References of "Dehon, Hedwige"
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See detailPsychopathy and emotions: would emotional distancing make more efficient in cognitive tasks?
Grandjean, Sylvie; Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Blavier, Adelaïde ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 28)

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See detailComparison of individuals’ susceptibility to false memory induced by both DRM and misinformation paradigms involving emotional material
Martial, Charlotte ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Poster (2015, May)

False memories induced by the DRM procedure (“Deese, Roediger and McDermott”; Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) or the misinformation procedure (in which a person’s recollection of a witnessed ... [more ▼]

False memories induced by the DRM procedure (“Deese, Roediger and McDermott”; Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) or the misinformation procedure (in which a person’s recollection of a witnessed event is altered after exposure to misinformation about this event; Loftus et al., 1978) are due to errors in source monitoring processes (e.g., Johnson et al., 1993) and one might expect the correlation between these false memories quite positive. However, the few laboratory studies comparing the DRM paradigm and the misinformation paradigm show small (Zhu et al., 2013) or no correlation (Ost et al., 2013) between the false memories elicited by these procedures but these studies vary in terms of methodological details. For instance, false memories from the misinformation procedure involved emotional content while those from the DRM procedure only included neutral materials. This study investigated the relationship between false memories induced by two different paradigms (a DRM task and a misinformation procedure) both involving an emotional material. Participants (N = 154) completed an emotional variant of the DRM (neutral, positive and negative lists) and the misinformation (neutral, positive and negative images) procedures and their performances on both tasks were compared. Although both paradigms reliably induced false memories in participants, our analyses revealed only a marginally weak positive correlation (r = .147, p = .051) between misinformation and DRM false memories using emotional variants. These results support the idea that DRM and misinformation false memories are underpinned by (at least in part) different mechanisms and that the previous mixed results were not due to the specific content of the DRM or the misinformation task used. [less ▲]

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See detailAre you sure this was your own idea?
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Poster (2014, July)

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See detailFonctionnement de la mémoire et faux souvenirs dans le cadre du témoignage
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Scientific conference (2014)

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See detailVerbal overshadowing of face memory does occur in children too!
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Vanootighem, Valentine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in Frontiers in Psychology (2013)

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See detailMémoire et faux souvenirs dans le cadre du témoignage
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Scientific conference (2013, November)

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See detailRemembering things that never happened: 20 years of False Memory study with the DRM paradigm
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Scientific conference (2013, October 08)

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See detailA study about the effects of affective valence on a source-monitoring error: cryptomnesia
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Perfect, Timothy J. et al

Poster (2013, August)

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See detailInfluence of emotional content of items on cryptomnesia
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Perfect, Timothy J. et al

Poster (2013, July)

Although the link between emotion and memory has been demonstrated for long, only one study has examined the impact of emotion on inadvertent plagiarism (cryptomnesia) up to now (Gingerich & Dodson, 2012 ... [more ▼]

Although the link between emotion and memory has been demonstrated for long, only one study has examined the impact of emotion on inadvertent plagiarism (cryptomnesia) up to now (Gingerich & Dodson, 2012). The Gingerich and Dodson‘s experiment examined the impact of mood on unintentional plagiarism. The present study examined the effect of emotional content of items on the occurrence of unintentional plagiarism using the Brown and Murphy paradigm (1989). In a first stage, same-sex dyads (96 participants, 48 men, mean age=21.5 years) were asked to generate alternately words corresponding to an emotional category. Three categories were proposed to our participants: positive, neutral and negative. Participants returned after a one week-delay and were instructed (1) to recall the items generated by themselves one week earlier (RO task), (2) to generate four new items for each category (GN task), and (3) to assign a confidence rating. In the RO task, almost 17% of responses were plagiarisms and the percentage almost reached 9% in the GN task. In the RO task, plagiarism was significantly higher for positive than neutral items. In addition, positive and negative items were better recalled than neutral one. These results demonstrate an impact of the emotional content on inadvertent plagiarism. [less ▲]

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See detailDo we plagiarize more often when the content of the to-be-remembered material is emotional?
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Perfect, Timothy J. et al

Poster (2013, June)

This study examined the impact of the emotional content on rates of cryptomnesia using the Brown and Murphy (1989) paradigm. In a first stage, dyads of young (mean age = 21.5 years) participants (n = 96 ... [more ▼]

This study examined the impact of the emotional content on rates of cryptomnesia using the Brown and Murphy (1989) paradigm. In a first stage, dyads of young (mean age = 21.5 years) participants (n = 96, 48 females) were asked to generate alternately words corresponding to an emotional category (i.e.,“positive”, “negative” or “neutral”). One week later, participants were instructed (1) to recall the items that were generated by themselves and not by the other member of the dyad (Recall-Own task), (2) to generate four news items (Generate-New task) for each category and (3) to assign confidence ratings to their responses. About 17% of responses were plagiarisms in the recall-own task and the percentage almost reached 9% in the Generate-New task. No significant effects of valence were found on rates of plagiarism in Generate-New task nor on the confidence ratings assigned to the participants' responses. However, cryptomnesia was significantly higher for positive than neutral items while it did not differ significantly across negative and neutral items. Confidence ratings were lower for plagiarized responses than for correct responses but these ratings were higher for plagiarized items than for intrusions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 73 (7 ULg)
See detailNegative valence affects false working memories too
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Martial, Charlotte ULg

Poster (2013, May 28)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (12 ULg)