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See detailBarley (Hordeum distichon L.) roots produce volatile aldehydes via the lipoxygenase/hydroperoxide lyase pathway with a strong age-dependent pattern
Delory, Benjamin ULg; Delaplace, Pierre ULg; du Jardin, Patrick ULg et al

Conference (2014, August 13)

In chemical ecology, the roles played by root-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in biotic interactions and the quantitative analysis of such chemicals in root tissues remain poorly documented. In ... [more ▼]

In chemical ecology, the roles played by root-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in biotic interactions and the quantitative analysis of such chemicals in root tissues remain poorly documented. In this context, this study aims at using a fully automated gas chromatography – mass spectrometry methodology allowing both identification and accurate quantification of VOCs produced by roots of a monocotyledonous plant species at five selected developmental stages from germination to the end of tillering. Results show that barley roots mainly produce four volatile aldehydes, namely hexanal, (E)-hex-2-enal, (E)-non-2-enal and (E,Z)-nona-2,6-dienal. These molecules are well-known linoleic and linolenic acid derivatives produced via the lipoxygenase/hydroperoxide lyase pathway of higher plants. Our findings contrast with analyses documented on aboveground barley tissues that mainly emit C6 aldehydes, alcohols and their corresponding esters. Multivariate statistical analyses performed on individual VOC concentrations indicate quantitative changes in the volatile profile produced by barley roots according to plant age. Barley roots produced higher total and individual VOC concentrations when young seminal roots emerged from the coleorhizae compared to older phenological stages. Moreover, results also show that the C6/C9 volatile aldehyde ratio was the lowest at the end of tillering while the maximum mean value of this ratio was reached in seven day-old barley roots. [less ▲]

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See detailBelowground Chemical Ecology: The Case of Wireworms
Barsics, Fanny ULg; Delory, Benjamin ULg; Delaplace, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2014, June)

Wireworms, clock-beetles' larvae (Coleoptera, Elateridae), are below ground pests of many crops. They cause dramatic yield losses worldwide. Research on their ecology is crucial to undertake innovative ... [more ▼]

Wireworms, clock-beetles' larvae (Coleoptera, Elateridae), are below ground pests of many crops. They cause dramatic yield losses worldwide. Research on their ecology is crucial to undertake innovative management strategies. In the field of chemical ecology, multitrophic interactions occurring in the rhizosphere are gaining increasing attention from entomologists and agronomists. Our research aims at unveiling the role of volatile organic compounds (VOC) involved in wireworms' foraging behavior, putatively leading to host localization and/or host recognition. [less ▲]

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See detailTemperature regimes and aphid density interactions differentially influence VOC emissions in Arabidopsis
Hien, Truong Thi Dieu ULg; Delory, Benjamin ULg; Vanderplanck, Maryse et al

in Arthropod-Plant Interactions (2014)

The effects of volatile emissions from plants exposed to individual abiotic and biotic stresses are well documented. However, the influence of multiple stresses on plant photosynthesis and defense ... [more ▼]

The effects of volatile emissions from plants exposed to individual abiotic and biotic stresses are well documented. However, the influence of multiple stresses on plant photosynthesis and defense responses, resulting in a variety of volatile profiles has received little attention. In this study, we investigated how temperature regimes in the presence and absence of the sucking insect Myzus persicae affected volatile organic compound emissions in Arabidopsis over three time periods (0-24 h, 24-48 h, and 48-72 h). Headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to evaluate Arabidopsis volatile organic compounds. The results showed that under laboratory conditions, eight volatile classes [alcohols (mainly 2-ethyl-hexan-1-ol), ketone (6-methyl hept-5-en-2-one), esters (mainly (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate), aldehydes (mainly phenylacetaldehyde), isothiocyanates (mainly 4-methylpentyl isothiocyanate), terpenes (mainly (E,E)-α-farnesene), nitrile (5-(methylthio) pentanenitrile), and sulfide (dimethyl trisulfide)] were observed on plants exposed to stress combinations, whereas emissions of six volatile classes were observed during temperature stress treatments alone (with the exception of nitriles and sulfides). Aphid density at high temperature combinations resulted in significantly higher isothiocyanate, ester, nitrile and sulfide proportions. The results of the present study provide an insight into the effects of temperature - aphid interactions on plant volatile emissions. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of Metabolic Pathways Expressed by Pichia anomala KH6 in the Presence of the Pathogen Botrytis cinerea on Apple: New Possible Targets for Biocontrol Improvement
Kwasiborski, Anthony; Bajji, Mohammed; Renaut, J. et al

in PLoS ONE (2014), 9(3),

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See detail10. Perspectives - 2. Perspectives offertes par la culture en association de froment et de pois protéagineux d'hiver
Pierreux, Jérome ULg; Delaplace, Pierre ULg; Roisin, Christian et al

in Bodson, Bernard; Destain, Jean-Pierre (Eds.) Livre Blanc céréales (2014, February 26)

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See detailImpact of abiotic stresses on volatile organic compound production of field crops and grasslands
Digrado, Anthony ULg; Mozaffar, Ahsan ULg; Bachy, Aurélie ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

