References of "Degré, Aurore"
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See detailCrop residue management in arable cropping systems under a temperate climate. Part 2: Soil physical properties and crop production. A review
Hiel, Marie-Pierre ULg; Chelin, Marie ULg; Parvin, Nargish ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (in press)

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See detailContraintes Socio-économiques de Répartition des Terres et Impacts sur la Conservation des Sols dans les Hauts Plateaux de l’Ouest du Cameroun
Djoukeng, Henri Grisseur ULg; Dogot, Thomas ULg; Tankou, Christopher Mubeteneh et al

in Tropicultura (in press)

This article combines the social survey data on access to land and those of the adoption of tied ridging as soil conservation technique to help better understand the management of erosion and runoff by ... [more ▼]

This article combines the social survey data on access to land and those of the adoption of tied ridging as soil conservation technique to help better understand the management of erosion and runoff by farmers in the Western Highlands of Cameroon, specifically in the hills of Fongo-Tongo villages’ group. The study focused on 230 plots owned by 157 respondents on 158 people inventoried. Five main modes of access to land were listed as: inheritance, purchase, temporary transfers, donations and rental. The owners and operators of the hills of gentle slopes (between11% and 17%) and steepest slopes (between 22% and 29%) were inventoried. Two main social ranks were identified: the dignitaries (Chiefs, Notables, Elites and heirs) and other (non-heirs son and women). The study showed that the agronomic abilities of plots as recognized by farmers are a key factor in the implementation of soil conservation techniques. The peasant approach of soil fertility has been scientifically proven by the physicochemical analysis of soil samples taken under plant species used locally as indicator of soil fertility (Pennisetum spp on fertile soils and Imperata cylindrica and Melinis minutiflora on poor soils). The study showed that access to land, adoption of tied ridging and slope exploitation were significantly influenced by the socio-economic status of farmers (p <0.05). [less ▲]

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See detailÉVOLUTION DE LA TENEUR EN EAU LE LONG D’UNE TOPOSEQUENCE FORESTIERE ARGILO-LIMONEUSE
Deraedt, Deborah ULg; Colinet, Gilles ULg; Degré, Aurore ULg

in Milieux Poreux et Transferts Hydriques (in press)

For the hydrological modeling of forested watersheds, the understanding of the forest hydrodynamic is essential. This study focusses on the hydrology of a Belgian forested plot with high stoniness and ... [more ▼]

For the hydrological modeling of forested watersheds, the understanding of the forest hydrodynamic is essential. This study focusses on the hydrology of a Belgian forested plot with high stoniness and steep slope. The soil water content is monitored at several positions on the toposequence and at different depth. During rain events, peak in soil water content are observed in different depth depending on the position along the toposequence. [less ▲]

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See detailGiser: Gestion intégrée sol-érosion-ruissellement - Rapport d'activités 2015-2016
Bielders, Charles; Degré, Aurore ULg; Demarcin, Pierre ULg et al

Report (2016)

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See detailSoil-specific calibration of capacitance sensors considering clay content and bulk density
Parvin, Nargish ULg; Degré, Aurore ULg

in Australian Journal of Soil Research (2016)

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See detailImproving Farmers’ Profitability, Soil and Water Conservation through an Adapted Tillage Technique: Experiences from the Cultivation of Potatoes in Bamiléké’s Hills, Cameroon
Djoukeng, Henri Grisseur ULg; Brostaux, Yves ULg; Tankou, Christopher Mubeteneh et al

in International Journal of Agriculture Innovations and Research (2016), 4(4), 708-716

On farms situated on slopes, such as those in the Western Highlands of Cameroon, the implementation of soil and water conservation techniques remains a major concern. The land preparation methods commonly ... [more ▼]

