References of "Dehon, Hedwige"
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See detailVerbal overshadowing of face memory does occur in children too!
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Vanootighem, Valentine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in Frontiers in Psychology (2013)

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See detailA study about the effects of affective valence on a source-monitoring error: cryptomnesia
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Perfect, Timothy J. et al

Poster (2013, August)

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See detailInfluence of emotional content of items on cryptomnesia
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Perfect, Timothy J. et al

Poster (2013, July)

Although the link between emotion and memory has been demonstrated for long, only one study has examined the impact of emotion on inadvertent plagiarism (cryptomnesia) up to now (Gingerich & Dodson, 2012 ... [more ▼]

Although the link between emotion and memory has been demonstrated for long, only one study has examined the impact of emotion on inadvertent plagiarism (cryptomnesia) up to now (Gingerich & Dodson, 2012). The Gingerich and Dodson‘s experiment examined the impact of mood on unintentional plagiarism. The present study examined the effect of emotional content of items on the occurrence of unintentional plagiarism using the Brown and Murphy paradigm (1989). In a first stage, same-sex dyads (96 participants, 48 men, mean age=21.5 years) were asked to generate alternately words corresponding to an emotional category. Three categories were proposed to our participants: positive, neutral and negative. Participants returned after a one week-delay and were instructed (1) to recall the items generated by themselves one week earlier (RO task), (2) to generate four new items for each category (GN task), and (3) to assign a confidence rating. In the RO task, almost 17% of responses were plagiarisms and the percentage almost reached 9% in the GN task. In the RO task, plagiarism was significantly higher for positive than neutral items. In addition, positive and negative items were better recalled than neutral one. These results demonstrate an impact of the emotional content on inadvertent plagiarism. [less ▲]

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See detailDo we plagiarize more often when the content of the to-be-remembered material is emotional?
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Perfect, Timothy J. et al

Poster (2013, June)

This study examined the impact of the emotional content on rates of cryptomnesia using the Brown and Murphy (1989) paradigm. In a first stage, dyads of young (mean age = 21.5 years) participants (n = 96 ... [more ▼]

This study examined the impact of the emotional content on rates of cryptomnesia using the Brown and Murphy (1989) paradigm. In a first stage, dyads of young (mean age = 21.5 years) participants (n = 96, 48 females) were asked to generate alternately words corresponding to an emotional category (i.e.,“positive”, “negative” or “neutral”). One week later, participants were instructed (1) to recall the items that were generated by themselves and not by the other member of the dyad (Recall-Own task), (2) to generate four news items (Generate-New task) for each category and (3) to assign confidence ratings to their responses. About 17% of responses were plagiarisms in the recall-own task and the percentage almost reached 9% in the Generate-New task. No significant effects of valence were found on rates of plagiarism in Generate-New task nor on the confidence ratings assigned to the participants' responses. However, cryptomnesia was significantly higher for positive than neutral items while it did not differ significantly across negative and neutral items. Confidence ratings were lower for plagiarized responses than for correct responses but these ratings were higher for plagiarized items than for intrusions. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacteristics of Near-Death Experiences Memories as Compared to Real and Imagined Events Memories
Thonnard, Marie ULg; Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(3),

Since the dawn of time, Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) have intrigued and, nowadays, are still not fully explained. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined events, and since memories of imagined ... [more ▼]

Since the dawn of time, Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) have intrigued and, nowadays, are still not fully explained. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined events, and since memories of imagined event have, on average, fewer phenomenological characteristics than real events memories, we here compared phenomenological characteristics of NDEs reports with memories of imagined and real events. We included three groups of coma survivors (8 patients with NDE as defined by the Greyson NDE scale, 6 patients without NDE but with memory of their coma, 7 patients without memories of their coma) and a group of 18 age-matched healthy volunteers. Five types of memories were assessed using Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ – Johnson et al., 1988): target memory (NDE for NDE memory group, coma memory for coma memory group, and first childhood memory for no memory and control groups), old and recent real event memories and old and recent imagined event memories. Since NDEs are known to have high emotional content, participants were requested to choose the most emotionally salient memories for both real and imagined recent and old event memories. Results showed that, in NDE memories group, NDE memories have more characteristics than memories of imagined and real events (p<0.02). NDE memories contain more self-referential and emotional information and have better clarity than memories of coma (all p<0.02). The present study showed that NDE memories contain more characteristics than real event memories and coma memories. Thus, this suggests that they cannot be considered as imagined event memories. On the contrary, their physiological origins could lead them to be really perceived although not lived in the reality. Further work is needed to better understand this phenomenon. [less ▲]

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See detailRecollection illusoire et faux souvenirs d’évènements personnellement vécus
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

in Brédart, Serge; Van der Linden, Martial (Eds.) Identité et Cognition: Apports de la psychologie et de la neuroscience cognitives (2012)

La qualité des souvenirs d’évènements que nous avons personnellement vécus peut varier considérablement d’un souvenir à l’autre. Certains souvenirs peuvent contenir une multitude de caractéristiques ... [more ▼]

