References of "Delcenserie, Véronique"
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See detailShort communication: Evaluation of the microbiota of kefir samples using metagenetic analysis targeting the 16S and 26S ribosomal DNA fragments
Korsak Koulagenko, Nicolas ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Leclercq, Mathilde et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (in press)

Milk kefir is produced by fermenting milk in the presence of kefir grains. This beverage has several benefits for human health. The aim of this experiment was to analyze 5 kefir grains (and their products ... [more ▼]

Milk kefir is produced by fermenting milk in the presence of kefir grains. This beverage has several benefits for human health. The aim of this experiment was to analyze 5 kefir grains (and their products) using a targeted metagenetic approach. Of the 5 kefir grains analyzed, 1 was purchased in a supermarket, 2 were provided by the Ministry of Agriculture (Namur, Belgium), and 2 were provided by individuals. The metagenetic approach targeted the V1-V3 fragment of the 16S ribosomal (r)DNA for the grains and the resulting beverages at 2 levels of grain incorporation (5 and 10%) to identify the bacterial species population. In contrast, the 26S rDNA pyrosequencing was performed only on kefir grains with the aim of assessing the yeast populations. In parallel, pH measurements were performed on the kefir obtained from the kefir grains using 2 incorporation rates. Regarding the bacterial population, 16S pyrosequencing revealed the presence of 20 main bacterial species, with a dominance of the following: Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Gluconobacter frateurii, Lactobacillus kefiri, Acetobacter orientalis, and Acetobacter lovaniensis. An important difference was noticed between the kefir samples: kefir grain purchased from a supermarket (sample E) harbored a much higher proportion of several operational taxonomic units of Lactococcus lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. This sample of grain was macroscopically different from the others in terms of size, apparent cohesion of the grains, structure, and texture, probably associated with a lower level of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens. The kefir (at an incorporation rate of 5%) produced from this sample of grain was characterized by a lower pH value (4.5) than the others. The other 4 samples of kefir (5%) had pH values above 5. Comparing the kefir grain and the kefir, an increase in the population of Gluconobacter in grain sample B was observed. This was also the case for Acetobacter orientalis in sample D. In relation to 26S pyrosequencing, our study revealed the presence of 3 main yeast species: Naumovozymaspp., Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Kazachastania khefir. For Naumovozyma, further studies are needed to assess the isolation of new species. In conclusion, this study has proved that it is possible to establish the patterns of bacterial and yeast composition of kefir and kefir grain. This was only achieved with the use of high-throughput sequencing techniques. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of oregano (Origanum heracleoticum) essential oil and carvacrol on virulence gene transcription by Escherichia coli O157:H7
Mith, Hasika; Clinquart, Antoine ULg; Zhiri, Abdesselam et al

in FEMS Microbiology Letters (2015), 362

The aim of the current study was to determine, via reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis, the effect of oregano essential oil (Origanum heracleoticum) and ... [more ▼]

The aim of the current study was to determine, via reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis, the effect of oregano essential oil (Origanum heracleoticum) and carvacrol, its major component, on the expression of virulence-associated genes in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 ATCC strain 35150. Both oregano oil and carvacrol demonstrated their efficacy firstly, by inhibiting the transcription of the ler gene involved in up regulation of the LEE2, LEE3 and LEE4 promoters and of attaching and effacing lesions and secondly by decreasing both Shiga toxin and fliC genes expression. In addition, a decrease in luxS gene transcription involved in quorum sensing was observed. These results were dose dependent and showed a specific effect of O. heracleoticum and carvacrol in downregulating the expression of virulence genes in EHEC O157:H7. These findings suggest that oregano oil and carvacrol have the potential to mitigate the adverse health effects caused by virulence gene expression in EHEC O157: [less ▲]

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See detailStudy of the microbial flora of steak tartare by metagenomic approach
Korsak Koulagenko, Nicolas ULg; Delhalle, Laurent ULg; Nezer, Carine et al

Poster (2014, May 06)

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See detailGenome encyclopaedia of type strains of the genus Bifidobacterium
Milani, Christian; Lugli, Gabriele; Duranti, Sabrina et al

in Applied and Environmental Microbiology (2014)

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See detailInvestigation of the evolutionary development of the genus bifidobacterium by comparative genomics
Lugli, Gabriele; Milani, Christian; Turroni, Francesca et al

in Applied and Environmental Microbiology (2014)

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See detailValidation of real-time PCR for detection of six major pathogens in seafood products
Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Korsak Koulagenko, Nicolas ULg; Lemaire et al

in Food Control (2014), 44

Seafood can pose a public health concern to consumers. It is often consumed rawand may be contaminated with several foodborne pathogens. In order to guarantee the safety of seafood, real-time polymerase ... [more ▼]

