References of "Dehon, Hedwige"
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See detailAre you sure this was your own idea?
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Poster (2014, July)

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See detailFonctionnement de la mémoire et faux souvenirs dans le cadre du témoignage
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Scientific conference (2014)

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See detailVerbal overshadowing of face memory does occur in children too!
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Vanootighem, Valentine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in Frontiers in Psychology (2013)

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See detailMémoire et faux souvenirs dans le cadre du témoignage
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Scientific conference (2013, November)

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See detailRemembering things that never happened: 20 years of False Memory study with the DRM paradigm
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Scientific conference (2013, October 08)

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See detailA study about the effects of affective valence on a source-monitoring error: cryptomnesia
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Perfect, Timothy J. et al

Poster (2013, August)

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See detailInfluence of emotional content of items on cryptomnesia
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Perfect, Timothy J. et al

Poster (2013, July)

Although the link between emotion and memory has been demonstrated for long, only one study has examined the impact of emotion on inadvertent plagiarism (cryptomnesia) up to now (Gingerich & Dodson, 2012 ... [more ▼]

Although the link between emotion and memory has been demonstrated for long, only one study has examined the impact of emotion on inadvertent plagiarism (cryptomnesia) up to now (Gingerich & Dodson, 2012). The Gingerich and Dodson‘s experiment examined the impact of mood on unintentional plagiarism. The present study examined the effect of emotional content of items on the occurrence of unintentional plagiarism using the Brown and Murphy paradigm (1989). In a first stage, same-sex dyads (96 participants, 48 men, mean age=21.5 years) were asked to generate alternately words corresponding to an emotional category. Three categories were proposed to our participants: positive, neutral and negative. Participants returned after a one week-delay and were instructed (1) to recall the items generated by themselves one week earlier (RO task), (2) to generate four new items for each category (GN task), and (3) to assign a confidence rating. In the RO task, almost 17% of responses were plagiarisms and the percentage almost reached 9% in the GN task. In the RO task, plagiarism was significantly higher for positive than neutral items. In addition, positive and negative items were better recalled than neutral one. These results demonstrate an impact of the emotional content on inadvertent plagiarism. [less ▲]

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See detailDo we plagiarize more often when the content of the to-be-remembered material is emotional?
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Perfect, Timothy J. et al

Poster (2013, June)

This study examined the impact of the emotional content on rates of cryptomnesia using the Brown and Murphy (1989) paradigm. In a first stage, dyads of young (mean age = 21.5 years) participants (n = 96 ... [more ▼]

This study examined the impact of the emotional content on rates of cryptomnesia using the Brown and Murphy (1989) paradigm. In a first stage, dyads of young (mean age = 21.5 years) participants (n = 96, 48 females) were asked to generate alternately words corresponding to an emotional category (i.e.,“positive”, “negative” or “neutral”). One week later, participants were instructed (1) to recall the items that were generated by themselves and not by the other member of the dyad (Recall-Own task), (2) to generate four news items (Generate-New task) for each category and (3) to assign confidence ratings to their responses. About 17% of responses were plagiarisms in the recall-own task and the percentage almost reached 9% in the Generate-New task. No significant effects of valence were found on rates of plagiarism in Generate-New task nor on the confidence ratings assigned to the participants' responses. However, cryptomnesia was significantly higher for positive than neutral items while it did not differ significantly across negative and neutral items. Confidence ratings were lower for plagiarized responses than for correct responses but these ratings were higher for plagiarized items than for intrusions. [less ▲]

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See detailNegative valence affects false working memories too
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Martial, Charlotte ULg

Poster (2013, May 28)

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See detailCharacteristics of Near-Death Experiences Memories as Compared to Real and Imagined Events Memories
Thonnard, Marie ULg; Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(3),

Since the dawn of time, Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) have intrigued and, nowadays, are still not fully explained. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined events, and since memories of imagined ... [more ▼]

Since the dawn of time, Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) have intrigued and, nowadays, are still not fully explained. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined events, and since memories of imagined event have, on average, fewer phenomenological characteristics than real events memories, we here compared phenomenological characteristics of NDEs reports with memories of imagined and real events. We included three groups of coma survivors (8 patients with NDE as defined by the Greyson NDE scale, 6 patients without NDE but with memory of their coma, 7 patients without memories of their coma) and a group of 18 age-matched healthy volunteers. Five types of memories were assessed using Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ – Johnson et al., 1988): target memory (NDE for NDE memory group, coma memory for coma memory group, and first childhood memory for no memory and control groups), old and recent real event memories and old and recent imagined event memories. Since NDEs are known to have high emotional content, participants were requested to choose the most emotionally salient memories for both real and imagined recent and old event memories. Results showed that, in NDE memories group, NDE memories have more characteristics than memories of imagined and real events (p<0.02). NDE memories contain more self-referential and emotional information and have better clarity than memories of coma (all p<0.02). The present study showed that NDE memories contain more characteristics than real event memories and coma memories. Thus, this suggests that they cannot be considered as imagined event memories. On the contrary, their physiological origins could lead them to be really perceived although not lived in the reality. Further work is needed to better understand this phenomenon. [less ▲]

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See detailWho do you really think you are? How (false) memories may affect your identity and behavior
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)
See detailFonctionnement de la mémoire et faux souvenirs dans le cadre du témoignage
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Scientific conference (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)