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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission - XIX. CoRoT-23b: a dense hot Jupiter on an eccentric orbit
Rouan, D.; Parviainen, H.; Moutou, C. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 537

We report the detection of CoRoT-23b, a hot Jupiter transiting in front of its host star with a period of 3.6314 \pm 0.0001 days. This planet was discovered thanks to photometric data secured with the ... [more ▼]

We report the detection of CoRoT-23b, a hot Jupiter transiting in front of its host star with a period of 3.6314 \pm 0.0001 days. This planet was discovered thanks to photometric data secured with the CoRoT satellite, combined with spectroscopic radial velocity (RV) measurements. A photometric search for possible background eclipsing binaries conducted at CFHT and OGS concluded with a very low risk of false positives. The usual techniques of combining RV and transit data simultaneously were used to derive stellar and planetary parameters. The planet has a mass of Mp = 2.8 \pm 0.3 MJup, a radius of Rpl = 1.05 \pm 0.13 RJup, a density of \approx 3 g cm-3. RV data also clearly reveal a non zero eccentricity of e = 0.16 \pm 0.02. The planet orbits a mature G0 main sequence star of V =15.5 mag, with a mass M\star = 1.14 \pm 0.08 M\odot, a radius R\star = 1. 61 \pm 0.18 R\odot and quasi-solar abundances. The age of the system is evaluated to be 7 Gyr, not far from the transition to subgiant, in agreement with the rather large stellar radius. The two features of a significant eccentricity of the orbit and of a fairly high density are fairly uncommon for a hot Jupiter. The high density is, however, consistent with a model of contraction of a planet at this mass, given the age of the system. On the other hand, at such an age, circularization is expected to be completed. In fact, we show that for this planetary mass and orbital distance, any initial eccentricity should not totally vanish after 7 Gyr, as long as the tidal quality factor Qp is more than a few 105, a value that is the lower bound of the usually expected range. Even if Corot-23b features a density and an eccentricity that are atypical of a hot Jupiter, it is thus not an enigmatic object. [less ▲]

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See detailCoRoT LRa02_E2_0121: Neptune-size planet candidate turns into a hierarchical triple system with a giant primary
Tal-Or, L.; Santerne, A.; Mazeh, T. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 534

This paper presents the case of CoRoT LRa02_E2_0121, which was initially classified as a Neptune-size transiting-planet candidate on a relatively wide orbit of 36.3 days. Follow-up observations were ... [more ▼]

This paper presents the case of CoRoT LRa02_E2_0121, which was initially classified as a Neptune-size transiting-planet candidate on a relatively wide orbit of 36.3 days. Follow-up observations were performed with UVES, Sandiford, SOPHIE, and HARPS. These observations revealed a faint companion in the spectra. To find the true nature of the system we derived the radial velocities of the faint companion using TODMOR - a two-dimensional correlation technique, applied to the SOPHIE spectra. Modeling the lightcurve with EBAS we discovered a secondary eclipse with a depth of ~0.07%, indicating a diluted eclipsing binary. Combined MCMC modeling of the lightcurve and the radial velocities suggested that CoRoT LRa02_E2_0121 is a hierarchical triple system with an evolved G-type primary and an A-type:F-type grazing eclipsing binary. Such triple systems are difficult to discover. Based on observations made with the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France, the 3.6-m telescope at La Silla Observatory (ESO), Chile (program 184.C-0639), the VLT at Paranal Observatory (ESO), Chile (program 083.C-0690), and the 2.1-m Otto Struve telescope at McDonald Observatory, Texas, USA. [less ▲]

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See detailThe HARPS search for southern extra-solar planets XXXII. Only 4 planets in the Gl~581 system
Forveille, T.; Bonfils, X.; Delfosse, X. et al

E-print/Working paper (2011)

The Gl 581 planetary system has generated wide interest, because its 4 planets include both the lowest mass planet known around a main sequence star other than the Sun and the first super-Earth planet in ... [more ▼]