Abiotic and biotic stresses are known to alter biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emission from plants. With the climate and global change, BVOC emissions are likely to increase. This increase on ... [more ▼]

Abiotic and biotic stresses are known to alter biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emission from plants. With the climate and global change, BVOC emissions are likely to increase. This increase on BVOC emissions could be driven by many environmental parameters like temperature, ozone and light availability for photosynthesis although it is still difficult to predict the impact of some environmental parameters, environmental controls on BVOC emission being species and BVOC-dependent. These BVOC are involved in a wide range of interactions of plants with their environment and these interactions could be affected by the global change. Moreover, BVOC also play a key role in the atmospheric chemistry and may contribute to ozone formation and an increase in methane lifetime, strengthening the global change. Yet, due to technical limitation, there are few studies examining the impact of multiple co-occurring stresses on BVOC emission at the ecosystem level although stress combination is probably more ecologically realistic in field. In the CROSTVOC (for CROp STress VOC) project, the impact of abiotic stresses (e.g. heat, drought, ozone and grazing) on BVOC emission will be investigated for field crops (maize and wheat) and grassland both at the ecosystem and plant scale. [less ▲]

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See detailRhizobacterial volatile organic compounds implication in Brachypodium distachyon response to phosphorus deficiency
Baudson, Caroline ULg; Saunier de Cazenave-Mendaluk, Magdalena ULg; du Jardin, Patrick ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

In agriculture, phosphorus (P) is considered as the second most growth-limiting macronutrient after nitrogen. However, P fertilizers are produced from non-renewable resources. In this context, sustainable ... [more ▼]

In agriculture, phosphorus (P) is considered as the second most growth-limiting macronutrient after nitrogen. However, P fertilizers are produced from non-renewable resources. In this context, sustainable production strategies have to be developed to enhance P use efficiency of crops, e.g. based on naturally occurring biotic interactions that limit the negative impacts of P deficiency in soils. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) have already revealed their ability to promote plant growth and tolerance to abiotic stresses through many mechanisms. Among them, the bacterial volatile organic compounds-mediated communication between plants and PGPR is still poorly documented. Our research project aims at studying the capacity of a model cereal plant (Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv. Bd21) to face P deficiency in interaction with PGPR. The prerequisite of this project consists in characterizing Bd21 response to P deficiency by measuring plant biomass production and allocation, root system architecture, total phosphorus content, root-secreted and intracellular acid phosphatase activity under various P concentrations. Those results will allow us to define P-limiting conditions, in order to assess PGPR volatiles influence on plant response to P deficiency. This approach will use an ex-vitro co-cultivation system allowing volatiles-mediated interaction and should help us to unravel the ability of rhizobacterial volatiles to enhance plant tolerance to P deficiency. [less ▲]

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See detailQuantitative gas chromatography - mass spectrometry profiling of volatile organic compounds produced by barley (Hordeum distichon L.) roots according to plant age
Delory, Benjamin ULg; Delaplace, Pierre ULg; du Jardin, Patrick ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

In chemical ecology, the roles played by root-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in biotic interactions and the quantitative analysis of such chemicals in root tissues remain poorly documented. In ... [more ▼]

In chemical ecology, the roles played by root-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in biotic interactions and the quantitative analysis of such chemicals in root tissues remain poorly documented. In this context, this study aims at developing a fully automated analytical methodology allowing both identification and accurate quantification of VOCs produced by roots of a monocotyledon plant species. Briefly, VOC emitted by crushed barley roots are successively trapped by dynamic headspace sampling on Tenax TA adsorbents, thermally desorbed and cryofocused, separated by gas chromatography (GC) and finally analysed by mass spectrometry (MS) in both SCAN and selected ion monitoring modes. Results show that barley roots mainly produce four volatile aldehydes, namely hexanal, (E)-hex-2-enal, (E)-non-2-enal and (E,Z)-nona-2,6-dienal. These molecules are well-known linoleic (C18:2) and linolenic (C18:3) acid derivatives produced via the lipoxygenase and the hydroperoxide lyase pathways of higher plants. Our findings contrast with analyses documented on aboveground barley tissues that mainly emit C6 aldehydes, alcohols and their derivative esters. Moreover, preliminary results indicate quantitative changes in the volatile profile contained in barley roots according to plant age. Multivariate statistical analyses are currently underway to quantitatively assess these changes using plants at five selected developmental stages ranging from germination to the end of tillering. [less ▲]

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See detailarchiDART: a R package allowing root system architecture analysis using Data Analysis of Root Tracings (DART) output files
Delory, Benjamin ULg; Baudson, Caroline ULg; Brostaux, Yves ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

In 2010, Le Bot et al presented a free and open-access software (Data Analysis of Root Tracings - DART) allowing the analysis of complex root system architectures from captured images, particularly across ... [more ▼]

