References of "Delrez, Marc"
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See detailThe Cross-Cultural Legacy: Critical and Creative Writings in Memory of Hena Maes-Jelinek
Collier, Gordon; Davis, Geoffrey; Delrez, Marc ULiege et al

Book published by Brill/Rodopi (2017)

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See detailMourning and Metafiction in Peter Carey's Chemistry of Tears
Delrez, Marc ULiege

in Collier, Davis G; Ledent, Bénédicte (Eds.) The Cross-Cultural Legacy: Critical and Creative Writings in Memory of Hena Maes-Jelinek (2017)

Peter Carey’s recent novel shares the concern with ‘unoriginality’ which has become a hallmark of his later fiction. It can actually be argued that, through this new variation on a known theme, he ... [more ▼]

Peter Carey’s recent novel shares the concern with ‘unoriginality’ which has become a hallmark of his later fiction. It can actually be argued that, through this new variation on a known theme, he purports to move beyond the clichéd postmodern paradox that authenticities – whether psychological or aesthetic – are always essentially made up, in order to consider the matter from another angle, pondering the perilous moment when an overtly fabricated object somehow mysteriously springs to life. If, as the title suggests, even our most personal emotions can be rationalized in terms of chemical reactions, why then could we not pursue a reverse path of investigation and envisage material reality as the source providing the components for the creation of spirit? This is the subjective context in which the protagonist Catherine, who works as a horologist (clockwork expert) in a London museum, must reconstruct a nineteenth-century mechanical swan suspected by some to be harbouring the soul of its original maker. Interestingly Catherine, herself a die-hard rationalist, finds herself shaken by a devastating bereavement which makes her unusually open to any form of consolation – including the self-indulgence of nostalgia, but also of cocaine and alcohol – which is why she will whole-heartedly embrace the welcome distraction offered by her work of mechanical reconstruction. As part of her attempt to understand the structure of the automaton, she feels that she must immerse herself in the diaries left behind by the commissioner of the work, an Englishman named Henry Brandling animated by his faith that the elaborate toy may release enough energy in his consumptive son, Percy, to save him from his otherwise lethal condition. Thus Carey creates an opening into the rationalist fabric of his protagonist’s present, allowing her to entertain anachronistic fantasies about the life-saving (let alone life-giving) properties of true art. Inasmuch as Catherine’s perusal of the diaries eventually facilitates a circuitous confrontation of her own grief, so that her excursions into the past serve to shore up her fragile sense of a future, the text appears to vindicate its own fantastic claims about the demiurgic, or at least redemptive, powers of art. Perhaps predictably, some reviewers balked in the face of this species of self-promotion, repeating the oft-expressed view that Carey’s fiction, in view of its deliberate straining of the laws of credibility, finally fails to emerge from an enmeshment in its own favoured themes of forgery and imitative inadequacy. The ultimate question asked by the work is then whether it must be seen to be equal to its own promise of transcendence. The present paper, by way of its own descent into the past (and particularly through a comparison with My Life as a Fake which rehearses similar themes), will try to provide an answer, notably by circumscribing the intention of a text in which metafiction assumes a metaphysical dimension possibly unique in Carey’s corpus. [less ▲]

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See detailLes études australiennes, en quête d'une impossible post-colonialité
Delrez, Marc ULiege

Scientific conference (2016, April 06)

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See detailJanet Frame: Myths of Authorship, 1950-1990
Delrez, Marc ULiege

in Williams, Mark (Ed.) A History of New Zealand Literature (2016)

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See detailEmbarrassment in the Posthumous Fiction of Janet Frame
Delrez, Marc ULiege

in Journal of Postcolonial Writing (2015), 51(5), 579-90

It is generally assumed that Janet Frame suspended the publication of some of her work in her lifetime because it was felt to be deeply personal, or potentially embarrassing for people who might recognize ... [more ▼]

It is generally assumed that Janet Frame suspended the publication of some of her work in her lifetime because it was felt to be deeply personal, or potentially embarrassing for people who might recognize themselves in the portraits provided. These rationalizations fail to persuade, first because all of Frame’s published oeuvre anyway consists of a fictionalization of private existential matter, and the posthumous corpus hardly differs in this respect; and also because both Towards Another Sum- mer (2007) and In the Memorial Room (2013) feature a Kafkaesque concern with metamorphosis which serves to enhance the unrealistic tenor of the narratives, so that the novels again seem on a par with previously published self-conscious material. What is more distinctive about the new/old novels is less their allegedly embarrassing nature than their unusual degree of frontal engagement with the experience of embarrassment itself – their pondering of the pros and cons of shyness. This theme is addressed in aesthetic terms mostly. Frame’s artistic characters blush and squirm and writhe in ways which confirm the role played by embarrassment as an inadvertent recognition of, and an unwilling subscription to, an oppressive societal norm. Yet it can be shown that Frame, true to her customary dialectical mode of conceptualization, simultaneously uses embarrassment as a decentring strategy allowing the novels to work towards an exposure of so-called social normality. This exposure is achieved through a systematic policy of borrowing from, and testily reproducing, those very limited and limiting expressive codes which were found mortifying in the first place. [less ▲]