On farms situated on slopes, such as those in the Western Highlands of Cameroon, the implementation of soil and water conservation techniques remains a major concern. The land preparation methods commonly practiced in the Western Highlands agro-ecological zone of Cameroon are ridging along the steepest slopes (RASS) and the flatbed (FB). Field observations showed FB and RASS promote erosion by runoff, thereby compromising some agriculture functions (environmental function, production function and even social function). In order to ensure soil stability and maintain good water quality for rivers, a new land preparation method, tied ridging (TR), was tested. Erosion by runoff tests were conducted with four blocks of three plots on each of the most commonly exploited slopes, namely 11% and 29% gradient. With the main crop in the area (potato, Solanum tuberosum L.), the performance of RASS, FB, and TR were compared during crop years 2013 and 2014. The water runoff and sediments were collected per plot and per block after every rainfall. The results showed a significant difference between the FB or RASS and TR in terms of soil loss (Fmin(2, 2) = 322.7, p = 0.003), yields (F(2, 2) = 287.7, p = 0.003), and runoff water (Fmin(2, 12) = 2.4x106, p < 0.001). The TR technique generated a 7% increase in seedlings density, a 41% increase in the workforce, and an 81% and 100% increase in yields compared to FB in 11% and 29% slopes, respectively. The TR increased farmer’s profitability by 686 US$.ha-1 and 1420 US$.ha-1 over RASS in 11% and 29% slopes, respectively. The TR showed undeniable advantages: for the producer, the stress of additional work was offset by the gain in yields while creating additional job opportunities and improving the conservation of soil and water. Although the technique has several advantages, the provision of financial means for its implementation could be a negative point. Twelve farmers were involved in the experiment. The test results convinced the participants and other curious farmers who adopted the technology during the second experiment. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of soil structural changes through macroscopic and microscopic measurement
Parvin, Nargish ULg; Degré, Aurore ULg; Chelin, Marie ULg et al

Poster (2015, April 16)

The heterogeneity of soil structure and pore size distribution are highly influenced by external factors like tillage systems and other agricultural management practices. However, changes in soil ... [more ▼]

The heterogeneity of soil structure and pore size distribution are highly influenced by external factors like tillage systems and other agricultural management practices. However, changes in soil hydrodynamic behavior are not fully understood and are still under research. Also, researchers have explained the impact of tillage practices on soil hydraulic properties related to pore size distribution, connectivity and orientation are involved but the characterization of these modifications and consequences remains a challenge. Furthermore, the relation between macroscopic measurements and microscopic investigation of the soil structure remains scarce. Recently, X-ray tomography (X- μCT) has been used in order to characterize changes in soil pore size distribution in various contexts and the method is able to link microtomography information to hydrodynamic measurement. In our study, X-μCT has been used in order to characterize changes in soil pore system. Since, tomography does not count most of the micropores, Richards’ pressure plate and evaporation method was also combined to get complete range of pore size distribution. We found good match between evaporation data with X-μCT at the macropore scale and evaporation data with pressure plate method at micropore scale. X-μCT data refines retention and hydraulic curves near saturation where Richards’ data alone can lead to numerous sets of fitted parameters. On the otherhand, evaporation data (Hyprop apparatus ©) provide comparable datasets with X-μCT. Combining micro and macroscopic measurements allows us to validate X-μCT information, which is otherwise not so obvious. [less ▲]

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See detailSoil porosity in agricultural context: A review of measurement techniques at various scales
Garré, Sarah ULg; Chelin, Marie ULg; Luong, Jeanne ULg et al

Poster (2015, April 13)

Soil compaction was identified by European Commission as one of the eight main threats for agricultural soils. In order to address this issue, measurements of soil porosity are critical. However, there ... [more ▼]

Soil compaction was identified by European Commission as one of the eight main threats for agricultural soils. In order to address this issue, measurements of soil porosity are critical. However, there are as many techniques to measure as there are definitions of porosity. A single method is not sufficient to obtain a complete image of the soil porosity at various scales and encompassing different levels of complexity. Each existing method is characterized by a unique combination of a specific level of complexity, resolution and scale of measurement. In this review, we started by defining the basic terms linked to soil porosity in an agricultural context. Then we give an overview of relevant measurement techniques, from classical methods to recent advances. We present their advantages and disadvantages, the scales of measurement, the resolution, the expected accuracy and the susceptibility to errors. This work aims at guiding the choice for the best (combination of) technique(s) to answer questions related to agricultural soil porosity, categorizing techniques according to the parameters they focus on: from total porosity over pore size distribution, structure and connectivity up to the quantification of spatio-temporal dynamics. [less ▲]

