References of "Delabouglise, Alexis"
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Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluating the social costs and benefits of surveillance: the case of HPAI in Vietnam
Delabouglise, alexis; Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas ULg; Phan Dang, Thang et al

Conference (2014, May 08)

Economic evaluations of animal health surveillance systems are critical components of the assessment of their long-term sustainability and the improvement of their cost- effectiveness. Social costs and ... [more ▼]

Economic evaluations of animal health surveillance systems are critical components of the assessment of their long-term sustainability and the improvement of their cost- effectiveness. Social costs and benefits of health information release through the surveillance systems are fundamental determinants of the acceptability and efficacy of surveillance and are often neglected in the evaluation process. This study presents the evaluation of social costs and benefits of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) surveillance in Vietnam. Three field studies were conducted in the South and North of the country. Data on animal health information flow networks and social costs and benefits were collected using participatory approaches. Non-monetary costs and benefits were quantified using a newly developed tool based on stated choice method and participatory techniques. The study showed that private actors incur many transaction costs in reporting the information. However social costs mainly arise from price drops due to information release on market which has strong influences on the decision to disclose sanitary information. This applies at all levels including farmers and veterinary authorities. Private actors of the poultry sector valued information on occurring disease outbreaks, which is perceived as a social benefit. However avian influenza information is scarcely disclosed in private networks as stakeholders fear its potential impact on markets. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (0 ULg)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailModeling information sharing in animal health surveillance with social network analysis
Delabouglise, Alexis; Dao Thi, Hiep; Nguyen Tien, Thanh et al

Poster (2014, May 08)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (4 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailParticipatory approaches for evaluating surveillance systems: insights from a training- related study from Vietnam
Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas ULg; Vu, M.Q. Giao; Delabouglise, Alexis et al

Conference (2012, December)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (3 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe use of participatory approaches to evaluate the socio-economic factors impairing the efficacy of animal health surveillance systems
Delabouglise, Alexis; Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas ULg; Phan Dang, Thang ULg et al

Poster (2012, August)

The need to set up efficient and sustainable surveillance networks is a major concern which must be continually placed at the heart of the overall issue of development. In developing countries, the ... [more ▼]

The need to set up efficient and sustainable surveillance networks is a major concern which must be continually placed at the heart of the overall issue of development. In developing countries, the political priority to reduce poverty means that it is vital to include social aspects in public decision making on health management in general. This focus on social aspects can be considered all the more important regarding surveillance as it is deeply embedded in agents’ everyday life. The flow of information about animal health involves different non-monetary costs, ensuing from stigmatization or from social pressure to withhold or disclose information. Understanding, measuring and alleviating these social costs of information is required to ensure the effectiveness and viability of surveillance. The present study considers the case of highly pathogenic avian influenza surveillance in Vietnam. It aims at establishing a protocol allowing for understanding and quantifying social costs incurred by surveillance agents at the community level. In this prospect, tools and concepts from anthropology, participative epidemiology and experimental economics were combined. More particularly, social network analysis, participatory observation, companion modeling and stated preference surveys were applied for the thorough examination of constraints and costs of health information flows. The opportunity for the scaling-up of such methodologies and for the inclusion of the so-elicited quantitative values in socio-economic evaluation of surveillance systems are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (9 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of the social impact of HPAI surveillance network at the community level in Vietnam.
Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas ULg; Delabouglise, Alexis; Binot, Aurélie et al

Conference (2012, August)

The need to set up efficient and sustainable surveillance networks is a major concern which must be continually placed at the heart of the overall issue of development. In developing countries, the ... [more ▼]

The need to set up efficient and sustainable surveillance networks is a major concern which must be continually placed at the heart of the overall issue of development. In developing countries, the political priority to reduce poverty means that it is vital to include social aspects in public decision making on health management in general. This focus on social aspects can be considered all the more important regarding surveillance as it is deeply embedded in agents’ everyday life. The flow of information about animal health involves different non-monetary costs, ensuing from stigmatization or from social pressure to withhold or disclose information. Understanding, measuring and alleviating these social costs of information is required to ensure the effectiveness and viability of surveillance. The present study considers the case of highly pathogenic avian influenza surveillance in Vietnam. It aims at establishing a protocol allowing for understanding and quantifying social costs incurred by surveillance agents at the community level. In this prospect, tools and concepts from anthropology, participative epidemiology and experimental economics were combined. More particularly, social network analysis, participatory observation, companion modeling and stated preference surveys were applied for the thorough examination of constraints and costs of health information flows. The opportunity for the scaling-up of such methodologies and for the inclusion of the so-elicited quantitative values in socio-economic evaluation of surveillance systems are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (3 ULg)