References of "Delmas, Pierre D"
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See detailLong-term effects of chondroitins 4 and 6 sulfate on knee osteoarthritis: the study on osteoarthritis progression prevention, a two-year, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.
Kahan, Andre; Uebelhart, Daniel; De Vathaire, Florent et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2009), 60(2), 524-33

OBJECTIVE: To assess the long-term effects of chondroitins 4 and 6 sulfate (CS) on the radiographic progression of, and symptom changes associated with, knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: We performed an ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To assess the long-term effects of chondroitins 4 and 6 sulfate (CS) on the radiographic progression of, and symptom changes associated with, knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: We performed an international, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in which 622 patients with knee OA were randomly assigned to receive either 800 mg CS (n = 309 patients) or placebo (n = 313 patients) once daily for 2 years. Radiographs of the target knee, using the Lyon schuss view, were obtained at the time of enrollment and at 12, 18, and 24 months. The minimum joint space width (JSW) of the medial compartment of the tibiofemoral joint was assessed by digital image analysis. The primary outcome was the loss in minimum JSW over 2 years. RESULTS: The intent-to-treat analysis demonstrated a significant reduction (P < 0.0001) in minimum JSW loss in the CS group (mean +/- SEM -0.07 +/- 0.03 mm) as compared with the placebo group (-0.31 +/- 0.04 mm). The percentage of patients with radiographic progression > or =0.25 mm was significantly reduced in the CS group compared with the placebo group (28% versus 41% [P < 0.0005]; relative risk reduction 33% [95% confidence interval 16-46%]). The number of patients needed to treat was 8 (95% confidence interval 5-17). Pain improved significantly faster in the CS group than in the placebo group (P < 0.01). There were no differences in safety between groups. CONCLUSION: The long-term combined structure-modifying and symptom-modifying effects of CS suggest that it could be a disease-modifying agent in patients with knee OA. [less ▲]

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See detailStrontium ranelate decreases the risk of hip fracture over 3 and 5 years in post menopausal women at high risk
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Felsenberg, D.; Boonen, Steven et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2008, June), 67(Suppl.II), 540

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See detailReduction in bone remodelling markers with monthly oral ibandronate (150 mg) and weekly alendronate (70 mg): results from the motion study
Collette, Julien ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Zerbini, C. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2008, April), 19(Suppl.1), 207

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See detailClinical evaluation of medicinal products for acceleration of fracture healing in patients with osteoporosis.
Goldhahn, Jörg; Scheele, Wim H.; Mitlak, Bruce H. et al

in BONE (2008), 43(2), 343-7

Pre-clinical studies indicate that pharmacologic agents can augment fracture union. If these pharmacologic approaches could be translated into clinical benefit and offered to patients with osteoporosis or ... [more ▼]

Pre-clinical studies indicate that pharmacologic agents can augment fracture union. If these pharmacologic approaches could be translated into clinical benefit and offered to patients with osteoporosis or patients with other risks for impaired fracture union (e.g. in subjects with large defects or open fractures with high complication rate), they could provide an important adjunct to the treatment of fractures. However, widely accepted guidelines are important to encourage the conduct of studies to evaluate bioactive substances, drugs, and new agents that may promote fracture union and subsequent return to normal function. A consensus process was initiated to provide recommendations for the clinical evaluation of potential therapies to augment fracture repair in patients with meta- and diaphyseal fractures. Based on the characteristics of fracture healing and fixation, the following study objectives of a clinical study may be appropriate: a) acceleration of fracture union, b) acceleration of return to normal function and c) reduction of fracture healing complications. The intended goal(s) should determine subsequent study methodology. While an acceleration of return to normal function or a reduction of fracture healing complications in and of themselves may be sufficient primary study endpoints for a phase 3 pivotal study, acceleration of fracture union alone is not. Radiographic evaluation may either occur at multiple time points during the healing process with the aim of measuring the time taken to reach a defined status (e.g. cortical bridging of three cortices or disappearance of fracture lines), or could be obtained at a single pre-determined timepoint, were patients are expected to reach a common clinical milestone (i.e. pain free full weight-bearing in weight-bearing fracture cases). Validated Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO's) measures will need to support the return to normal function co-primary endpoints. If reduction of complication rate (e.g. non-union) is the primary objective, the anticipated complications must be defined in the study protocol, along with their possible associations with the specified fracture type and fixation device. The study design should be randomized, parallel, double-blind, and placebo-controlled, and all fracture subjects should receive a standardized method of fracture fixation, defined as Standard of Care. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of symptomatic slow-acting drugs in osteoarthritis using the GRADE system.
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Burlet, Nansa; Delmas, Pierre D et al

