References of "Delille, Bruno"
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See detailMeasurements of air-ice CO2 fluxes over artificial sea ice emphasize the role of bubbles in gas transport
Kotovitch, Marie ULg; Moreau, Sébastion; Zhou, Jiayun et al

Poster (2015, March)

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See detailImaging air filled porosity in sea ice cover: Implication for sea ice permeability and gas exchange at the ice-atmosphere interface
Crabeck, O,; Galley, R,; Else, B, et al

Poster (2015, March)

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See detailPhotosynthesis-irradiance response curves revealed active sympagic communities in the Weddell Sea Winter, 2013
Rintala, J.-M.; Luhtanen, A.-M.; Enberg, S. et al

Poster (2015, March)

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See detailBlue sky and green bugs – How physical parameters and algal speciation influence DMSP and DMS profiles in Antarctic winter sea ice
Uhlig, C.; Rintala, J.-M.; Tison, J.-L. et al

Poster (2015, March)

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See detailThe role of sea ice in the carbon cycle of Polar Seas: 1D to 3D modelling
Moreau, S.; Vancoppenolle, M.; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

Poster (2015, March)

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See detailIsolation of cultivable viruses from Antarctic wintertime sea ice
Luhtanen, A.-M.; Bamford, D.; De Jong, J. et al

Poster (2015, March)

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See detailHow snow affects air-sea ice CO2 fluxes ?
Delille, Bruno ULg; Kotovitch, Marie ULg; Van Der Linden, Fanny ULg et al

Poster (2015, March)

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See detailDrivers of inorganic carbon dynamics in first-year sea ice: A model study.
Moreau, Sebastien; Vancoppenolle, Martin; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Oceans (2014)

Sea ice is an active source or a sink for carbon dioxide (CO2), although to what extent is not clear. Here, we analyze CO2 dynamics within sea ice using a one-dimensional halo-thermodynamic sea ice model ... [more ▼]

Sea ice is an active source or a sink for carbon dioxide (CO2), although to what extent is not clear. Here, we analyze CO2 dynamics within sea ice using a one-dimensional halo-thermodynamic sea ice model including gas physics and carbon biogeochemistry. The ice-ocean fluxes and vertical transport of total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) are represented using fluid transport equations. [less ▲]

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See detailMid-winter freeze experiment in the Arctic Ocean: Norwegian Young sea ICE cruise (N-ICE2015)
Nomura, Daiki; Granskog, Mats A.; Fransson, Agneta et al

Poster (2014, December 02)

In mid-January 2015, RV Lance will freeze into the ice north of Svalbard, Arctic Ocean at around 83.25°N 30°E, and passively drift with the ice as part of the Norwegian Young sea ICE cruise (N-ICE2015 ... [more ▼]

In mid-January 2015, RV Lance will freeze into the ice north of Svalbard, Arctic Ocean at around 83.25°N 30°E, and passively drift with the ice as part of the Norwegian Young sea ICE cruise (N-ICE2015). Judging from historic sea ice drift trajectories, it is likely that RV Lance will drift in a SW direction and the ship will probably be freed from the ice in mid spring after about two to three months of drift. Thereafter, RV Lance will return to her starting position and start a new drift. Under all circumstances, the ice drift project will end in late June 2015. Throughout the cruise the focus will be on the interaction of the atmosphere-ice-ocean system and the response of the marine ecosystem to the thinner ice regime. The overall goal of the project team is to improve our understanding of the role of the younger ice pack in the Arctic on greenhouse gas fluxes and to ultimately assess whether the Arctic Ocean is a sink or source of greenhouse gases. We plan to conduct long-term synchronous observations of Arctic snow and sea ice biogeochemistry and physics and fluxes of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and bromoform. This work targets at filling a crucial gap in our understanding of the role of Arctic sea ice in the climate system. This is done by conducting state of the art observations on Arctic sea ice in the polar night, when observations are basically non-existent. Further we are focusing on the new thinner ice regime, which is even less documented. We aim to understand how the thinner sea ice in the Arctic basin contributes (i) to important greenhouse gas exchange between the atmosphere and ocean and (ii) to aerosol formation, that contribute to the radiative balance of the planet. This work will increase direct collaboration between Japanese and European scientists in the Arctic, and combines complimentary expertise and experience from several international partners to carry out the interdisciplinary work proposed. [less ▲]

