References of "Delcenserie, Véronique"
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See detailIn vitro screening of mare's milk antimicrobial effect and antiproliverative activity.
Guri, Anilda; Paligot, Michèle; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULg et al

in FEMS Microbiology Letters (2016)

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See detailExploring the bacterial diversity of Belgian steak tartare using metagenetics and qPCR analysis
Delhalle, Laurent ULg; Korsak Koulagenko, Nicolas ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg et al

in Journal of Food Protection (2016), 79(2), 200-229

Steak tartare is a popular meat dish in Belgium. It is prepared with raw ground minced beef and eaten with sauce, vegetables, and spiced. Since it contains raw meat, steak tartare is highly prone to ... [more ▼]

Steak tartare is a popular meat dish in Belgium. It is prepared with raw ground minced beef and eaten with sauce, vegetables, and spiced. Since it contains raw meat, steak tartare is highly prone to bacterial spoilage. The objective of this study was to explore the bacterial flora diversity in steak tartare in Belgium according to the source and to determine which bacteria are able to grow during the shelf life. A total of 58 samples from butchers’ shops, restaurants, sandwich shops and supermarkets were collected. These samples were analyzed using 16S rDNA metagenetics, a classical microbiological technique, and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) targeting the Lactobacillus genus. Samples were analyzed at the beginning and at the end of their shelf life, except for those from restaurants and sandwich shops analyzed only at the purchase date. Metagenetic analysis identified up to 180 bacterial species and 90 genera in some samples. But only seven bacterial species were predominant in the samples, depending on the source: Brochothrix thermosphacta, Lactobacillus algidus, Lactococcus piscium, Leuconostoc gelidum, Photobacterium kishitani, Pseudomonas spp. and Xanthomonas oryzae. With this work, an alternative method is proposed to evaluate the total flora in food samples based on the number of reads from metagenetic analysis and the results of qPCR. The degree of underestimation of aerobic plate counts (APCs) at 30°C estimated with the classical microbiology method was demonstrated in comparison with the proposed culture independent method. Compared to culture-based methods, metagenetic analysis combined with qPCR targeting Lactobacillus provides valuable information for characterizing the bacterial flora of raw meat. [less ▲]

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See detailOptmization of culture media for Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium crudilactis and study of the antimicrobial effect of culture supernatants
Bondue, Pauline ULg; Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULg et al

Poster (2015, October)

Complex oligosaccharides from human milk (HMO) contribute to infant health. Bifidobacteriumbifidum mainly found in breast-fed infant microbiota has all the enzymatic machinery for degradation of HMO. On ... [more ▼]

Complex oligosaccharides from human milk (HMO) contribute to infant health. Bifidobacteriumbifidum mainly found in breast-fed infant microbiota has all the enzymatic machinery for degradation of HMO. On the other hand, whey is rich in complex bovin milk oligosaccharides (BMO) very similar to HMO, including 3’-sialyllactose (3’SL). They are very likely to be metabolised by B. bifidum too, but also by B. crudilactis, a bovine origin strain. Fermentation of HMO or BMO by bifidobacteria can result in production of metabolites modulating virulence expression of several pathogenic bacteria. Two strains of bifidobacteria were used in this study: B. bifidum, isolated from breastfed infant feces and B. crudilactis, isolated from bovine raw milk. The ability of those strains to metabolise culture media enriched in glucose, whey and 3’SL has been assessed. Then, the obtained culture supernatant has been tested against virulence genes expression of E. coli O157:H7.  Both strains were able to grow in presence of BMO and 3’SL. B. crudilactis presented the best growth on all media. All culture supernatants obtained after supplementation with 3’SL resulted in significant under-expression of genes ler and qseA. The trend of genes stxB2 and luxS was also toward a down-regulation. BMO combined to some bovine or human origin bifidobacteria strains could be interesting synbiotics to maintain or restore the intestinal health of young children. These effects observed in vitro require further investigations to ensure repeatability in humans and to identify the exact nature of molecules obtained from fermentation media by B. bifidum and B. crudilactis. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of 16S rDNA Metagenetics and classical Microbiology to Assess the bacterial superficial Contamination Patterns in Bovines Classically Slaughtered or following the Halal Ritual
Korsak Koulagenko, Nicolas ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Hupperts, Caroline et al

