References of "Delporte, Jean-Pierre"
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See detailPenetration of enrofloxacin into the nasal secretions and relationship between nasal secretions and plasma enrofloxacin concentrations after intramuscular administration in healthy pigs
Bimazubute, M.; Cambier, Carole ULg; Baert, K. et al

in Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (2010), 33(2), 183-188

The pharmacokinetic behaviour of enrofloxacin (ENRO) in plasma and nasal secretions of healthy pigs was investigated, after a single-dose intramuscular administration of 2.5 mg/kg body weight of the drug ... [more ▼]

The pharmacokinetic behaviour of enrofloxacin (ENRO) in plasma and nasal secretions of healthy pigs was investigated, after a single-dose intramuscular administration of 2.5 mg/kg body weight of the drug. Blood samples and nasal secretions were collected at predetermined times after drug administration. Concentrations of ENRO and its active metabolite ciprofloxacin (CIPRO) were determined in plasma and nasal secretions by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). CIPRO was not detected probably because we investigated young weaned pigs. The data collected in 12 pigs for ENRO were subjected to noncompartmental analysis. In plasma, the maximum concentration of drug (C-max), the time at which this maximum concentration of drug (T-max) was reached, the elimination half-life (t(beta)(1/2)) and the area under the concentration vs. time curve (AUC) were, respectively, 694.7 ng/mL, 1.0 h, 9.3 h and 8903.2 ng h/mL. In nasal secretions, Cmax, Tmax, t(beta)(1/2) and AUC were, respectively, 871.4 ng/mL, 2.0 h, 12.5 h and 11 198.5 ng.h/mL. In a second experiment conducted in 10 piglets, the relationship between concentrations of ENRO measured in the plasma and the nasal secretions has been determined following single-dose intramuscular administration of 2.5, 10 or 20 mg/kg body weight of the drug. It has been demonstrated that, among several variables, i.e., (1) the dose administered, (2) the time between intramuscular injection and blood sampling, (3) the age, (4) the sex, (5) the animal body weight and (6) the plasma concentration of the drug, only the latter influenced significantly the ENRO concentration in nasal secretions. Practically, using a generalized linear mixed model, ENRO concentrations in the nasal secretions (mu g/mL) can be predicted taking into account the ENRO concentrations in plasma (mu g/mL), according to the following equation: ENROnasal secretion 1.94 ENROplasma - 0.24. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of the presence of a clinical pharmacist in university hospital wards on the elderly or polymedicated patients care
Van Hees, Thierry ULg; Delporte, Jean-Pierre ULg; Petermans, Jean ULg

in Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging (The) (2009, June), 13(Supplement 1), 465

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See detailImpact of the presence of a clinical pharmacist in university hospital wards on the elderly or polymedicated patients care
Tshibungu Diambi, Annie; D'Orio, Vincenzo ULg; Delporte, Jean-Pierre ULg et al

in Pharmakon (2009, February), 41(1), 21

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See detailEffect of indomethacin on the metabolic and hormonal response to a standardized breakfast in normal subjects.
Luyckx, A. S.; Guerten, D.; Scheen, André ULg et al

in Acta Diabetologica Latina (1981), 18(3), 259-66

We have investigated the influence of a single oral administration of indomethacin on blood glucose, plasma free fatty acids (FFA), alpha-amino-nitrogen, insulin and glucagon concentrations in young ... [more ▼]

We have investigated the influence of a single oral administration of indomethacin on blood glucose, plasma free fatty acids (FFA), alpha-amino-nitrogen, insulin and glucagon concentrations in young healthy subjects. Two groups of 6 subjects were studied, the first received a standardized 500 kcal mixed meal without any previous drug administration (controls) whereas the second group received 50 mg indomethacin 2 h before ingesting an identical meal. Plasma indomethacin concentration reached its maximum (2.36 +/- 0.36 micro g/ml) 15 min after administration and declined to 0.45 +/- 0.04 micro g/ml after 2 h. Indomethacin ingestion was followed by a significant increase in blood glucose and plasma FFA reaching their maximum value at 45 min and returning to basal levels at 120 min. No simultaneous changes in plasma alpha-amino-nitrogen, insulin or glucagon levels were detected during this period. The meal was followed by a rise in blood glucose and plasma insulin as well as by a decrease in plasma FFA concentration. No significant differences were detected between the controls and the subjects receiving indomethacin. In controls, the meal was followed by a rise in plasma alpha-amino-nitrogen and a modest although significant increase in glucagon levels. In indomethacin-treated subjects, the increment of alpha-amino-nitrogen was less marked and the increase in plasma glucagon was not observed. Thus, indomethacin by itself can exert several metabolic effects; however, it does not deteriorate the blood glucose or insulin profile after a regular meal. The present work is the first to demonstrate that an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis inhibits the plasma glucagon rise occurring after a physiological stimulus such as a normal meal. On the basis of previous in vitro experiments, we suggest that this effect results from an inhibition of glucagon secretion by the PG synthesis inhibitor. [less ▲]

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