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See detailAtmosphere - surface fluxes estimated from different measurement techniques over snow covered sea ice
Sørensen, L.L; Delille, Bruno ULg; Jensen, B. et al

Conference (2014, December)

Carbon dioxide flux measurements in ecosystem science are mostly conducted over terrestrial areas by eddy covariance technique or the closed chamber method. Both methods are becoming more frequently used ... [more ▼]

Carbon dioxide flux measurements in ecosystem science are mostly conducted over terrestrial areas by eddy covariance technique or the closed chamber method. Both methods are becoming more frequently used over ice and snow covered surfaces. Comparisons between eddy covariance and chamber methods have been carried out over terrestrial surfaces, but carefully designed inter calibration experiments over sea ice and snow are still needed to assess differences and uncertainties. Here we present one of the first comparisons of fluxes over snow covered sea ice estimated from the eddy covariance technique and the chamber method. The measurements were carried out at Young Sound in Northeast Greenland from May 28th to June 28th 2014 starting just before snow started to melt. The comparison shows in general higher fluxes obtained by the eddy covariance method however the disagreement varies depending on meteorological and surface parameters. The flux divergence in relation to varying parameters will be presented and possible causes will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysical and bacterial controls on inorganic nutrients and dissolved organic carbon during a sea ice growth and decay experiment
Zhou, Jiayun ULg; Delille, Bruno ULg; Kaartokallio, Hermanni et al

in Marine Chemistry (2014), 166

We investigated how physical incorporation, brine dynamics and bacterial activity regulate the distribution of inorganic nutrients and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in artificial sea ice during a 19-day ... [more ▼]

We investigated how physical incorporation, brine dynamics and bacterial activity regulate the distribution of inorganic nutrients and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in artificial sea ice during a 19-day experiment that included periods of both ice growth and decay. The experiment was performed using two series of mesocosms: the first consisted of seawater and the second consisted of seawater enriched with humic-rich river water. We grew ice by freezing the water at an air temperature of -14 °C for 14 days after which ice decay was induced by increasing the air temperature to -1 °C. Using the ice temperatures and bulk ice salinities, we derived the brine volume fractions, brine salinities and Rayleigh numbers. The temporal evolution of these physical parameters indicate that there was a succession of 3 stages in the brine dynamics: forced-convection, followed by bottom convection during ice growth, and then brine stratification during ice decay. The major findings are: (1) the incorporation of dissolved compounds (nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, phosphate, silicate, and DOC) into the sea ice was not conservative (relative to salinity) during ice growth. Brine convection clearly influenced the incorporation of the dissolved compounds, since the non-conservative behavior of the dissolved compounds was particularly pronounced in the absence of brine convection. (2) Bacterial activity further regulated nutrient availability in the ice: ammonium and nitrite accumulated as a result of remineralization processes, although bacterial production was too low to induce major changes in DOC concentrations. (3) Different forms of DOC have different properties and hence incorporation efficiencies. In particular, the terrestrially-derived DOC from the river water was less efficiently incorporated into sea ice than the DOC in the seawater. Therefore the main factors regulating the distribution of the dissolved compounds within sea ice are clearly a complex interaction of brine dynamics, biological activity and in the case of dissolved organic matter, the physico-chemical properties of the dissolved constituents themselves. [less ▲]

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See detailCO2 fluxes across the air-ice interface
Delille, Bruno ULg

Conference (2014, July)

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See detailUsuing the Arctic Environment Test Basin to study the dynamics of dissolved organic matter in sea ice
Thomas, D.N.; Zhou, Jiayun ULg; Kaartokallio, H. et al

Conference (2014, July)

This is a report from the INTERICE 5 project that used the Arctic Environment Test Basin at HSVA from 21 May to 19 June 2012. The overarching aim was to investigate the physical and biological controls of ... [more ▼]

