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See detailMEASUREMENT OF CATTLE METHANE EMISSIONS USING THE EDDY-COVARIANCE TECHNIQUE
Dumortier, Pierre ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Debacq, Alain ULg et al

Poster (2014)

Methane emissions account for 8% of the EU-15 GHG emissions and livestock generates approximately half of these emissions [1]. Recent technological advances in spectroscopy now permit methane flux ... [more ▼]

Methane emissions account for 8% of the EU-15 GHG emissions and livestock generates approximately half of these emissions [1]. Recent technological advances in spectroscopy now permit methane flux measurement using eddy covariance. Methane fluxes exchanged by a pasture were measured continuously since June 2012 at the Dorinne Terrestrial Observatory in Belgium. During grazing periods, fluxes are dominated by enteric fermentation. Methane emissions were found strongly related to cattle stocking rate. When fluxes are integrated over large periods and assuming a random position of cows on the pasture, emission per LSU (Livestock Unit) was found to be 53±3 kg CH4 year-1 LSU-1. Recently, cattle position on the grassland was monitored continuously using GPS devices and combined with a footprint analysis [2] to derive more precisely the CH4 emission per LSU. A first experiment with a stocking rate close to 0.7 LSU ha-1 validated the approach and ended in a mean emission per head of 51±10 kg CH4 year-1 head-1. This approach also allows estimating emissions per head at the hourly scale and therefore opens the possibility of studying the circadian emission cycle and to link emissions to feeding behavior of the animal and feed quality. [less ▲]

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See detailYearly Follow-up of Methane Turbulent Exchange Over an Intensively Grazed Pasture in Belgium
Dumortier, Pierre ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Beckers, Yves ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2014), 79(1), 91-96

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See detailCattle methane fluxes measurement over an intensively grazed grassland using eddy covariance
Dumortier, Pierre ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Beckers, Yves ULg et al

Poster (2013, September)

Methane emissions account for 8% of the EU-15 GHG emissions and livestock generates approximately half of these emissions (European Commission, 2009). Recent technological advances in spectroscopy now ... [more ▼]

Methane emissions account for 8% of the EU-15 GHG emissions and livestock generates approximately half of these emissions (European Commission, 2009). Recent technological advances in spectroscopy now permit methane flux measurement using eddy covariance. This method has numerous strengths. It can measure fluxes in situ, continuously and across broad areas. This provides information about meadow and cattle emission behaviour throughout the year and across a broad range of climatic conditions. We will present here a one year monitoring of methane exchange between an intensively grazed meadow and the atmosphere obtained using the eddy-covariance method. Methane fluxes exchanged by a grazed meadow were measured continuously since June 2012 at the Dorinne Terrestrial Observatory (50˚ 18’ 44” N; 4˚ 58’ 07” E; 248 m asl.) in Belgium. The site is an intensively pastured meadow of 4.2 ha managed according to the regional common practices where up to 30 Belgian Blue cows are grazing simultaneously. Flux measurements were made with the eddy covariance technique, using a fast CH4 analyzer (Picarro G2311-f) and a sonic anemometer (Campbell Csat3). Carbon dioxide fluxes and various micro-meteorological and soil variables, biomass growth and stocking rate evolution were also measured at the site. Turbulent fluxes were calculated according to standard eddy covariance computation schemes and were filtered for non-stationarity and for low friction velocity (u*) events. During grazing periods, fluxes are dominated by the enteric fermentation source and average 111 nmol m-2 s-1. They are highly variable, probably due to cow movements in and out the measurement footprint and cow digestion rhythm. Despite this spread, a daily emission rhythm is observed with higher emissions during the afternoon. When fluxes are integrated over large periods, methane emissions were found strongly related to cattle stocking rate with a slope of 7.34±0.78 mol CH4 day-1 LSU-1. Further developments are ongoing in order to improve cattle geo-localization through infra-red cameras and individual home-made GPS devices. The two systems will be compared in terms of cost, efficiency and ease of use. During cow-free periods, the methane flux averages 10.5 nmol m-2 s-1 and is highly variable with some production peaks above 100 nmol m-2 s-1. No relation was found between methane fluxes and soil temperature while a weak negative relation was found between methane fluxes and soil humidity. No soil methane absorption has been observed. European Commission. Fifth National Communication from the European Community Under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Technical Report - 2009 – 038 (2009). [less ▲]

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See detailShort-term temperature impact on soil heterotrophic respiration in limed agricultural soil samples
Buysse, Pauline ULg; Goffin, Stéphanie ULg; Carnol, Monique ULg et al

in Biogeochemistry (2013), 112(1-3), 441-455

This study sought to investigate the hourly and daily timescale responses of soil CO2 fluxes to temperature in a limed agricultural soil. Observations from different incubation experiments were compared ... [more ▼]

This study sought to investigate the hourly and daily timescale responses of soil CO2 fluxes to temperature in a limed agricultural soil. Observations from different incubation experiments were compared with the results of a model combining biotic (heterotrophic respiration) and abiotic (carbonate weathering) components. Several samples were pre-incubated for 8-9 days at three temperatures (5, 15 and 25°C) and then submitted to short-term temperature cycles (where the temperature was increased from 5 to 35°C in 10°C stages, with each stage being 3 h long). During the temperature cycles (hourly timescale), the soil CO2 fluxes increased significantly with temperature under all pre-incubation temperature treatments. A hysteresis effect and negative fluxes during cooling phases were also systematically observed. At a given hourly timescale temperature, there was a negative relationship of the CO2 fluxes with the pre-incubation temperature. Using the combined model allowed the experimental results to be clearly described, including the negative fluxes and the hysteresis effect, showing the potentially large contribution of abiotic fluxes to total fluxes in limed soils, after short-term temperature changes. The fairly good agreement between the measured and simulated flux results also suggested that the biotic flux temperature sensitivity was probably unaffected by timescale (hourly or daily) or pre-incubation temperature. The negative relationship of the CO2 fluxes with the pre-incubation temperature probably derived from very labile soil carbon depletion, as shown in the simulations. This was not, however, confirmed by soil carbon measurements, which leaves open the possibility of adaptation within the microbial community. [less ▲]