in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders (2008), 9

BACKGROUND: Symptomatic slow-acting drugs (SYSADOA) have been largely studied over the last decade. The objective of this study is to prepare a document providing recommendations for the use of SYSADOA in ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Symptomatic slow-acting drugs (SYSADOA) have been largely studied over the last decade. The objective of this study is to prepare a document providing recommendations for the use of SYSADOA in osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: The following interventions were taken into consideration: avocado/soybean unsaponifiables, chondroitin sulfate, diacereine, glucosamine sulfate, hyaluronic acid, oral calcitonin, risedronate, strontium ranelate. Recommendations were based on the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. The GRADE system is based on a sequential assessment of the quality of evidence, followed by assessment of the balance between benefits versus downsides and subsequent judgment about the strength of recommendations. RESULTS: Chondroitin sulfate, diacereine, glucosamine sulfate, avocado/soybean unsaponifiables and hyaluronic acid have demonstrated pain reduction and physical function improvement with very low toxicity, with moderate to high quality evidence. Even if pre-clinical data and some preliminary in vivo studies have suggested that oral calcitonin and strontium ranelate could be of potential interest in OA, additional well-designed studies are needed. CONCLUSION: In the benefit/risk ratio, the use of chondroitin sulfate, diacereine, glucosamine sulfate, avocado/soybean unsaponifiables and hyaluronic acid could be of potential interest for the symptomatic management of OA. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and tolerability of intravenous ibandronate injections in postmenopausal osteoporosis: 2-year results from the DIVA study.
Eisman, John A; Civitelli, Roberto; Adami, Silvano et al

in Journal of Rheumatology (2008), 35(3), 488-97

OBJECTIVE: An effective and well tolerated intravenous (IV) bisphosphonate could provide a new treatment method for patients with osteoporosis. The Dosing IntraVenous Administration (DIVA) study was ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: An effective and well tolerated intravenous (IV) bisphosphonate could provide a new treatment method for patients with osteoporosis. The Dosing IntraVenous Administration (DIVA) study was designed to identify the optimal ibandronate IV injection schedule for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis by comparing the efficacy and tolerability of 2- and 3-monthly injections with the previously evaluated daily oral ibandronate regimen. We report the effects on lumbar spine and proximal femur bone mineral density (BMD) and bone resorption markers over 2 years. METHODS: This randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, noninferiority study recruited 1395 women (aged 55-80 yrs; > or = 5 yrs since menopause) with osteoporosis [mean lumbar spine (L2-L4) BMD T-score < -2.5 and > or = -5.0]. Patients received IV ibandronate (2 mg every 2 mo or 3 mg every 3 mo) plus daily oral placebo, or 2.5 mg daily oral ibandronate plus 2- or 3-monthly IV placebo. Supplemental vitamin D (400 IU) and calcium (500 mg) were provided throughout the 2-year study. RESULTS: At 2 years, the 2- and 3-monthly IV regimens achieved statistically noninferior and also superior increases in lumbar spine BMD compared with the daily regimen (6.4% and 6.3% vs 4.8%, respectively; p < 0.001). Greater increases were also obtained with IV ibandronate versus daily in proximal femur BMD. Serum concentrations of the biochemical marker of bone resorption C-telopeptide of the alpha-chain of type I collagen were reduced to a similar extent in all treatment arms (53.4%-59.9%). The tolerability profile of the IV regimens was similar to that observed with daily oral therapy. CONCLUSION: Ibandronate IV injections are an effective and well tolerated treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis and provide a useful alternative to oral dosing. [less ▲]