Seafood can pose a public health concern to consumers. It is often consumed rawand may be contaminated with several foodborne pathogens. In order to guarantee the safety of seafood, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocols may be used as these enable results to be provided within 24 h. The first goal of our work was to develop real-time PCR protocols enabling the detection of six foodborne pathogens that may be present in seafood products (Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus). The corresponding gene targets were: 50S/VS1, rfbE, ttr, tlh, and vvp. A multiplex PCR was also developed to detect the virulence genes of V. parahaemolyticus: tdh and trh. A total of 420 bacterial strains belonging to four different genera/strains were used in this study. Sensitivity and specificity were always 100%, except in the case of Salmonella spp., where three strains were not detected by our PCR protocols. The second objective of our work was to assess the detection limit of our real-time PCR protocols on artificially contaminated seafood products (raw shrimps, cooked shrimps, and raw mussels), purchased in public stores. Six different levels of contamination were assayed in four replicates for each matrix. The real-time PCR protocols enabled a better level of detection than the ISO methods, except for Salmonella in raw shrimps and for V. vulnificus in shrimps (raw and cooked). The estimated level of detection was between 1 and 47 cfu/25 g sample for the ISO norms and between 1 and 315 cfu/25 g sample for the realtime PCR protocols tailored in our work. The real-time PCRs developed in our work allowed for good selectivity, sensitivity, and specificity. The sensitivity on seafood products was estimated at a level of 100%, except for Salmonella (97%). In the spiking assays, the levels of detection were lower with the real-time PCR protocol than those obtained with the ISO method. This was not the case for V. vulnificus in raw and cooked shrimps and for Salmonella in raw shrimps. These real-time PCR protocols appear to be good alternative methods for surveillance of seafood products to ensure the absence of foodborne pathogens. One additional conclusion is that laboratories have to use enrichment media that are compatible with those recommended by ISO standards. This may facilitate the isolation of the pathogen if the real-time PCR protocol gives a suspect positive signal during the first step of the seafood analysis. [less ▲]

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See detailMicrobiota characterization of a protected designation of origin Belgian cheese: Herve cheese, using metagenomic analysis.
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Delhalle, Laurent ULg et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2014), 97

Herve cheese is a Belgian soft cheese with a washed rind, and is made from raw or pasteurized milk. The specific microbiota of this cheese has never previously been fully explored and the use of raw or ... [more ▼]

Herve cheese is a Belgian soft cheese with a washed rind, and is made from raw or pasteurized milk. The specific microbiota of this cheese has never previously been fully explored and the use of raw or pasteurized milk in addition to starters is assumed to affect the microbiota of the rind and the heart. The aim of the study was to analyze the bacterial microbiota of Herve cheese using classical microbiology and a metagenomic approach based on 16S ribosomal DNA pyrosequencing. Using classical microbiology, the total counts of bacteria were comparable for the 11 samples of tested raw and pasteurized milk cheeses, reaching almost 8 log cfu/g. Using the metagenomic approach, 207 different phylotypes were identified. The rind of both the raw and pasteurized milk cheeses was found to be highly diversified. However, 96.3 and 97.9% of the total microbiota of the raw milk and pasteurized cheese rind, respectively, were composed of species present in both types of cheese, such as Corynebacterium casei, Psychrobacter spp., Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Staphylococcus equorum, Vagococcus salmoninarum, and other species present at levels below 5%. Brevibacterium linens were present at low levels (0.5 and 1.6%, respectively) on the rind of both the raw and the pasteurized milk cheeses, even though this bacterium had been inoculated during the manufacturing process. Interestingly, Psychroflexus casei, also described as giving a red smear to Raclettetype cheese, was identified in small proportions in the composition of the rind of both the raw and pasteurized milk cheeses (0.17 and 0.5%, respectively). In the heart of the cheeses, the common species of bacteria reached more than 99%. The main species identified were Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Psychrobacter spp., and Staphylococcus equorum ssp. equorum. Interestingly, 93 phylotypes were present only in the raw milk cheeses and 29 only in the pasteurized milk cheeses, showing the high diversity of the microbiota. Corynebacterium casei and Enterococcus faecalis were more prevalent in the raw milk cheeses, whereas Psychrobacter celer was present in the pasteurized milk cheeses. However, this specific microbiota represented a low proportion of the cheese microbiota. This study demonstrated that Herve cheese microbiota is rich and that pasteurized milk cheeses are microbiologically very close to raw milk cheeses, probably due to the similar manufacturing process. The characterization of the microbiota of this particular protected designation of origin cheese was useful in enabling us to gain a better knowledge of the bacteria responsible for the character of this cheese. [less ▲]

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See detailProbiotics and health claims in Europe
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg

Conference (2013, November 05)

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See detailGlucose decreases virulence gene expression of Escherichia coli O157:H7
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; LaPointe, Gisèle; Charaslertrangsi, Tumnoon et al

in Journal of Food Protection (2012)

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See detailBovine milk fat globule membrane affects virulence expression in Escherichia coli O157:H7
Tellez, Angela; Corredig, Milena; Guri, Anilda et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2012)