This is a report from the INTERICE 5 project that used the Arctic Environment Test Basin at HSVA from 21 May to 19 June 2012. The overarching aim was to investigate the physical and biological controls of dissolved organic matter incorporation into growing sea ice and the effect of melting once the ice had consolidated. Measurements were also made on the CO2 fluxes at the ice surface in relation to the chemical and biological changes taking place in the ice. The Interice 5 team was a multidisciplinary group of glaciologists, chemists and microbiologists from Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Germany and U.K. They were able to build on the experiences of previous INTERICE 2, 3 & 4 projects to maximize the opportunities from the facility. The preliminary results from the experiment will be presented, in the context of what is known about these processes from field campaigns. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysical controls on the storage of methane in landfast sea ice
Zhou, Jiayun ULg; Tison, J.-L.; Carnat, G. et al

in Cryosphere (The) (2014), 8(3), 1019-1029

We report on methane (CH4) dynamics in landfast sea ice, brine and under-ice seawater at Barrow in 2009. The CH4 concentrations in under-ice water ranged between 25.9 and 116.4 nmol L-1sw, indicating a ... [more ▼]

We report on methane (CH4) dynamics in landfast sea ice, brine and under-ice seawater at Barrow in 2009. The CH4 concentrations in under-ice water ranged between 25.9 and 116.4 nmol L-1sw, indicating a supersaturation of 700 to 3100 % relative to the atmosphere. In comparison, the CH4 concentrations in sea ice, ranged between 3.4 and 17.2 nmol L-1ice, and the deduced CH4 concentrations in brine, between 13.2 and 677.7 nmol L-1brine. We investigated on the processes explaining the difference in CH4 concentrations between sea ice, brine and the under-ice water, and suggest that biological controls on the storage of CH4 in ice was minor in comparison to the physical controls. Two physical processes regulated the storage of CH4 in our landfast ice samples: bubble formation within the ice and sea ice permeability. Gas bubble formation from solubility changes had favoured the accumulation of CH4 in the ice at the beginning of ice growth. CH4 retention in sea ice was then twice as efficient as that of salt; this also explains the overall higher CH4 concentrations in brine than in the under-ice water. As sea ice thickened, gas bubble formation became less efficient, CH4 was then mainly trapped in the dissolved state. The increase of sea ice permeability during ice melt marked the end of CH4 storage. [less ▲]

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See detailSnow cover and short-term synoptic events drive biogeochemical dynamics in winter Weddell Sea pack ice (AWECS cruise - June to August 2013)
Tison, J.-L.; Delille, Bruno ULg; Dieckmann, G. et al

Conference (2014, March)

This paper presents the preliminary results of an integrated multidisciplinary study of pack ice biogeochemistry in the Weddell Sea during the winter 2013 (June-August). The sea ice biogeochemistry group ... [more ▼]

This paper presents the preliminary results of an integrated multidisciplinary study of pack ice biogeochemistry in the Weddell Sea during the winter 2013 (June-August). The sea ice biogeochemistry group was one of the components of the AWECS (Antarctic Winter Ecosystem and Climate Study) cruise (Polarstern ANTXXIX-6). A total of 12 stations were carried out by the sea ice biogeochemistry group, which collected a suite of variables in the fields of physics, inorganic chemistry, gas content and composition, microbiology, biogeochemistry, trace metals and the carbonate system in order to give the best possible description of the sea ice cover and its interactions at interfaces. Samples were collected in the atmosphere above (gas fluxes), in the snow cover, in the bulk ice (ice cores), in the brines (sackholes) and in the sea water below (0m, 1m, 30 m). Here we present the results of basic physico-chemical (T°, bulk ice salinity, brine volumes, brine salinity, Rayleigh numbers) and biological (Chla) measurements in order to give an overview of the general status of the Weddell Sea winter pack ice encountered, and discuss how it controls climate relevant biogeochemical processes. Our results from the first set of 9 stations, mainly sampled along the Greenwich meridian and the easternmost part of the Weddell Sea definitively refute the view of a biogeochemically “frozen” sea ice during the Winter. This has already been demonstrated for the Spring and Summer, but we now see that sea ice sustains considerable biological stocks and activities throughout the Winter, despite the reduced amount of available PAR radiation. Accretion of the snow cover appears to play an essential role in driving biogeochemical activity, through warming from insulation, thus favouring brine transport, be it through potential convection, surface brine migration (brine tubes) or flooding. This results in a “widening” of the internal autumn layer (quite frequent in this rafting-dominated sea ice cover) and increase of the chla burden with age. Results from the second set of 3 stations in the western branch of the Weddell Sea gyre confirm that it comprises a mixture of older fast/second year ice floes with younger first-year ice floes. The older ice had the highest Chla concentrations of the entire cruise (>200 mgl-1), in an internal community enclosed within desalinized impermeable upper and lower layers. The first-year ice differs from that in the eastern Weddell Sea as it is dominated by columnar ice and (weak) algal communities are only found on the bottom or near the surface (no internal maximum). [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigating iron and organic matter incorporation in growing sea ice
Janssens, J.; Delille, Bruno ULg; de Jong et al