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See detailOsteonecrosis of the jaw and bisphosphonate treatment for osteoporosis.
Rizzoli, Rene; Burlet, Nansa; Cahall, David et al

in BONE (2008), 42(5), 841-7

A potential side effect associated with bisphosphonates, a class of drugs used in the treatment of osteoporosis, Paget's disease and metastatic bone disease, is osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). The ... [more ▼]

A potential side effect associated with bisphosphonates, a class of drugs used in the treatment of osteoporosis, Paget's disease and metastatic bone disease, is osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). The incidence of ONJ in the general population is unknown; this rare condition also may occur in patients not receiving bisphosphonates. Case reports have discussed ONJ development in patients with multiple myeloma or metastatic breast cancer receiving bisphosphonates as palliation for bone metastases. These patients are also receiving chemotherapeutic agents that might impair the immune system and affect angiogenesis. The incidence or prevalence of ONJ in patients taking bisphosphonates for osteoporosis seems to be very rare. No causative relationship has been unequivocally demonstrated between ONJ and bisphosphonate therapy. A majority of ONJ occurs after tooth extraction. Furthermore, the underlying risk of developing ONJ may be increased in osteoporotic patients by comorbid diseases. Treatment for ONJ is generally conservative. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of long-term strontium ranelate treatment on the risk of nonvertebral and vertebral fractures in postmenopausal osteoporosis: Results of a five-year, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Felsenberg, Dieter; Boonen, Steven et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2008), 58(6), 1687-95

OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to assess the effect of strontium ranelate on nonvertebral and vertebral fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis in a 5-year, double-blind, placebo ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to assess the effect of strontium ranelate on nonvertebral and vertebral fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis in a 5-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. METHODS: A total of 5,091 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis were randomized to receive either strontium ranelate at 2 gm/day or placebo for 5 years. The main efficacy criterion was the incidence of nonvertebral fractures. In addition, incidence of hip fractures was assessed, by post hoc analysis, in the subset of 1,128 patients who were at high risk of fractures (age 74 years or older with lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density T scores -2.4 or less). The incidence of new vertebral fractures was assessed, using the semiquantitative method described by Genant, in the 3,646 patients in whom spinal radiography (a nonmandatory procedure) was performed during the course of the study. Fracture data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier survival method. RESULTS: Of the 5,091 patients, 2,714 (53%) completed the study up to 5 years. The risk of nonvertebral fracture was reduced by 15% in the strontium ranelate group compared with the placebo group (relative risk 0.85 [95% confidence interval 0.73-0.99]). The risk of hip fracture was decreased by 43% (relative risk 0.57 [95% confidence interval 0.33-0.97]), and the risk of vertebral fracture was decreased by 24% (relative risk 0.76 [95% CI 0.65-0.88]) in the strontium ranelate group. After 5 years, the safety profile of strontium ranelate remained unchanged compared with the 3-year findings. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis with strontium ranelate results in a sustained reduction in the incidence of osteoporotic nonvertebral fractures, including hip fractures, and vertebral fractures over 5 years. [less ▲]

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See detailIncrease in femoral neck bone mineral density is associated with decrease in hip fracture incidence during treatment with strontium ranelate
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Delmas, Pierre D; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2006, November), 54(Suppl), 586

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See detailIntravenous ibandronate injections in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis - One-year results from the dosing intravenous administration study
Delmas, Pierre D.; Adami, Silvano; Strugala, Cezary et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2006), 54(6), 1838-1846

Objective. Although oral bisphosphonates are effective treatments for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, oral dosing may be unsuitable for some patients. An efficacious intravenously administered ... [more ▼]