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See detailFossil Capacities in the Work of Janet Frame
Delrez, Marc ULiege

in Journal of New Zealand and Pacific Studies (2014), 2(1), 69-81

The Guyanese novelist and critic Wilson Harris defines the word fossil in an idiosyncratic sense, to invoke ‘a rhythmic capacity to re-sense contrasting spaces and to suggest that a curious rapport exists ... [more ▼]

The Guyanese novelist and critic Wilson Harris defines the word fossil in an idiosyncratic sense, to invoke ‘a rhythmic capacity to re-sense contrasting spaces and to suggest that a curious rapport exists between ruin and origin as latent to arts of genesis’ – prior to hinting that such a ‘heterogeneous scale’ of temporality can be seen to exist within the fictional universe fashioned by Janet Frame. This, in turn, implies that any appreciation of her work’s embeddedness in local (South Pacific) realities must simultaneously take account of the depths of spatiality created by means of her particular aesthetics. This article attempts to address Frame’s strange interest in ghostly vestiges of superseded experience, which she expresses through recurring allusions to subterranean strata of landscape encrypting a sense of ‘epochs and ages gone’ – as she phrases this in Living in the Maniototo. Indeed her settings beg the question of a ‘native capacity’ (another Harrisian phrase) possibly underlying her approach to New Zealand contemporary culture. Intriguingly, she probes the matter through her repeated evocation of reputedly extinct animal species – dinosaur, moa, takahe – which she sees in some cases to be gesturing towards the possibility of resuscitation, as with the tuatara mentioned in Towards Another Summer, and quite in keeping with an aesthetics of excavation subordinated to her quest for occulted forms of being and knowing. As some of Frame’s characters conceive this, it is a matter of realising that ‘the human eye is not consistent’ and can be supplemented through a form of third-eye vision paradoxically inherited in spite of the losses of history. [less ▲]

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See detailJanet Frame
Delrez, Marc ULiege

in Fouque, Antoinette; Didier, Béatrice; Calle-Gruber, Mireille (Eds.) Dictionnaire des Femmes créatrices (2013)

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See detailThea Astley
Delrez, Marc ULiege

in Fouque, Antoinette; Didier, Béatrice; Calle-Gruber, Mireille (Eds.) Dictionnaire des Femmes créatrices (2013)

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See detailReview of The Frame Function: An Inside-Out Guide to the Novels of Janet Frame, by Jan Cronin
Delrez, Marc ULiege

in Journal of New Zealand and Pacific Studies (2013), 1(1), 105-107

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See detailHistory of English Literature, Part II
Delrez, Marc ULiege; Michel-Michot, Paulette ULiege; Pagnoulle, Christine ULiege

Learning material (2013)

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See detailRilke in Frame
Delrez, Marc ULiege

Conference (2012, June 29)

This paper probes the connections between Rainer Maria Rilke and Janet Frame, emphasizing the temperamental and aesthetic similarities linking the two writers, and examining in particular the differential ... [more ▼]

This paper probes the connections between Rainer Maria Rilke and Janet Frame, emphasizing the temperamental and aesthetic similarities linking the two writers, and examining in particular the differential quality which informs an approach to prose-writing characterized by its constant gesturing towards poetry. While Frame's recourse to a modernist idiom seems to privilege an intense focus on her own artistic medium, felt to be divorced from any easily recognizable existential reality, it can be shown that her linguistic utopia, unlike Rilke's, finally fails to incorporate the promise of a restoration of reference or 'fullness' that would follow upon its realization within the text. [less ▲]

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See detailJames McAuley
Delrez, Marc ULiege

Article for general public (2012)

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See detail"Grace of the Crocodiles" Towards Deterritorialization of Culture in Robert Drewe's Grace
Delrez, Marc ULiege

in Collier, Gordon; Delrez, Marc; Fuchs, Anne (Eds.) et al Engaging with Literature of Commitment, Volume 2: The Worldly Scholar (2012)

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See detailEngaging with Literature of Commitment (vol. 1): Africa in the World
Collier, Gordon; Delrez, Marc ULiege; Fuchs, Anne et al

Book published by Rodopi (2012)

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See detailEngaging with Literature of Commitment (vol. 2): The Worldly Scholar
Collier, Gordon; Delrez, Marc ULiege; Fuchs, Anne et al

Book published by Rodopi (2012)

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See detailA Memory Trip: Partly in Tandem, Partly Quadrilogical
Collier, Gordon; Delrez, Marc ULiege; Fuchs, Anne et al

in Collier, Gordon; Delrez, Marc; Fuchs, Anne (Eds.) et al Engaging with Literature of Commitment (vols. 1 & 2) (2012)

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See detailTerre sacrée: Spectralité et réalisme magique dans la littérature australienne contemporaine
Delrez, Marc ULiege

in Decharneux, Baudouin; Maignant, Catherine; Watthee-Delmotte, Myriam (Eds.) Esthétique et Spiritualité I: Enjeux identitaires (2012)

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See detailShakespeare et Dieu
Delrez, Marc ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2011)

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See detailTricks of Invention and Epistemological Uncertainty in Janet Frame's An Angel at My Table
Delrez, Marc ULiege

Scientific conference (2011, July 08)

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See detailThe Nutshells of Fiction: Formal Remanence in the Works of Janet Frame
Delrez, Marc ULiege

Conference (2011, April 28)

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