Poster (2015, June 17)

In Belgium and in several European countries, two cattle slaughtering protocols exist: the classical method, that encompasses a stunning step before the sticking procedure, and the halal method, combining ... [more ▼]

In Belgium and in several European countries, two cattle slaughtering protocols exist: the classical method, that encompasses a stunning step before the sticking procedure, and the halal method, combining the stunning and the sticking in one single step. The main difference lies in the fact that, in the halal protocol, a single cut with a sharp knife is practiced directly on live cattle, instead of two cutting steps with two different knives for the sticking in the classical slaughtering technique. The unique section in the halal technique results generally in the cross section of trachea and esophagus of cattle. The aim of this study was to seek if the two slaughtering techniques were similar regarding the superficial contamination of carcasses, swabbed between 2 and 4 hours after the killing step. For this purpose, classical microbiological tests (TVC and Enterobacteriaceae) and 16S rDNA metagenetic analysis were carried out from 20 cattle carcasses (swabbing of “legal” zone – 1.600 cm2 – and in the neck area – 200 cm2). The classical microbiological results revealed no significant differences between the two slaughtering practices. Statistical analysis of pyrosequencing data showed that differences in bacterial population abundance between slaughtering methods were mainly found in the “legal” swabbing zone compared to the neck area. Bacterial genera belonging to Actinobacteria (Brevibacterium, Corynebacterium) were more aundant in “Halal” samples whereas populations from the Proteobacteria (Caulobacteraceae, Comamonadaceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae) and Firmicutes (Lactobacillus) were more abundand in the “classical” group. The analysis of OTU abundance of bacteria from the digestive or respiratory tract revealed no differences beteween groups. In conclusion, the slaughtering method does not influence the superficial microbiological pattern in terms of specific microbiological markers of the digestive or respiratory tract. However, precise analysis to the genus level underlines differences between methods, the legal swabbing zone being still the best sampling zone compared to the neckline. The next step will be the identification of precise contamination origin of the differences found between slaughtering methods. [less ▲]

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See detailOptimisation de milieux de culture pour Bifidobacterium bifidum et Bifidobacterium crudilactis et étude de l’effet antimicrobien des surnageants de culture
Bondue, Pauline ULg; Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULg et al

Poster (2015, June)

Modulé entre autre par notre alimentation, le microbiote intestinal influence notre santé. Un enfant allaité sera en meilleure santé qu’un enfant nourri avec des formulations commerciales. Ceci est ... [more ▼]

Modulé entre autre par notre alimentation, le microbiote intestinal influence notre santé. Un enfant allaité sera en meilleure santé qu’un enfant nourri avec des formulations commerciales. Ceci est notamment dû à la présence d’oligosaccharides complexes dans le lait maternel (HMO). Les oligosaccharides ajoutés au lait maternisé sont d’origine végétale et leur structure est très éloignée de celle des HMO. Parce que les HMO ressemblent aux glycans de la paroi épithéliale, les pathogènes intestinaux infantiles s’y fixent et sont expulsés naturellement. Le lait de vache possède des oligosaccharides complexes (BMO), dont la structure est très similaire à celle des HMO. Les bifidobactéries rencontrées majoritairement dans les matières fécales d’un nourrisson devraient pouvoir métaboliser les BMO, tout comme celles isolées dans le lait de vache. Les objectifs de cette étude étaient d’étudier le potentiel de croissance de bifidobactéries d’origine bovine ou humaine sur des milieux de culture enrichis en lactosérum et BMO. Le deuxième objectif était de vérifier si le catabolisme de ces sucres complexes induisaient une synthèse de métabolites influençant l’expression de virulence de certains pathogènes tels qu’Escherichia coli O157 :H7. Une souche de Bifidobacterium bifidum, isolée à partir des matières fécales d’un nourrisson exclusivement allaité et une souche de Bifidobacterium crudilactis, isolée à partir de fromage au lait cru, ont été mises en culture dans des milieux contenant différentes sources d’hydrates de carbone (glucose, lactosérum naturellement riche en lactose et BMO, et 3’-syalillactose (3’SL)). Le 3’SL est un oligosaccharide complexe majoritaire parmi les BMO. Les surnageants des différents milieux de culture ont été prélevés et concentrés par lyophilisation puis mis en contact avec E. coli O157 :H7. L’expression relative de différents gènes de virulence d’E. coli O157:H7, fliC, ler, stx2b et luxS a été étudiée. Dans le futur, les BMO et certaines souches d’origine bovine ou humaine pourraient s’avérer être des compléments alimentaires intéressants pour maintenir ou rétablir la santé intestinale des jeunes enfants. [less ▲]