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See detailGISER- Gestion intégrée Sol Erosion Ruissellement - rapport d'activités année 4
Demarcin, Pierre ULg; Dewez, Arnaud; Maugnard, Alexandre et al

Report (2015)

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See detailDétection de l'érosion dans un bassin versant agricole par comparaison d'images multidates acquises par drone
Lisein, Jonathan ULg; Pineux, Nathalie ULg; Pierrot-Deseilligny, marc et al

Scientific conference (2015, March 26)

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See detailSiltation and Pollution of Rivers in the Western Highlands of Cameroon: a Consequence of Farmland Erosion and Runoff
Djoukeng, Henri Grisseur ULg; Tankou, Christopher Mubeteneh; Degré, Aurore ULg

in International Journal of Agricultural Research and Reviews (2015), 3(3), 206-212

In the Western Highlands agro-ecological zone of Cameroon, rivers are constantly silted and polluted with eroded sediment and waste from cultivated land. This study characterizes and quantifies the amount ... [more ▼]

In the Western Highlands agro-ecological zone of Cameroon, rivers are constantly silted and polluted with eroded sediment and waste from cultivated land. This study characterizes and quantifies the amount of material coming from plots cultivated in the Méloh Watershed. In a natural rocky-bottomed well measuring 0.90 m deep, 3 m long, and 2.5 m wide, for a period of three years we performed the collection, differentiation, and measurement of trapped sediment in the cultivated part of river that runs through the watershed. Both cultivated sides of the watershed had fairly regular slopes of 14% on one side and 17% on the other side. The material retrieved consisted of soil, plant residues, chemical packages, and plastic casing used for irrigation. During the years 2012 and 2013, farmers practiced both flatbed cultivation and ridging along the steepest slopes. These two methods of land preparation are inefficient in terms of water conservation, as evidenced by the collection of 10.429 t.ha-1 average total sediment per year during this period. Tied ridging cultivation method was experimented during the 2013 crop year and adopted on 75% of plots in 2014. We subsequently collected 3.586 t.ha-1 total sediment, a decrease of 65.61% compared to the average of previous years. The tied ridging cultivation method significantly reduced siltation of the Méloh River (p<0.05). This study showed that traditional agricultural practices are a principal cause of siltation and pollution of the Méloh River. By extrapolation, we can state that the problem must occur in almost all rivers in the study area with similar topography and agricultural practices [less ▲]

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See detailGiser: formation à destination des communes
Dewez, Arnaud; Bielders, Charles; Degré, Aurore ULg et al

Learning material (2015)

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See detailComparison of soil water potential sensors
Degré, Aurore ULg; Cadwell, Todd; van der Ploeg, Martine

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015)

Temporal and spatial monitoring of soil water potential and soil water content are necessary for quantifying water flow in the domains of hydrology, soil science and crop production as knowledge of the ... [more ▼]

Temporal and spatial monitoring of soil water potential and soil water content are necessary for quantifying water flow in the domains of hydrology, soil science and crop production as knowledge of the soil water retention curve is important for solving Richards’ equation. Numerous measurement techniques exist nowadays that use various physical properties of the soil-water complex to record changes in soil water content or soil water potential. Laboratory techniques are very useful to determine static properties of the soil water retention curve, and have been used to show the impacts of hysteresis. Yet, other spatiotemporal dynamics resulting from for example growing root systems, biological activity, periodic tillage and their impact on the soil structure cannot satisfactory be quantified in static setups in the laboratory. ). To be able to quantify the influence of soil heterogeneity, and spatiotemporal dynamics on the soil water retention curve, an in situ approach combining soil moisture and soil water potential measurements could provide useful data. Such an in situ approach would require sensors that can measure a representative part of the soil water retention curve. The volumetric soil water content is often measured using time domain reflectometry, and has gained widespread acceptance as a standard electronic means of volumetric water content measurement. To measure the soil water potential, water filled tensiometers are used in most studies. Unfortunately, their range remains limited due to cavitation. Recently, several new sensors for use under in situ conditions have been proposed to cover a wider range of pressure head: Polymer tensiometers, MPS (Decagon) and pF-meter (ecoTech). In this study, we present the principles behind each measurement technique. Then we present the results of a fully controlled experiment where we compared two MPS sensors, two pF-meter sensors and two POT sensors in the same repacked soil. It allows us to discuss advantages and disadvantages of each method. A CS616 volumetric water content probe was installed to compare in situ measured retention curves with laboratory measured retention curves for each method. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of stone content on soil moisture measurement with capacitive sensors 10HS (Decagon)
Deraedt, Deborah ULg; Bernard, Julien ULg; Biettlot, Louise ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015), 17