Conference (2014, March)

High concentration of exopolysacharides (EPS) and iron have been found in sea ice surrounding the Antarctic continent. However, the mechanisms leading to that enrichment remain unclear. Scavenging of iron ... [more ▼]

High concentration of exopolysacharides (EPS) and iron have been found in sea ice surrounding the Antarctic continent. However, the mechanisms leading to that enrichment remain unclear. Scavenging of iron by organic matter in seawater and entrainment during sea ice formation are thought to be responsible for the accumulation of iron in sea ice. EPS could also play a role in the iron passive chelative scavenging process in sea ice and in the increase of iron bioavailability. Our study investigates the processes responsible for the accumulation of iron (dissolved, particulate and total dissolvable iron), EPS, dissolved and particulate organic matter, macro-nutrients (silicic acid, nitrate and nitrite, phosphoric acid and ammonium), chlorophyll a and sea ice algae in young sea ice during an Australian-lead spring voyage off East Antarctica (SIPEX II September – November 2012) and a German-lead winter voyage to the Weddell Sea (AWECS June – August 2013). We used a combination of field- (“in situ”) and laboratory- based sea ice growth time-series experiments. In addition different types of newly formed sea ice as pancake ice, grey ice, frost flowers and slush were collected during both voyages as a means to compare and validate the experimental data. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the biogeochemical properties of newly formed Antarctic pack ice samples in the winter. Ice temperature, salinity and textures are also presented to support the biogeochemical observations at the onset of sea ice formation. [less ▲]

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See detailSea ice CO2 flux in the Southern Ocean during mid-winter and early spring
Nomura, D.; Delille, Bruno ULg; Dieckmann, G.S. et al

Conference (2014, March)

There seems little doubt that sea ice is permeable to CO2 and other gases although air–sea ice gas flux is more or less inhibited at a brine volume fraction of less than 5% representing the threshold for ... [more ▼]

There seems little doubt that sea ice is permeable to CO2 and other gases although air–sea ice gas flux is more or less inhibited at a brine volume fraction of less than 5% representing the threshold for fluid permeability of sea ice. Generally, air–sea ice CO2 flux is at its minimum in winter due to low sea ice temperatures and consequently reduced permeability despite the fact the partial pressure of CO2 in sea ice is usually high at that time and sea ice has therefore the potential to release CO2 to the atmosphere. Here, we present first evidence that snow laden Antarctic sea ice can act as source for atmospheric CO2 even during mid-winter and early spring. During a mid-winter cruise to the Weddell Sea (AWECS, 2013) and an early spring cruise off east Antarctica (SIPEX-2, 2012), due to thick insulating snow covers, the bottom of the snow and the surface of the sea ice were relatively warm (>–10°C) even though air temperature was sometimes below –30°C. In addition, in both areas, sea ice was characterized by high bulk-salinities, resulting in brine volume fractions that are generally higher than 5%. Automatic “open-closed” chamber measurements indicated positive CO2 fluxes of up to +2.5 mmol C m–2 day–1, illustrating that sea ice acted as a source of atmospheric CO2. Higher fluxes were measured at bare ice surfaces after removing the snow. However, generally low snow densities (mean: 339 kg m–3), indicating a permeable snow cover, facilitated degassing of CO2 at the snow-air interface. Our results therefore suggest that even in the winter and early spring, Antarctic sea ice can act as CO2 source for the atmosphere, particularly in areas with a thick insulating snow cover. [less ▲]