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See detailGenome of Bifidobacteria and Carbohydrate Metabolism
Bondue, Pauline ULg; Delcenserie, Véronique ULg

in Korean Journal for Food Science of Animal Resources (2015)

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See detailAntimicrobial Effects of Bifidobacteria from Human and Animal Origin
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg

Scientific conference (2015)

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See detailShort communication: Evaluation of the microbiota of kefir samples using metagenetic analysis targeting the 16S and 26S ribosomal DNA fragments
Korsak Koulagenko, Nicolas ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Leclercq, Mathilde et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2015), 98

Milk kefir is produced by fermenting milk in the presence of kefir grains. This beverage has several benefits for human health. The aim of this experiment was to analyze 5 kefir grains (and their products ... [more ▼]

Milk kefir is produced by fermenting milk in the presence of kefir grains. This beverage has several benefits for human health. The aim of this experiment was to analyze 5 kefir grains (and their products) using a targeted metagenetic approach. Of the 5 kefir grains analyzed, 1 was purchased in a supermarket, 2 were provided by the Ministry of Agriculture (Namur, Belgium), and 2 were provided by individuals. The metagenetic approach targeted the V1-V3 fragment of the 16S ribosomal (r)DNA for the grains and the resulting beverages at 2 levels of grain incorporation (5 and 10%) to identify the bacterial species population. In contrast, the 26S rDNA pyrosequencing was performed only on kefir grains with the aim of assessing the yeast populations. In parallel, pH measurements were performed on the kefir obtained from the kefir grains using 2 incorporation rates. Regarding the bacterial population, 16S pyrosequencing revealed the presence of 20 main bacterial species, with a dominance of the following: Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Gluconobacter frateurii, Lactobacillus kefiri, Acetobacter orientalis, and Acetobacter lovaniensis. An important difference was noticed between the kefir samples: kefir grain purchased from a supermarket (sample E) harbored a much higher proportion of several operational taxonomic units of Lactococcus lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. This sample of grain was macroscopically different from the others in terms of size, apparent cohesion of the grains, structure, and texture, probably associated with a lower level of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens. The kefir (at an incorporation rate of 5%) produced from this sample of grain was characterized by a lower pH value (4.5) than the others. The other 4 samples of kefir (5%) had pH values above 5. Comparing the kefir grain and the kefir, an increase in the population of Gluconobacter in grain sample B was observed. This was also the case for Acetobacter orientalis in sample D. In relation to 26S pyrosequencing, our study revealed the presence of 3 main yeast species: Naumovozymaspp., Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Kazachastania khefir. For Naumovozyma, further studies are needed to assess the isolation of new species. In conclusion, this study has proved that it is possible to establish the patterns of bacterial and yeast composition of kefir and kefir grain. This was only achieved with the use of high-throughput sequencing techniques. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of oregano (Origanum heracleoticum) essential oil and carvacrol on virulence gene transcription by Escherichia coli O157:H7
Mith, Hasika; Clinquart, Antoine ULg; Zhiri, Abdesselam et al

in FEMS Microbiology Letters (2015), 362

The aim of the current study was to determine, via reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis, the effect of oregano essential oil (Origanum heracleoticum) and ... [more ▼]