The Gl 581 planetary system has generated wide interest, because its 4 planets include both the lowest mass planet known around a main sequence star other than the Sun and the first super-Earth planet in the habitable zone of its star. A recent paper announced the possible discovery of two additional super-Earth planets in that system, one of which would be in the middle of the habitable zone of Gl 581. The statistical significance of those two discoveries has, however, been questioned. We have obtained 121 new radial velocity measurements of Gl 581 with the HARPS spectrograph on the ESO 3.6 m telescope, and analyse those together with our previous 119 measurements of that star to examine these potential additional planets. We find that neither is likely to exist with their proposed parameters. We also obtained photometric observations with the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope during a potential transit of the inner planet, Gl 581e, which had a 5% geometric transit probability. Those observations exclude transits for planet densities under 4 times the Earth density within -0.2 sigma to +2.7 sigma of the predicted transit center. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XI. CoRoT-8b: a hot and dense sub-Saturn around a K1 dwarf
Bordé, P.; Bouchy, F.; Deleuil, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 520

<BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-8b, a dense small Saturn-class exoplanet that orbits a K1 dwarf in 6.2 days, and we derive its orbital parameters, mass, and radius. <BR /> Methods: We ... [more ▼]

<BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-8b, a dense small Saturn-class exoplanet that orbits a K1 dwarf in 6.2 days, and we derive its orbital parameters, mass, and radius. <BR /> Methods: We analyzed two complementary data sets: the photometric transit curve of CoRoT-8b as measured by CoRoT and the radial velocity curve of CoRoT-8 as measured by the HARPS spectrometer. <BR /> Results: We find that CoRoT-8b is on a circular orbit with a semi-major axis of 0.063 ± 0.001 AU. It has a radius of 0.57 ± 0.02 R[SUB]J[/SUB], a mass of 0.22 ± 0.03 M[SUB]J[/SUB], and therefore a mean density of 1.6 ± 0.1 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. <BR /> Conclusions: With 67% of the size of Saturn and 72% of its mass, CoRoT-8b has a density comparable to that of Neptune (1.76 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]). We estimate its content in heavy elements to be 47-63 {M}_⊕, and the mass of its hydrogen-helium envelope to be 7-23 {M}_⊕. At 0.063 AU, the thermal loss of hydrogen of CoRoT-8b should be no more than 0.1% over an assumed integrated lifetime of 3 Ga. Observations made with SOPHIE spectrograph at Observatoire de Haute Provence, France (PNP.07B.MOUT), and the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (081.C-0388 and 083.C-0186). The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, has been developed and is operated by the CNES with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brasil, ESA, Germany, and Spain.Both data sets are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/520/A66">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/520/A66</A> [less ▲]

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See detailNoise properties of the CoRoT data. A planet-finding perspective
Aigrain, S.; Pont, F.; Fressin, F. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

In this short paper, we study the photometric precision of stellar light curves obtained by the CoRoT satellite in its planet-finding channel, with a particular emphasis on the time scales characteristic ... [more ▼]

In this short paper, we study the photometric precision of stellar light curves obtained by the CoRoT satellite in its planet-finding channel, with a particular emphasis on the time scales characteristic of planetary transits. Together with other articles in the same issue of this journal, it forms an attempt to provide the building blocks for a statistical interpretation of the CoRoT planet and eclipsing binary catch to date. After pre-processing the light curves so as to minimise long-term variations and outliers, we measure the scatter of the light curves in the first three CoRoT runs lasting more than 1 month, using an iterative non-linear filter to isolate signal on the time scales of interest. The behaviour of the noise on 2 h time scales is described well by a power-law with index 0.25 in R-magnitude, ranging from 0.1 mmag at R=11.5 to 1 mmag at R=16, which is close to the pre-launch specification, though still a factor 2-3 above the photon noise due to residual jitter noise and hot pixel events. There is evidence of slight degradation in the performance over time. We find clear evidence of enhanced variability on hour time scales (at the level of 0.5 mmag) in stars identified as likely giants from their R magnitude and B-V colour, which represent approximately 60 and 20% of the observed population in the directions of Aquila and Monoceros, respectively. On the other hand, median correlated noise levels over 2 h for dwarf stars are extremely low, reaching 0.05 mmag at the bright end. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, has been developed and is operated by the CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. CoRoT data become publicly available one year after release to the Co-Is of the mission from the CoRoT archive: http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr/. [less ▲]