Lot of soil survey focused on agricultural soils. For practical reasons, those soils have a low stone content. So, most of the soil water content sensors are placed on low stone content soils and the ... [more ▼]

Lot of soil survey focused on agricultural soils. For practical reasons, those soils have a low stone content. So, most of the soil water content sensors are placed on low stone content soils and the calibration equations are developed for them. Yet some researches take an interest in forest soils that are often much different from the previous ones. The differences lie in their stone content and their slope. Lots of studies have proved the importance of making soil specific calibration of the soil water content sensor. As our lab use regularly the 10HS sensors (Decagon Devices, United States) in forested soil, we decided to evaluate the importance of the stone content in the soil moisture measurement. The soil used for this experimentation comes from Gembloux (50◦33’54.9”N, 4◦42’11.3”E). It is silt that has been sieved at 2 mm to remove the gravel. The stones used to form the samples come from an experimental site located in the Belgian Ardennes (50◦1’52.6”N, 4◦53’22.5”E). They are mainly composed of schist with some quartz and sandstone elements. Initially, only five samples were constructed with three replications each. The size and the proportion of stones were the variables. Stones were classified in two groups, the first contains gravels whose size is less than 1,5 cm and a the second contains gravels whose size is comprised between 2 and 3 cm. The proportions of stone selected for the experiment are 0, 20 and 40%. In order to generate validation data, two more samples were constructed with intermediate proportion of stone content (30%). The samples were built in PVC container which dimensions are slightly bigger than the sensor volume of influence (1.1-1.3l). The soil samples were saturated and then dried on a thermal chamber set at about 32◦C. During at least 14 days, the samples soil water content was determined by the sensor measurement with the Procheck read-out system (Decagon Devices, United State) and by weighting the samples thrice a day. The evolution of the soil sample height was monitored as well. As first result, the stone content is a parameter that seems to influence soil water content. The stone size is no important. Because soil moisture deserves to be measured accurately in every soil and to confirm the first results the experiment is going on with more samples, different stone proportions, other sensor positioning and a natural air drying. [less ▲]

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See detailTransposability of pedotransfer functions for estimating water retention of Algerian soils
Touil, Sami; Degré, Aurore ULg; Chabaca, Mohamed Nacer

in Desalination and Water Treatment (2015)

Testing the efficiency of a pedotransfer function (PTF) outside of its development data-set is one of the best ways for assessing its robustness. An important question which remains unanswered is how ... [more ▼]

Testing the efficiency of a pedotransfer function (PTF) outside of its development data-set is one of the best ways for assessing its robustness. An important question which remains unanswered is how transposable are PTFs to other agropedoclimatic contexts? Models developed and validated in a particular pedoclimatic context have been relatively little tested in other contexts. Particularly, no studies have been conducted until now to evaluate the PTFs for Algerian soils. In this study, eight (8) PTFs most frequently cited were considered. We used them to evaluate soil water retention at field capacity (FC) and wilting point (WP) on a set of 134 samples collected in the low Cheliff. The calculated Akaike information criterion and root mean square errors values showed that the Rawls, and Ghorbani Dashtaki et Homaee type 1 models were the best in estimation of soil water retention at FC (–709.795, 0.070 cm3 cm−3) and WP (–733.480, 0.064 cm3 cm−3). The poorer performances were presented by the PTFs developed on soils from Europe or United States where the organic matter values were much higher than the Algerian soils. However, the transposability of the PTFs formed from data spread from a wider area, produce more accurate predictions than those built from local data. [less ▲]

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