The aim of the current study was to determine, via reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis, the effect of oregano essential oil (Origanum heracleoticum) and carvacrol, its major component, on the expression of virulence-associated genes in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 ATCC strain 35150. Both oregano oil and carvacrol demonstrated their efficacy firstly, by inhibiting the transcription of the ler gene involved in up regulation of the LEE2, LEE3 and LEE4 promoters and of attaching and effacing lesions and secondly by decreasing both Shiga toxin and fliC genes expression. In addition, a decrease in luxS gene transcription involved in quorum sensing was observed. These results were dose dependent and showed a specific effect of O. heracleoticum and carvacrol in downregulating the expression of virulence genes in EHEC O157:H7. These findings suggest that oregano oil and carvacrol have the potential to mitigate the adverse health effects caused by virulence gene expression in EHEC O157: [less ▲]

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See detailStudy of the microbial flora of steak tartare by metagenomic approach
Korsak Koulagenko, Nicolas ULg; Delhalle, Laurent ULg; Nezer, Carine et al

Poster (2014, May 06)

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See detailAntimicrobial activities of commercial essential oils and their components against food-borne pathogens and food spoilage bacteria.
Mith, Hasika; Dure, Remi; Delcenserie, Véronique ULg et al

in Food science & nutrition (2014), 2(4), 403-16

This study was undertaken to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of 15 commercial essential oils and their main components in order to pre-select candidates for potential application in highly ... [more ▼]

This study was undertaken to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of 15 commercial essential oils and their main components in order to pre-select candidates for potential application in highly perishable food preservation. The antibacterial effects against food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7) and food spoilage bacteria (Brochothrix thermosphacta and Pseudomonas fluorescens) were tested using paper disk diffusion method, followed by determination of minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal (MBC) concentrations. Most of the tested essential oils exhibited antimicrobial activity against all tested bacteria, except galangal oil. The essential oils of cinnamon, oregano, and thyme showed strong antimicrobial activities with MIC >/= 0.125 muL/mL and MBC >/= 0.25 muL/mL. Among tested bacteria, P. fluorescens was the most resistant to selected essential oils with MICs and MBCs of 1 muL/mL. The results suggest that the activity of the essential oils of cinnamon, oregano, thyme, and clove can be attributed to the existence mostly of cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, thymol, and eugenol, which appear to possess similar activities against all the tested bacteria. These materials could be served as an important natural alternative to prevent bacterial growth in food products. [less ▲]

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See detailGenome encyclopaedia of type strains of the genus Bifidobacterium
Milani, Christian; Lugli, Gabriele; Duranti, Sabrina et al

in Applied and Environmental Microbiology (2014)

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See detailInvestigation of the evolutionary development of the genus bifidobacterium by comparative genomics
Lugli, Gabriele; Milani, Christian; Turroni, Francesca et al

in Applied and Environmental Microbiology (2014)

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See detailValidation of real-time PCR for detection of six major pathogens in seafood products
Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Korsak Koulagenko, Nicolas ULg; Lemaire et al

in Food Control (2014), 44

Seafood can pose a public health concern to consumers. It is often consumed rawand may be contaminated with several foodborne pathogens. In order to guarantee the safety of seafood, real-time polymerase ... [more ▼]