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See detailBifidobacterium pseudolongum are efficient indicators of animal fecal contamination in raw milk cheese industry
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; Gavini, Françoise; China, Bernard et al

in BMC Microbiology (2011), 11(178),

Background: The contamination of raw milk cheeses (St-Marcellin and Brie) from two plants in France was studied at several steps of production (raw milk, after addition of rennet - St-Marcellin - or after ... [more ▼]

Background: The contamination of raw milk cheeses (St-Marcellin and Brie) from two plants in France was studied at several steps of production (raw milk, after addition of rennet - St-Marcellin - or after second maturation - Brie -, after removal from the mold and during ripening) using bifidobacteria as indicators of fecal contamination. Results: Bifidobacterium semi-quantitative counts were compared using PCR-RFLP and real-time PCR. B. pseudolongum were detected in 77% (PCR-RFLP; 1.75 to 2.29 log cfu ml-1) at the different production steps) and 68% (real-time PCR; 2.19 to 2.73 log cfu ml-1) of St-Marcellin samples and in 87% (PCR-RFLP; 1.17 to 2.40 log cfu ml-1) of Brie cheeses samples. Mean counts of B. pseudolongum remained stable along both processes. Two other populations of bifidobacteria were detected during the ripening stage of St-Marcellin, respectively in 61% and 18% of the samples (PCR-RFLP). The presence of these populations explains the increase in total bifidobacteria observed during ripening. Further characterization of these populations is currently under process. Forty-eight percents (St-Marcellin) and 70 % (Brie) of the samples were B. pseudolongum positive / E. coli negative while only 10 % (St-Marcellin) and 3 % (Brie) were B. pseudolongum negative / E. coli positive. Conclusions: The increase of total bifidobacteria during ripening in Marcellin’s process does not allow their use as fecal indicator. The presence of B. pseudolongum along the processes defined a contamination from animal origin since this species is predominant in cow dung and has never been isolated in human feces. B. pseudolongum was more sensitive as an indicator than E. coli along the two different cheese processes. B. pseudolongum should be used as fecal indicator rather than E. coli to assess the quality of raw milk and raw milk cheeses. Results: Bifidobacterium semi-quantitative counts were compared using PCR-RFLP and real-time PCR. Bif. pseudolongum were detected in 77% (PCR-RFLP; 1.75 to 2.29 log cfu ml-1) at the different production steps) and 68% (real-time PCR; 2.19 to 2.73 log cfu ml-1) of St-Marcellin samples and in 87% (PCR-RFLP; 1.17 to 2. 40 log cfu ml-1) of Brie cheeses samples. Mean counts of Bif. pseudolongum remained stable along both processes. Two other populations of bifidobacteria were detected during the ripening stage of St-Marcellin, respectively in 61% and 18% of the samples (PCR-RFLP). The presence of these populations explains the increase in total bifidobacteria observed during ripening. Further identification of these species is currently under process. Forty-eight percents (St-Marcellin) and 70 % (Brie) of the samples were Bif. pseudolongum positive / E. coli negative while only 10 % (St-Marcellin) and 3 % (Brie) were Bif. pseudolongum negative / E. coli positive. Conclusions: The increase of total bifidobacteria during ripening in Marcellin’s process does not allow their use as fecal indicator. The presence of Bif. pseudolongum along the processes defined a contamination from animal origin since this species is predominant in cow dung and has never been isolated in human feces. Bif. pseudolongum was more sensitive as an indicator than E. coli along the two different cheese processes. Bif. pseudolongum should be used as fecal indicator rather than E. coli to assess the quality of raw milk and raw milk cheeses. [less ▲]

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See detailGenome comparison of Bifidobacterium longum strains NCC2705 and CRC-002 using suppression subtractive hybridization.
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; Lessard, Marie*-Helene; LaPointe, Gisele et al

in FEMS Microbiology Letters (2008), 280(1), 50-6

Because probiotic effects are strain dependent, genomic explanations of these differences will contribute to understanding their mechanisms of action. The genomic sequence of the Bifidobacterium longum ... [more ▼]

Because probiotic effects are strain dependent, genomic explanations of these differences will contribute to understanding their mechanisms of action. The genomic sequence of the Bifidobacterium longum probiotic strain NCC2705 was determined, but little is known about the genetic diversity between strains of this species. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) is a powerful method for generating a set of DNA fragments differing between two closely related bacterial strains. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic differences between genomes of B. longum strains NCC2705 and CRC-002 using PCR-based SSH. Strain CRC-002 produces exopolysaccharides whereas NCC2705 is not known for reliable exopolysaccharide production. Thirty-five and 30 different sequences were obtained from the SSH libraries of strains CRC-002 and NCC2705, respectively. Specific CRC-002 genes found were predicted to be involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides and metabolism of other carbohydrates, and these genes were not present in the genome of strain NCC2705. The identification of an endo-1,4-beta-xylanase gene in the CRC-002 SSH library is an important difference because xylanase genes have previously been proposed as a defining characteristic of the NCC2705 strain. The results demonstrate that the SSH technique was useful to highlight potential genes involved in complex sugar metabolism that differ between the two probiotic strains. [less ▲]

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