In 2010, Le Bot et al presented a free and open-access software (Data Analysis of Root Tracings - DART) allowing the analysis of complex root system architectures from captured images, particularly across time series. Using this software, a user has to manually identify roots as a set of links. After vectorization of a root system, three final data sets (RAC, TPS and LIE) can be exported as table files containing several attributes for (a) each individual root (e.g. root length), (b) each observation day or (c) each point used to construct the vectorized root system respectively. These data sets can finally be used either to calculate derived root system architecture (RSA) parameters or to draw the root system architecture at selected observation dates. However when an experiment involves the analysis and comparison of many root systems, the calculation of RSA parameters for each data set and the drawing of the corresponding vectorized root systems become time-consuming. In this context, we developed a R package, called archiDART, allowing both the automatic calculation of common root architecture parameters and the X-Y plotting of vectorized root systems for selected observation dates. [less ▲]

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See detailVOC emissions and protein expression mediated by the interactions between herbivorous insects and Arabidopsis plant. A review
Hien, Truong Thi Dieu ULg; Heuskin, Stéphanie ULg; Delaplace, Pierre ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2014), 18(3), 455-464

Herbivorous insects, such as phloem-sap feeders and chewers, induce resistance response in plants. There is a long-standing hypothesis that herbivores increase the emission of volatile organic compounds ... [more ▼]

Herbivorous insects, such as phloem-sap feeders and chewers, induce resistance response in plants. There is a long-standing hypothesis that herbivores increase the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the Arabidopsis plant model. However, most works were restricted to the study of the regulation of plant VOC emissions and only in some cases to the effects of insects on such emissions. Often these investigations do not establish a link between quantitative and qualitative emission of plant VOCs with actual damages caused by insects. Moreover, information remain limited about the processes that occur at the protein level encoded of the host plant under stress conditions. Here, we briefly summarize the effects of specific chewing and phloem-sap feeding insects on the emission of VOCs by Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0, and review some predictions about pathogenesis-related proteins, based on current evolutionary hypotheses. Further investigation of the effects of herbivorous insects on VOC emissions and protein expression is expected to improve our knowledge about their patterns and functions in plant responses to stresses. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of larval host plant experience and solanaceous plant volatile emissions in Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) host finding behavior
Caparros Megido, Rudy ULg; De Backer, Lara; Ettaïb, Refki et al

in Arthropod-Plant Interactions (2014)

The tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepi- doptera: Gelechiidae), is considered to be a major pest that damages tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L; Solanaceae) crops in South American, European, and ... [more ▼]

The tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepi- doptera: Gelechiidae), is considered to be a major pest that damages tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L; Solanaceae) crops in South American, European, and Mediterranean countries. This insect species is polyphagous (i.e., feeds on many types of food); hence, it could also develop on other cultivated host plants, principally solanaceous plants, such as potato (S. tuberosum L.; Solanaceae) and eggplant (S. melongena L.; Solanaceae). Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that host plant choice by adult T. absoluta is influenced by plant volatile organic compounds and larval host plant experience. One tomato cultivar (cv.) ‘Money- maker’ and three potato cv. ‘Charlotte’ ‘Bintje,’ and ‘Nicola’ were tested. Using a flying tunnel, we observed that females reared on tomato preferred flying toward tomato and, to a lesser extent, potato cv. ‘Charlotte.’ These preferences might be explained by the high release of terpenes by these two plants. When conducting oviposition choice assays, we found no preference between tomato and potato in the number of eggs laid by females that had been previously reared on either host plant. This study indicates that the host finding behavior of T. absoluta is mediated by solanaceous volatiles, while oviposition behavior appears to depend on additional stimuli. These results provide baseline information for use in the development of new control strategies against T. absoluta using semiochemicals and plant breeding. [less ▲]

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See detailPerspectives offertes par la culture en association de froment et de pois protéagineux d’hiver
Pierreux, Jérome ULg; Delaplace, Pierre ULg; Roisin, Christian et al

in Autonomie protéique et biométhanisation à la ferme (2013, November 27)

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See detailEmission of sulfur-containing volatiles from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh Col-0 related to diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella (L.)) infestation
Hien, Truong Thi Dieu ULg; Delaplace, Pierre ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg et al

Poster (2013, June 10)

Herbivore-infested plants often release a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Here, we studied the effects of feeding Plutella xylostella (L.) (0, 3, 9, 20 pest larvae within 0-4 h and 4-8 h ... [more ▼]

Herbivore-infested plants often release a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Here, we studied the effects of feeding Plutella xylostella (L.) (0, 3, 9, 20 pest larvae within 0-4 h and 4-8 h infestation, respectively) on the emission of sulfur-containing VOCs in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh Col-0 (A.t. Col-0) by headspace solid-phase micro-extraction coupled to gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS). The analytical results showed that the relative emission of sulfur-containing metabolites increased significantly in Arabidopsis plants subjected to P. xylostella infestation according to the density and residence duration of pest larvae on shoot organs. The main compound from infested plants was dimethyl disulfide. We suggest that the correlations between the stress level (density and time infestation) and the sulfides observed in this study provide a means to understand the changes of VOCs profile of plant under chewer infestation. [less ▲]

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See detailOptimaliser les systèmes de production des bioressources
Delaplace, Pierre ULg

Scientific conference (2013, May 07)

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