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See detailYear Round survey of Ocean-Sea Ice-Air Exchanges – the YROSIAE survey
Delille, Bruno ULg; Haskell, T.; Champenois, Willy ULg et al

Conference (2014, March)

YROSIAE survey aimed to carry out a year-round survey of land-fast sea ice focusing on the study of sea ice physics and biogeochemistry in order to a) better understand and budget exchanges of energy and ... [more ▼]

YROSIAE survey aimed to carry out a year-round survey of land-fast sea ice focusing on the study of sea ice physics and biogeochemistry in order to a) better understand and budget exchanges of energy and matter across the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere interfaces during sea ice growth and decay and b) quantify their potential impact on fluxes of climate gases (CO2, DMS, CH4, N2O) to the atmosphere and on carbon and macro- nutrients and micro-nutrients export to the ocean. Ice cores, sea water, brines and exported material were collected at regular intervals about 1 km off cape Evans from November 2011 to December 2011 and from September 2012 to December 2012 in trace-metal clean conditions. Samples are processed to characterize both the vertical distribution and temporal changes of climate gases (CO2, DMS, CH4, N2O), CO2-related parameters (dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity and CaCO3 amount), physical parameters (salinity, temperature, texture, 18O), biogeochemical parameters (macro-nutrients, particulate and dissolved organic carbon, δ13C, δ30Si and δ15N, micro-nutrients - including iron) and biological parameters ( chlorophyll a, primary production within sea ice derived from O2:Ar and O2:N ratios, autotrophic species determination, bacterial cell counts a.s.o.). In addition, we deployed a micro-meterological tower and automatic chambers to measure air-ice CO2 fluxes. Continuous measurements of ice temperature and ice accretion or melting, both at the ice-ocean and the ice-atmosphere interfaces were provided by an “Ice-T” ice mass balance buoy. Sediment traps collected particles below the ice between 10 and 70 m, while dust collectors provided a record of a full suite of trace metal and dust at different levels above the ground. We will present the aims, overall approach and sampling strategy of the YROSIAE survey. In addition we will also discuss CO2 dynamics within the ice and present temporal air-ice CO2 fluxes over the year. We will provide a first budget of air-ice CO2 fluxes during ice growth for Antarctica sea ice and discuss the impact of the snow cover on air-ice CO2 fluxes. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the use of O2/Ar and O2/N2 to estimate the biological carbon uptake in landfast sea ice
Zhou, Jiayun ULg; Delille, Bruno ULg; Brabant, F. et al

Poster (2014, March)

Sea ice is one of the largest biomes on Earth. The net community production (NCP) of the microorganisms living in sea ice impacts the dynamics of pCO2 in sea ice, and therefore the CO2 exchanges at the ... [more ▼]

Sea ice is one of the largest biomes on Earth. The net community production (NCP) of the microorganisms living in sea ice impacts the dynamics of pCO2 in sea ice, and therefore the CO2 exchanges at the air-ice-sea interfaces. As oxygen O2 and carbon C are both involved in the photosynthetic and respiration processes, one can theoretically assess NCP (in terms of C uptake) from O2 measurements. However, the concentration of O2 in sea ice depends not only on biological processes (i.e., NCP) but also on physical processes. We present a technique for assessing NCP in sea ice, based on the use of the O2/Ar ratio, which should correct for the physical contribution in O2 variations. We also compare the use of O2/Ar and O2/N2 for deriving NCP, and demonstrate that O2/Ar is more suitable, as it is more sensitive and less affected by gas diffusion and gas bubble formation during sea ice growth and decay than O2/N2. Using O2/Ar, we then provide conservative estimates of NCP in landfast sea ice, from ice cores collected in Barrow, from January through June 2009. The minimum estimate of the NCP in the whole ice cover reached 229 mg C.m-².d-1 in late spring. This is about 20 times higher than the atmospheric C uptake at that time identified from CO2 fluxes measurements at the ice-air interface, and therefore indicates that the main source of C used in the NCP was from the under-ice water. [less ▲]

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