References of "Dehon, Hedwige"
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See detailThe verbal overshadowing effect in children and adults is unrelated to the specific content of descriptions
Vanootighem, Valentine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Poster (2016, July 21)

Verbal descriptions of unfamiliar faces have been found to impair later identification of these faces in children and adults, a phenomenon known as the “verbal overshadowing effect” (VOE, Schooler and ... [more ▼]

Verbal descriptions of unfamiliar faces have been found to impair later identification of these faces in children and adults, a phenomenon known as the “verbal overshadowing effect” (VOE, Schooler and Engstler-Schooler, 1990). The present study thoroughly examined the person descriptive abilities of 7–8, 10–11, and 13–14-year-old children and adults and their influence on later identification performance. Our aim was to specifically assess the prediction of the “content” account suggesting that a verbal overshadowing arises because participants generate an inadequate verbal description and later rely upon it during retrieval. Results showed a verbal overshadowing effect in all age groups but neither accuracy, length nor content of descriptions were found to be associated with identification accuracy. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of individuals’ susceptibility to false memory induced by both DRM and misinformation paradigms involving emotional material
Martial, Charlotte ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Poster (2015, September)

False memories induced by the DRM procedure (“Deese, Roediger and McDermott”; Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) or the misinformation procedure (in which a person’s recollection of a witnessed ... [more ▼]

False memories induced by the DRM procedure (“Deese, Roediger and McDermott”; Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) or the misinformation procedure (in which a person’s recollection of a witnessed event is altered after exposure to misinformation about this event; Loftus et al., 1978) are due to errors in source monitoring processes (e.g., Johnson et al., 1993) and one might expect the correlation between these false memories quite positive. However, the few laboratory studies comparing the DRM paradigm and the misinformation paradigm show small (Zhu et al., 2013) or no correlation (Ost et al., 2013) between the false memories elicited by these procedures. However, these studies vary in terms of methodological details. For instance, false memories from the misinformation procedure involved emotional content while those from the DRM procedure only included neutral materials. This study investigated the relationship between false memories induced by two different paradigms (a DRM task and a misinformation procedure) both involving an emotional material. Participants (N = 154) completed an emotional variant of the DRM (neutral, positive and negative lists) and the misinformation (neutral, positive and negative images) procedures and their performances on both tasks were compared. Although both paradigms reliably induced false memories in participants, our analyses revealed only a marginally weak positive correlation (r = .147, p = .051) between misinformation and DRM false memories using emotional variants. These results support the idea that DRM and misinformation false memories are underpinned by (at least in part) different mechanisms and that the previous mixed results were not due to the specific content of the DRM or the misinformation task used. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (3 ULg)
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See detailPsychopathy and emotions: would emotional distancing make more efficient in cognitive tasks?
Grandjean, Sylvie; Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Blavier, Adelaïde ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 28)

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailComparison of individuals’ susceptibility to false memory induced by both DRM and misinformation paradigms involving emotional material
Martial, Charlotte ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Poster (2015, May)

False memories induced by the DRM procedure (“Deese, Roediger and McDermott”; Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) or the misinformation procedure (in which a person’s recollection of a witnessed ... [more ▼]

False memories induced by the DRM procedure (“Deese, Roediger and McDermott”; Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) or the misinformation procedure (in which a person’s recollection of a witnessed event is altered after exposure to misinformation about this event; Loftus et al., 1978) are due to errors in source monitoring processes (e.g., Johnson et al., 1993) and one might expect the correlation between these false memories quite positive. However, the few laboratory studies comparing the DRM paradigm and the misinformation paradigm show small (Zhu et al., 2013) or no correlation (Ost et al., 2013) between the false memories elicited by these procedures but these studies vary in terms of methodological details. For instance, false memories from the misinformation procedure involved emotional content while those from the DRM procedure only included neutral materials. This study investigated the relationship between false memories induced by two different paradigms (a DRM task and a misinformation procedure) both involving an emotional material. Participants (N = 154) completed an emotional variant of the DRM (neutral, positive and negative lists) and the misinformation (neutral, positive and negative images) procedures and their performances on both tasks were compared. Although both paradigms reliably induced false memories in participants, our analyses revealed only a marginally weak positive correlation (r = .147, p = .051) between misinformation and DRM false memories using emotional variants. These results support the idea that DRM and misinformation false memories are underpinned by (at least in part) different mechanisms and that the previous mixed results were not due to the specific content of the DRM or the misinformation task used. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 124 (2 ULg)
See detailLa mémoire manipulée - les faux souvenirs et les faux aveux sont-ils possibles?
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Article for general public (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (1 ULg)
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See detailAre you sure this was your own idea?
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Poster (2014, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (7 ULg)
See detailFonctionnement de la mémoire et faux souvenirs dans le cadre du témoignage
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Scientific conference (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (1 ULg)
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See detailVerbal overshadowing of face memory does occur in children too!
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Vanootighem, Valentine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in Frontiers in Psychology (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (13 ULg)
See detailMémoire et faux souvenirs dans le cadre du témoignage
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Scientific conference (2013, November)

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (2 ULg)
See detailRemembering things that never happened: 20 years of False Memory study with the DRM paradigm
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Scientific conference (2013, October 08)

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (0 ULg)
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See detailA study about the effects of affective valence on a source-monitoring error: cryptomnesia
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Perfect, Timothy J. et al

Poster (2013, August)

Detailed reference viewed: 99 (14 ULg)