La qualité des souvenirs d’évènements que nous avons personnellement vécus peut varier considérablement d’un souvenir à l’autre. Certains souvenirs peuvent contenir une multitude de caractéristiques (perceptives, contextuelles, émotionnelles, cognitives,…) tandis que d’autres s’accompagnent simplement d’un vague sentiment de familiarité. De façon troublante, cependant, de par son mode de fonctionnement, notre mémoire peut nous induire en erreur et nous nous rappelons parfois d’évènements de façon inexacte, déformée ou nous pouvons même avoir le souvenir d’un évènement qui ne s’est jamais produit. Plus étonnant encore, certains de ces « faux souvenirs » s’accompagnent d’un véritable sentiment de « recollection illusoire », au cours duquel nous sommes capables de récupérer une foule de détails liés à l’occurrence supposée d’un évènement qui ne s’est pourtant jamais produit. Le but de ce chapitre est de décrire différentes procédures qui permettent d’induire et d’étudier des faux souvenirs en laboratoire et de fournir un modèle explicatif général des faux souvenirs et du sentiment de « recollection illusoire » qui les accompagne. [less ▲]

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See detailMemories of Near-Death experiences are they memories of imagined events?
Thonnard, Marie ULg; Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg et al

Poster (2012, October 27)

Background: The phenomenon of Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) has always intrigued but is still not fully explained despite numerous theories and studies. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined ... [more ▼]

Background: The phenomenon of Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) has always intrigued but is still not fully explained despite numerous theories and studies. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined events (French, 2001), and since memories of imagined events have, on average, fewer phenomenological characteristics than real event memories (e.g. Johnson et al., 1988), we here compared phenomenological characteristics of NDEs reports with memories of imagined and real events. Methods: We included 3 groups of coma survivors (8 patients with NDE as defined by the Greyson NDE scale – the “NDE memory group”- , 6 patients without NDE but with memory of their coma – the “coma memory group” – and 7 patients without memories of their coma – the “no memory group”) and a group of 18 age-matched healthy volunteers. Five memories were assessed using Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ – Johnson et al., 1988): target memory (NDE for NDE memory group, coma memory for coma memory group, and first childhood memory for no memory and control groups), old and recent real event memories and old and recent imagined event memories. Results: In NDE group, NDE memories showd more characteristics than memories of imagined and real events (p<0.02). These memories contain more self-referential and emotional information and have better clarity than memories of coma (all p<0.02). Conclusion: The present study showed that NDE memories contain more characteristics than real event memories and coma memories. Thus, they cannot be considered as classic imagined event memories. On the contrary, their physiological origins could lead them to be really perceived although not lived in the reality. Further work is needed to better understand this phenomenon [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of verbal descriptions and delay on face identification in children and adults.
Vanootighem, Valentine ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

Poster (2012, May 10)

Verbal descriptions of unfamiliar faces have been found to impair later identification of these faces in adults, a phenomenon known as the “verbal overshadowing effect (VO)” (Schooler & Englster-Schooler ... [more ▼]

Verbal descriptions of unfamiliar faces have been found to impair later identification of these faces in adults, a phenomenon known as the “verbal overshadowing effect (VO)” (Schooler & Englster-Schooler, 1990). In spite of a large body of literature on the suggestibility of children testimony, only one study has examined whether descriptions also impaired children’s identification abilities in a single group of children (8-9 years old) and no evidence of VO was found (Memon & Rose, 2002). However, the method might not have been appropriate to observe this effect as the description and the control tasks were not completed immediately but after a 24h delay that has sometimes been associated to a release of the VO effect (e.g. Schooler & Englster-Schooler, 1990; Finger & Pezdek, 1999). The aim of this experiment was to examine the influence of verbal descriptions and delay on face identification in several groups of children (7-8, 10-11, 13-14 years old) and adults when assigned either to “No delay”, “Post description delay” or “Post encoding delay” condition. The quality and influence of descriptors across the ages were also examined. [less ▲]

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See detailLateralized processing of false memories and pseudoneglect in aging.
Schmitz, Rémy; Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2012)

Aging is associated with higher propensity to false memories and decreased retrieval of previously studied items. When young adults perform on a lateralized version of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM ... [more ▼]

Aging is associated with higher propensity to false memories and decreased retrieval of previously studied items. When young adults perform on a lateralized version of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm, the right cerebral hemisphere (RH) is more sensitive than the left (LH) to false memories, suggesting hemispheric imbalance in the cerebral mechanisms supporting semantic and episodic memory processes. Since cerebral asymmetries tend to be reduced with age, we surmised that behavioral asymmetries in the generation of false memories would be diminished with aging. To probe this hypothesis, a lateralized version of the DRM paradigm was administered to old (OA) and young (YA) healthy adults. During the encoding phase, lists of semantically associated words were memorized. During the retrieval session, targets (previously seen words), lures (never seen strongly semantically related words) and distracters (never seen, unrelated words) were briefly displayed either in the left or right visual fields, thus primarily stimulating the RH or LH, respectively. Participants had to decide whether the word was previously studied (Old/New), but also whether they had a strong episodic recollection (Remember) or a mere feeling of familiarity (Know) about Old words. In line with our predictions, false memories were globally higher in OA than YA, and vivid false recollections (i.e. Remember responses) were higher when lures were presented in the RH in YA, but not in OA. Additionally, we found significant correlations between YA participants’ familiarity scores and leftward attentional bias as previously evidenced using a visuospatial landmark task [Schmitz, R., and Peigneux, P. (2011). Age-related changes in visual pseudoneglect. Brain and Cognition, 76(3), 382-389], an effect not present in OA. This result is in line with the hypothesis of an interplay between attentional resources allocated to visuospatial and memory processes, suggesting a memory pseudoneglect phenomenon that would be altered with aging. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes delay release the verbal overshadowing effect in child and adult eyewitnesses?
Vanootighem, Valentine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