Seafood can pose a public health concern to consumers. It is often consumed rawand may be contaminated with several foodborne pathogens. In order to guarantee the safety of seafood, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocols may be used as these enable results to be provided within 24 h. The first goal of our work was to develop real-time PCR protocols enabling the detection of six foodborne pathogens that may be present in seafood products (Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus). The corresponding gene targets were: 50S/VS1, rfbE, ttr, tlh, and vvp. A multiplex PCR was also developed to detect the virulence genes of V. parahaemolyticus: tdh and trh. A total of 420 bacterial strains belonging to four different genera/strains were used in this study. Sensitivity and specificity were always 100%, except in the case of Salmonella spp., where three strains were not detected by our PCR protocols. The second objective of our work was to assess the detection limit of our real-time PCR protocols on artificially contaminated seafood products (raw shrimps, cooked shrimps, and raw mussels), purchased in public stores. Six different levels of contamination were assayed in four replicates for each matrix. The real-time PCR protocols enabled a better level of detection than the ISO methods, except for Salmonella in raw shrimps and for V. vulnificus in shrimps (raw and cooked). The estimated level of detection was between 1 and 47 cfu/25 g sample for the ISO norms and between 1 and 315 cfu/25 g sample for the realtime PCR protocols tailored in our work. The real-time PCRs developed in our work allowed for good selectivity, sensitivity, and specificity. The sensitivity on seafood products was estimated at a level of 100%, except for Salmonella (97%). In the spiking assays, the levels of detection were lower with the real-time PCR protocol than those obtained with the ISO method. This was not the case for V. vulnificus in raw and cooked shrimps and for Salmonella in raw shrimps. These real-time PCR protocols appear to be good alternative methods for surveillance of seafood products to ensure the absence of foodborne pathogens. One additional conclusion is that laboratories have to use enrichment media that are compatible with those recommended by ISO standards. This may facilitate the isolation of the pathogen if the real-time PCR protocol gives a suspect positive signal during the first step of the seafood analysis. [less ▲]

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See detailMicrobiota characterization of a protected designation of origin Belgian cheese: Herve cheese, using metagenomic analysis.
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Delhalle, Laurent ULg et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2014), 97

Herve cheese is a Belgian soft cheese with a washed rind, and is made from raw or pasteurized milk. The specific microbiota of this cheese has never previously been fully explored and the use of raw or ... [more ▼]

Herve cheese is a Belgian soft cheese with a washed rind, and is made from raw or pasteurized milk. The specific microbiota of this cheese has never previously been fully explored and the use of raw or pasteurized milk in addition to starters is assumed to affect the microbiota of the rind and the heart. The aim of the study was to analyze the bacterial microbiota of Herve cheese using classical microbiology and a metagenomic approach based on 16S ribosomal DNA pyrosequencing. Using classical microbiology, the total counts of bacteria were comparable for the 11 samples of tested raw and pasteurized milk cheeses, reaching almost 8 log cfu/g. Using the metagenomic approach, 207 different phylotypes were identified. The rind of both the raw and pasteurized milk cheeses was found to be highly diversified. However, 96.3 and 97.9% of the total microbiota of the raw milk and pasteurized cheese rind, respectively, were composed of species present in both types of cheese, such as Corynebacterium casei, Psychrobacter spp., Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Staphylococcus equorum, Vagococcus salmoninarum, and other species present at levels below 5%. Brevibacterium linens were present at low levels (0.5 and 1.6%, respectively) on the rind of both the raw and the pasteurized milk cheeses, even though this bacterium had been inoculated during the manufacturing process. Interestingly, Psychroflexus casei, also described as giving a red smear to Raclettetype cheese, was identified in small proportions in the composition of the rind of both the raw and pasteurized milk cheeses (0.17 and 0.5%, respectively). In the heart of the cheeses, the common species of bacteria reached more than 99%. The main species identified were Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Psychrobacter spp., and Staphylococcus equorum ssp. equorum. Interestingly, 93 phylotypes were present only in the raw milk cheeses and 29 only in the pasteurized milk cheeses, showing the high diversity of the microbiota. Corynebacterium casei and Enterococcus faecalis were more prevalent in the raw milk cheeses, whereas Psychrobacter celer was present in the pasteurized milk cheeses. However, this specific microbiota represented a low proportion of the cheese microbiota. This study demonstrated that Herve cheese microbiota is rich and that pasteurized milk cheeses are microbiologically very close to raw milk cheeses, probably due to the similar manufacturing process. The characterization of the microbiota of this particular protected designation of origin cheese was useful in enabling us to gain a better knowledge of the bacteria responsible for the character of this cheese. [less ▲]

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See detailProbiotics and health claims in Europe
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg

Conference (2013, November 05)

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See detailGlucose decreases virulence gene expression of Escherichia coli O157:H7
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; LaPointe, Gisèle; Charaslertrangsi, Tumnoon et al

in Journal of Food Protection (2012)

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