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See detailRemoving systematics from the CoRoT light curves. I. Magnitude-dependent zero point
Mazeh, T.; Guterman, P.; Aigrain, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

This paper presents an analysis that searched for systematic effects within the CoRoT exoplanet field light curves. The analysis identified a systematic effect that modified the zero point of most CoRoT ... [more ▼]

This paper presents an analysis that searched for systematic effects within the CoRoT exoplanet field light curves. The analysis identified a systematic effect that modified the zero point of most CoRoT exposures as a function of stellar magnitude. We could find this effect only after preparing a set of learning light curves that were relatively free of stellar and instrumental noise. Correcting for this effect, rejecting outliers that appear in almost every exposure, and applying SysRem, reduced the stellar RMS by about 20%, without attenuating transit signals. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. CoRoT data become publicly available one year after release to the Co-Is of the mission from the CoRoT archive: http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr/. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. IV. CoRoT-Exo-4b: a transiting planet in a 9.2 day synchronous orbit
Aigrain, S.; Collier Cameron, A.; Ollivier, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2008), 488

CoRoT, the first space-based transit search, provides ultra-high-precision light curves with continuous time-sampling over periods of up to 5 months. This allows the detection of transiting planets with ... [more ▼]

CoRoT, the first space-based transit search, provides ultra-high-precision light curves with continuous time-sampling over periods of up to 5 months. This allows the detection of transiting planets with relatively long periods, and the simultaneous study of the host star's photometric variability. In this Letter, we report the discovery of the transiting giant planet CoRoT-Exo-4b and use the CoRoT light curve to perform a detailed analysis of the transit and determine the stellar rotation period. The CoRoT light curve was pre-processed to remove outliers and correct for orbital residuals and artefacts due to hot pixels on the detector. After removing stellar variability about each transit, the transit light curve was analysed to determine the transit parameters. A discrete autocorrelation function method was used to derive the rotation period of the star from the out-of-transit light curve. We determine the periods of the planetary orbit and star's rotation of 9.20205 ± 0.00037 and 8.87 ± 1.12 days respectively, which is consistent with this being a synchronised system. We also derive the inclination, i = 90.00_-0.085[SUP]+0.000[/SUP] in degrees, the ratio of the orbital distance to the stellar radius, a/R[SUB]s[/SUB] = 17.36[SUB]-0.25[/SUB][SUP]+0.05[/SUP], and the planet-to-star radius ratio R_p/R_s=0.1047[SUB]-0.0022[/SUB][SUP]+0.0041[/SUP]. We discuss briefly the coincidence between the orbital period of the planet and the stellar rotation period and its possible implications for the system's migration and star-planet interaction history. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. The first CoRoT data will be available to the public in February 2009 from the CoRoT archive: http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr/ Figures 1, 4 and 5 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org [less ▲]

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See detailThe life of stars and their planets
Catala, C.; Aerts, C.; Aigrain, S. et al

in Favata, F.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Giménez, A. (Eds.) et al 39TH ESLAB Symposium on Trends in Space Science and Cosmic Vision 2020 (2005, December 01)

We lack a reliable scenario for the formation and evolution of stars and their planetary systems, involving key factors such as magnetic fields and turbulence. We present the case for a mission concept ... [more ▼]

We lack a reliable scenario for the formation and evolution of stars and their planetary systems, involving key factors such as magnetic fields and turbulence. We present the case for a mission concept that will clarify these problems and give us a global view of the evolution of combined star and planetary systems. This will be achieved by simultaneously addressing the search for planetary transits in front of a large number of stars, including many nearby stars, the study of their internal structure and evolution via asteroseismology, and that of their magnetic activity, via UV monitoring. [less ▲]

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