Objective. Although oral bisphosphonates are effective treatments for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, oral dosing may be unsuitable for some patients. An efficacious intravenously administered bisphosphonate could be beneficial for such patients. Ibandronate, a potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, can be administered using extended dosing intervals, either orally or by rapid intravenous injection. The aim of this study was to identify the optimal intravenous dosing regimen for ibandronate in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Methods. In a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, phase III, noninferiority study, we compared 2 regimens of intermittent intravenous injections of ibandronate (2 mg every 2 months and 3 m g every 3 months) with a regimen of 2.5 mg of oral ibandronate daily, the latter of which has proven antifracture efficacy. The study group comprised 1,395 women (ages 55-80 years) who were at least 5 years postmenopausal. All patients had osteoporosis (lumbar spine [L2-L4] bone mineral density [BMD] T score less than -2.5). Participants also received daily calcium (500 mg) and vitamin D (400 IU). The primary end point was change from baseline in lumbar spine BMD at 1 year. Changes in hip BMD and in the level of serum C-telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) were also measured, as were safety and tolerability. Results. At 1 year, mean lumbar spine BMD increases were as follows: 5.1% among 353 patients receiving 2 mg of ibandronate every 2 months, 4.8% among 365 patients receiving 3 mg of ibandronate every 3 months, and 3.8% among 377 patients receiving 2.5 mg of oral ibandronate daily. Both of the intravenous regimens not only were noninferior, but also were superior (P < 0.001) to the oral regimen. Hip BMD increases (at all sites) were also greater in the groups receiving medication intravenously than in the group receiving ibandronate orally. Robust decreases in the serum CTX level were observed in all arms of the study. Both of the intravenous regimens were well tolerated and did not compromise renal function. Conclusion. As assessed by BMD, intravenous injections of ibandronate (2 mg every 2 months or 3 mg every 3 months) are at least as effective as the regimen of 2.5 mg orally daily, which has proven antifracture efficacy, and are well tolerated. [less ▲]

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See detailRelations between increase in femoral neck bone mineral density and decrease in hip fracture incidence during treatment with strontium ranelate
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Delmas, Pierre D; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre et al

in Osteoporosis International (2006, March), 17(Suppl.1), 96

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See detailA new concept for bisphosphonate therapy: a rationale for the development of monthly oral dosing of ibandronate
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Felsenberg, Dieter; Cooper, Cyrus et al

in Osteoporosis International (2006), 17(2), 159-166

Oral daily and weekly bisphosphonates represent the current mainstay of treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO). However, the inconvenience of frequent dosing is known to negatively affect ... [more ▼]

Oral daily and weekly bisphosphonates represent the current mainstay of treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO). However, the inconvenience of frequent dosing is known to negatively affect adherence to therapy in the long term. This has prompted the development of convenient oral bisphosphonate regimens that feature simple, less frequent dosing schedules. Such regimens require high potency agents, which can be given at low effective doses and that also have good tolerability. Ibandronate is a potent, nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate with proven efficacy when given intermittently to estrogen-depleted beagle dogs, rats and cynomolgus monkeys. Clinically, a pivotal prospective study has established that oral ibandronate has significant vertebral fracture efficacy in PMO, whether given daily (2.5 mg) or intermittently (20 mg every other day for 12 doses every 3 months; extended between-dose interval > 2 months). Both oral regimens were well tolerated, which is noteworthy as patients with a history of gastrointestinal (GI) disturbance were not specifically excluded. As a result of these findings, a large, multinational, randomized, double-blind study (Monthly Oral iBandronate In LadiEs: MOBILE) is currently exploring the non-inferiority of once-monthly oral ibandronate (100 or 150 mg) to the oral daily ibandronate (2.5 mg) regimen with proven anti-fracture efficacy, in terms of lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) change. As with the trials investigating the weekly administration of other bisphosphonates, vertebral fracture efficacy will be inferred if the study demonstrates the non-inferiority of once-monthly ibandronate to the proven oral daily regimen in terms of spinal BMD change. The availability of this once-monthly ibandronate regimen is expected to offer benefits in terms of convenience (by having to follow dosing recommendations once a month vs. once daily or weekly) and potentially tolerability (by reducing the potential for upper GI irritation that can result from frequent, repeated exposure). Greater convenience and tolerability may enhance the therapy adherence and, hence, improve long-term therapeutic outcomes in PMO. [less ▲]

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See detailMonthly oral ibandronate therapy in postmenopausal osteoporosis: 1-year results from the MOBILE study
Miller, Paul D.; McClung, Michael R.; Macovei, Liviu et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2005), 20(8), 1315-1322