in Perception (2012), 41(supplement), 194

The verbal overshadowing effect (VO) (eg, Schooler and Engstler-Schooler, 1990 Cognitive Psychology 22(1) 36–71) suggests that the fact of generating a verbal description of a previously seen face may ... [more ▼]

The verbal overshadowing effect (VO) (eg, Schooler and Engstler-Schooler, 1990 Cognitive Psychology 22(1) 36–71) suggests that the fact of generating a verbal description of a previously seen face may impair subsequent performance on a lineup identification task in adults. Previous research has examined whether descriptions also impaired children’s identification abilities but no evidence of VO was found (Memon and Rose, 2002 Psychology, Crime and Law 8(3), 229–242). However, the method might not have been appropriate to observe this effect as, for instance, a 24-hour delay between the description and the identification tasks (associated with a release of the VO effect in adults) was used. Hence, in this current experiment, groups of children (7–8, 10–11, 13–14 years old) and adults were presented with a short video and then assigned to a description or a no description condition before the identification task. Participants were also assigned either to a “no delay”, a “24-hour post encoding delay” or a “24-hour post description delay” condition to determine the influence of delay on the VO effect. Results indicated that, compared to the control condition, the description decreased correct identification performance in both children and adults and no release of VO was found with delay. [less ▲]

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See detailIllusory recollection: The compelling subjective remembrance of things that never happened. Insights from the DRM paradigm.
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

in Psychologica Belgica (2012)

Illusory recollection is the subjective detailed feeling of remembering that sometimes accompanies false remembering of events that never happened (e.g., high confidence, “Remember” judgements, or even ... [more ▼]

Illusory recollection is the subjective detailed feeling of remembering that sometimes accompanies false remembering of events that never happened (e.g., high confidence, “Remember” judgements, or even remembrance of precise details supposedly associated with the false event). In this review, typical illusory recollection measures obtained from laboratory studies will be depicted, with a focus on the DRM paradigm (Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995), one of the most largely used procedures to study memory distortion and its associated illusory recollection. The theoretical explanations of illusory recollection will be described and contrasted in light of factors affecting the phenomenon, in order to shown their strengths and limits. Although the focus on the origins of illusory recollection is relatively recent, overall, this review suggests that DRM false memories can be an excellent tool to study this phenomenon under controlled conditions and to gain insights on false memories occurring in everyday life. [less ▲]

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See detailDepicting the Missing: Prospective and Retrospective Person Memory for Age Progressed Photographs
Lampinen, James Michael; Miller, Justin T; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

in Applied Cognitive Psychology (2012), 26(2), 197-173

One approach that has been used to help recover missing children is forensic age progression. In forensic age progression, outdated photographs of missing children are aged to provide an estimate of the ... [more ▼]

One approach that has been used to help recover missing children is forensic age progression. In forensic age progression, outdated photographs of missing children are aged to provide an estimate of the current appearance of the child. We examined the effectiveness of age progressed image in the context of both prospective person memory and retrospective person memory. Memory for outdated pictures and age progressed pictures did not significantly differ. The results failed to demonstrate an advantage for age progressed pictures. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence of a verbal overshadowing effect in children
Vanootighem, Valentine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Poster (2011, August 01)

The report of verbal descriptions of a culprit by adult witnesses may impair their later identification ability, a phenomenon known as the “verbal overshadowing effect (VO)” (Schooler & Englster-Schooler ... [more ▼]

The report of verbal descriptions of a culprit by adult witnesses may impair their later identification ability, a phenomenon known as the “verbal overshadowing effect (VO)” (Schooler & Englster-Schooler, 1990). In spite of a large body of literature on the suggestibility of children testimony, only one study has examined whether descriptions also impaired children’s identification abilities in a single group of children (8-9 years old) and no evidence of VO was found (Memon & Rose, 2002). However, some procedural details were not controlled in this experiment and the absence of a control adult group did not allow determining whether the procedure used was able to induce a VO effect. Hence, 2 experiments were conducted on several groups of children (7-8, 10-11, 13-14 years old) and adults to determine the influence of development on the VO effect. Overall, a VO effect on face identification was found in both experiments. The quality and influence of descriptors across the ages were also examined. [less ▲]

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See detailVieillir, c'est avant tout dans la tête?
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

in La sève (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (13 ULg)