References of "Delhaye, Emma"
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See detailBridging novelty and familiarity-based recognition memory: a matter of timing
Delhaye, Emma ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege; Moulin, Christopher et al

in Visual Cognition (in press)

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See detailMisrecollection prevents older adults from benefitting from semantic relatedness of the memoranda in associative memory
Delhaye, Emma ULiege; Tibon, Roni; Gronau, Nurit et al

in Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition (2017)

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See detailEvolution of fast familiarity and novelty decisions in aging
Delhaye, Emma ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege; Moulin, Christopher et al

Poster (2017)

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See detailTime course of familiarity and novelty decisions in aging
Delhaye, Emma ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege; Moulin, Christopher et al

Conference (2017)

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See detailL’impact des connaissances sémantiques préexistantes en mémoire associative dans le vieillissement normal
Folville, Adrien ULiege; Delhaye, Emma ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege

in Revue de Neuropsychologie, Neurosciences Cognitives et Cliniques (2016), 8(4), 253-260

The formation of a global and complex episodic memory requires memory for single units of information of the target event but also binding these elements together. This binding capacity diminishes in ... [more ▼]

The formation of a global and complex episodic memory requires memory for single units of information of the target event but also binding these elements together. This binding capacity diminishes in healthy aging leading to a so-called associative memory deficit. Interestingly, when support is provided during encoding thanks to semantic prior-knowledge (e.g., semantically related word pairs), this associative deficit can be alleviated. The aim of the present review is to summarize the current literature about the influence of prior-knowledge on associative memory performance in healthy aging. Through an analysis of the procedures that have been used in associative memory studies, we suggest two factors that appear to modulate the impact of prior knowledge on older adults’ associative memory. First, the way word pairs are recombined from the encoding to the retrieval phase is the main factor that has to be taken into account. Conditions that promote recall-to-reject discrimination processes lead to similar performance in older compared to younger adults, whereas conditions that require recollection discrimination lead to an age-related decline. Second, the nature of the semantic relations involved in the prior-knowledge support may influence older adults’ performance by modulating the contribution of recollection and familiarity to recognition. Indeed, categorical semantic relations engage both recollection and familiarity-based discrimination, whereas thematic relations allow participants to rely on familiarity-based discrimination only. This latest observation is crucial when one considers recollection as a declining process, in contrast to familiarity, which remains spared in healthy aging. Therefore, future studies should explore the propensity of other semantic relations to alleviate the age-related associative memory decline. [less ▲]

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See detailBridging familiarity and novelty detection: a matter of timing?
Delhaye, Emma ULiege; Barbeau, Emmanuel; Moulin, Christopher et al

Conference (2016, July 21)

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See detailSemantic relatedness of the memoranda prevents older adults from benefitting from unitization
Delhaye, Emma ULiege; Tibon, Roni; Gronau, Nurit et al

Poster (2016)

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See detailThe impact of aging on associative memory for pre-existing unitized associations
Delhaye, Emma ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege

in Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition (2016)

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See detailBridging familiarity and novelty detection: a matter of timing?
Delhaye, Emma ULiege; Barbeau, Emmanuel; Moulin, Christopher et al

in Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Memory (2016)

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See detailBridging familiarity-based recognition memory and novelty detection: A matter of timing
Delhaye, Emma ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege; Moulin, Christopher et al

Poster (2015)

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See detailIntégration perceptive et mémoire épisodique dans la maladie d'Alzheimer
Delhaye, Emma ULiege

Master's dissertation (2014)

Binding (i.e., to link different components together) is a key mechanism for episodic memory formation. Normal aging is characterized by a decrease in episodic memory for associations. However ... [more ▼]

Binding (i.e., to link different components together) is a key mechanism for episodic memory formation. Normal aging is characterized by a decrease in episodic memory for associations. However, associative memory performance can be improved and age-related differences can even be suppressed when associations are unitized, that is when they are encoded as an integrated whole. A previous study in Alzheimer's disease (AD) showed that patients do not benefit from this particular type of encoding in episodic memory, so that their performance for unitized representations remains very poor. The aim of the current study was to assess whether the unitization mechanism itself (i.e., to integrate components into a whole) is impaired in AD or whether a global memory impairment affects all kinds of representations (unitized and non-unitized). We evaluated this hypothesis in fifteen mild Alzheimer patients and twenty healthy control participants. To systematically increase the demands on unitization, pictures of objects and animals were either left intact, separated into two fragments, or separated into four fragments. Participants viewed the pictures and had to unitize them first in order to recognize it and judge whether it would fit into a shoebox. In a subsequent recognition test where all pictures were intact, they had to retrieve pictures they saw earlier. An analysis of correct recognition of studied pictures showed a significant interaction between group and fragmentation level, indicating a decrease in Alzheimer patients’ performance compared to control participants for pictures that were fragmented at study but not for pictures that were intact at encoding. These findings suggest that the perceptual mechanism of unitization of fragmented stimuli is impaired in Alzheimer's disease. [less ▲]

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See detailExploration of unitization processes in episodic memory in Alzheimer's disease
Delhaye, Emma ULiege; Salmon, Eric ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014)

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