Introduction: Suboptimal adherence to daily and weekly oral bisphosphonates can potentially compromise therapeutic outcomes in postmenopausal osteoporosis. Although yet to be prospectively shown in ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Suboptimal adherence to daily and weekly oral bisphosphonates can potentially compromise therapeutic outcomes in postmenopausal osteoporosis. Although yet to be prospectively shown in osteoporosis, evidence from randomized clinical trials in several other chronic conditions shows that reducing dosing frequency enhances therapeutic adherence. Ibandronate is a new and potent bisphosphonate with antifracture efficacy proven for daily administration and also intermittent administration with a dose-free interval of > 2 months. This report presents comparative data on the efficacy and safety of monthly and daily oral ibandronate regimens. Materials and Methods: MOBILE is a 2-year, randomized, double-blind, phase III, noninferiority trial. A total of 1609 women with postmenopausal osteoporosis were assigned to one of four oral ibandronate regimens: 2.5 mg daily, 50 mg/50 mg monthly (single doses, consecutive days), 100 mg monthly, or 150 mg monthly. Results: After 1 year, lumbar spine BMD increased by 3.9%, 4.3%, 4.1%, and 4.9% in the 2.5, 50/50, 100, and 150 mg arms, respectively. All monthly regimens were proven noninferior, and the 150 mg regimen superior, to the daily regimen. All monthly regimens produced similar hip BMD gains, which were larger than those with the daily regimen. All regimens similarly decreased serum levels of C-telopeptide, a biochemical marker of bone resorption. Compared with the daily regimen, a significantly larger proportion of women receiving the 100 and 150 mg monthly regimens achieved predefined threshold levels for percent change from baseline in lumbar spine (6%) or total hip BMD (3%). All regimens were similarly well tolerated. Conclusions: Monthly ibandronate is at least as effective and well tolerated as the currently approved daily ibandronate regimen in postmenopausal osteoporosis. [less ▲]

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See detailMonthly oral ibandronate is at least as effective as daily oral ibandronate: 1-year results from MOBILE
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Cooper, Cyrus; Miller, P. D. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 81-82

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See detailThe management of postmenopausal osteoporosis: a position paper of the world health origination collaborating center on public health aspects of rheumatic diseases
Delmas, Pierre D; Khaltaev, N.; Arriagada, M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 47

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See detailRecommendations for the registration of agents to be used in the prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis: updated recommendations from the Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science.
Abadie, Eric ULg; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Ringe, Johann D. et al

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2005), 35(1), 1-4

OBJECTIVES: The Group for the Respect and Excellence in Science (GREES) has reviewed and updated their recommendations for clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of new chemical entities to ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: The Group for the Respect and Excellence in Science (GREES) has reviewed and updated their recommendations for clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of new chemical entities to be used in the treatment and prevention of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP). METHODS: Consensus discussion of the committee. RESULTS: With the exception of steroid use posttransplantation, there is no need to differentiate between underlying diseases. Prevention and treatment for GIOP are dependent on exposure to glucocorticoids rather than T-scores as in postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO). If fracture data are obtained for PMO, it need not be repeated for GIOP, relying instead on bone mineral density (BMD) trials of at least 1 year. GREES recommends several changes in the previous guidance for GIOP. The committee saw no need to repeat preclinical studies if those have been previously done to assure bone quality in PMO. Similarly, phase I and phase II trials, if careful dose selection has been done for PMO, should not be repeated. The "prevention" and "treatment" claims should remain. Since the most recent evidence suggests significant increase in fracture risk for daily doses of prednisone of 5 mg/day or equivalent, clinical trials should concentrate on patients receiving at least this daily dosage. The emergence of bisphosphonates as the reference treatment, together with the rapid bone loss and high fracture incidence in glucocorticoid users, necessitates recommending a noninferiority trial design with lumbar spine BMD as the primary endpoint after 1 year. CONCLUSIONS: Registration of new chemical entities to be used in the management of GIOP should be granted, based on a 1-year noninferiority trial, using BMD as primary outcome and alendronate or risedronate as comparator. Demonstration of antifracture efficacy should have been previously demonstrated in PMO. [less ▲]

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