reaching 3 or a maximum reported walking distance !4000m. Conclusion: The motor fatigue which triggers gait deceleration over a sustained effort in pMS can be measured by the WS ratio between performances on a very short distance and the finishing pace on a longer more demanding task. The absolute walking speed is abnormal early in MS whatever the distance of effort when patients are unaware of ambulation impairment. In contrast, the DI-measured ambulation fatigability appears to take place later in the disease course. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA corrected version of the Timed-25 Foot Walk Test with a dynamic start to capture the maximum ambulation speed in multiple sclerosis patients
Phan-Ba, Rémy ULg; CALAY, Philippe ULg; GRODENT, Patrick ULg et al

in NeuroRehabilitation (2012), 30(4), 261-266

Background : No clinical test is currently available and validated to measure the maximum walking speed (WS) of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Since the Timed 25-Foot Walk Test (T25FW) is performed ... [more ▼]

Background : No clinical test is currently available and validated to measure the maximum walking speed (WS) of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Since the Timed 25-Foot Walk Test (T25FW) is performed with a static start, it takes a significant proportion of the distance for MS patients to reach their maximum pace. Objectives : In order to capture the maximum WS and to quantify the relative impact of the accelerating phase during the first meters, we compared the classical T25FW with a modified version (T25FW+) allowing a dynamic start after a 3 meters run-up. Methods : Sixty-four MS patients and 30 healthy subjects performed successively the T25FW and the T25FW+. Results : The T25FW+ was performed faster than the T25FW for the vast majority of MS and healthy subjects. In the MS population, the mean relative gain of speed due to the dynamic start on T25FW+ was independent from the EDSS and from the level of ambulation impairment. Compared to healthy subjects, the relative difference between dynamic versus static start was more important in the MS population even in patients devoid of apparent gait impairment according to the T25FW. Conclusion : The T25FW+ allows a more accurate measurement of the maximum WS of MS patients, which is a prerequisite to reliably evaluate deceleration over longer distance tests. Indirect arguments suggest that the time to reach the maximum WS may be partially influenced by the cognitive impairment status. The maximum WS and the capacity of MS patients to accelerate on a specific distance may be independently regulated and assessed separately in clinical trials and rehabilitation programs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 113 (34 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrimary central nervous system lymphoma in a patient treated with Natalizumab.
Phan-Ba, Rémy ULg; Bisig, Bettina ULg; Deprez, Manuel ULg et al

in Annals of Neurology (2011), 69(6), 1060-1

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFrontal hypometabolism does not explain inhibitory dysfunction in Alzheimer disease
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Delrue, Gaël ULg et al

in Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders (2002), 16(4, Oct-Dec), 228-238

A series of tasks assessing inhibitory processes was administered to patients with Alzheimer disease and control subjects. Two groups of patients with Alzheimer disease were examined: patients with ... [more ▼]

A series of tasks assessing inhibitory processes was administered to patients with Alzheimer disease and control subjects. Two groups of patients with Alzheimer disease were examined: patients with hypometabolism restricted to the posterior (temporal and parietal) cerebral areas and patients with hypometabolism in both posterior and anterior (frontal) cerebral areas. The performances of the patients with Alzheimer disease were inferior to those of control subjects on all inhibitory tasks, but the two groups of patients obtained similar scores. These data indicate that frontal lobe hypometabolism is not necessary to produce inhibitory impairment in Alzheimer disease. Consequently, inhibitory dysfunction could be the consequence of a (partial) disconnection process between posterior and anterior cerebral areas. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 165 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe relationships between executive dysfunction and frontal hypometabolism in Alzheimer's disease
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Delrue, Gaël ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Brain & Cognition (2001), 47(1/2), 272-275

A serie of tasks assessing executive functions was administered to patients with Alzheimer's disease and control subjects. Two groups of Alzheimer patients were examined : patients with hypometabolism ... [more ▼]

A serie of tasks assessing executive functions was administered to patients with Alzheimer's disease and control subjects. Two groups of Alzheimer patients were examined : patients with hypometabolism restricted to the posterior (temporal and parietal) cerebral areas and patients with hypometabolism in both posterior and anterior (frontal) cerebral areas. The performance of Alzheimer patients was inferior to control subjects on all executive tasks. However, the two groups of Alzheimer patients did not differ from each other on all tasks except one. These data indicate that frontal lobe hypometabolism is not necessary to produce executive impairment in Alzheimer's disease. Consequently, executive dysfunction could be the consequence of a disconnection process between posterior and anterior cerebral areas; [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (5 ULg)