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See detailInitiation of methane turbulent flux measurements over a grazed grassland in Belgium
Dumortier, Pierre ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Chopin, Henri ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2013), 15

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See detailModeling soil heterotrophic respiration with an enzyme-based model: first comparison with field data and suggestions of improvements
Buysse, Pauline ULg; Longdoz, Bernard; Debacq, Alain ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2011, April 07), 13

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See detailRespiration of three Belgian crops: Partitioning of total ecosystem respiration in its heterotrophic, above- and below-ground autotrophic components
Suleau, Marie ULg; Moureaux, Christine ULg; Dufranne, Delphine ULg et al

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2011), (151), 633-643

An experimental system combining an eddy covariance system, a micrometeorological station and soil chambers placed in planted areas and in root exclusion zones was installed during three successive years ... [more ▼]

An experimental system combining an eddy covariance system, a micrometeorological station and soil chambers placed in planted areas and in root exclusion zones was installed during three successive years in a production crop managed in a traditional way at the Lonzée experimental site (Belgium). Measurements were made successively on seed potato, winter wheat and sugar beet. The general objectives of the study were, first to evaluate the relative contributions to total ecosystem respiration (TER) of heterotrophic, above ground autotrophic and below ground autotrophic respiration over a succession of three agricultural crops (seed potato, winter wheat and sugar beet) cultivated on successive years at the same location and, secondly, to identify the driving variables of these contributions. Results showed that, during the observation periods, TER was dominated by autotrophic respiration (AR) (60–90%) and that AR was dominated by its above ground component (60–80%). HR was found to increase with temperature and to be independent of Gross Primary Production (GPP), whereas AR was driven by GPP and was mostly independent of temperature. The AR response to GPP was specific to the crop: not only AR intensity but also AR distribution between its above- (ARa) and below- (ARb) ground components were found to differ from one crop to another and, in the winter wheat, from one development stage to another. Generally, ARb contribution to AR was found larger when carbon allocation towards roots was more important. An uncertainty analysis was made and showed that the main sources of uncertainties on the estimates were the spatial variability for soil chamber measurements and uncertainties linked to the data gap filling method for eddy covariance measurements. [less ▲]

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See detailAnnual-scale adaptation of a soil heterotrophic respiration model to three agricultural sites in Belgium and South-Western France.
Buysse, Pauline ULg; Le Dantec, Valérie; Mordelet, Patrick et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2010, May 06), 12

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See detailSensitivity of soil heterotrophic respiration to temperature: short-term impacts.
Buysse, Pauline ULg; Goffin, Stéphanie ULg; Carnol, Monique ULg et al

Poster (2009, September)

Soil respiration is mostly affected by temperature variations but there is still much debate regarding its temperature sensitivity. Especially the difference between short- and long-term responses driven ... [more ▼]

Soil respiration is mostly affected by temperature variations but there is still much debate regarding its temperature sensitivity. Especially the difference between short- and long-term responses driven by changes in microbial activity and population respectively is addressed here. To this end, an incubation experiment is set up with soil samples taken from the surface layer (0-25cm) of a bare area at the Carboeurope agricultural site of Lonzée in Belgium. After homogenization, they are placed into incubators at three different temperatures, namely 5, 15 and 25°C for 2 weeks. Temperature is regulated by Peltier systems that warm up or cool down a bath containing jars with soil samples. All jars are continuously aerated to prevent CO2 from accumulating inside. Moisture levels in the jars are regularly checked and adjusted to ensure that the soil moisture is optimal for soil respiration. Twice a week, short term temperature response is tested by changing incubation temperatures in the range 5 - 35°C. During these cycles, CO2 fluxes are measured at each temperature step with a closed dynamic chamber system. Microbial biomass and hot water-extractable carbon are determined two times during a temperature cycle, allowing a follow up of the evolution of these two variables through a cycle. A comparison between the respiration rates, microbial biomasses and extractable carbon will be presented and would allow a better understanding of the dynamics of the heterotrophic respiration response to temperature in agricultural soils. In the future, other experiments could be derived from this one to focus on substrate availability or soil moisture impacts on soil respiration. [less ▲]

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See detailShort-term temperature impacts on soil respiration.
Buysse, Pauline ULg; Goffin, Stéphanie ULg; Carnol, Monique ULg et al

Poster (2009, June)

Despite considerable recent work on soil heterotrophic respiration, a mechanistic understanding of this process is still missing. Temperature is one of the most important driving factors. It can influence ... [more ▼]

Despite considerable recent work on soil heterotrophic respiration, a mechanistic understanding of this process is still missing. Temperature is one of the most important driving factors. It can influence the mechanism through multiple ways, whose importance may vary with time. An incubation experiment is set up to study short-term temperature influences on soil microbial respiration and its evolution through time. Soil samples are taken in spring from the surface layer (0-25cm) of a bare agricultural loamy soil situated in Lonzée in Belgium (Hesbaye region) and are homogenized before being placed into incubators at three different temperatures, namely 5, 15 and 25°C. Temperature is regulated by Peltier systems that warm up or cool down a sand bath containing jars with soil samples. Once a week, incubation temperatures are increased and decreased by 5°C-steps, starting from each incubator temperature, to achieve a one-day temperature cycle between 5 and 35°C. CO2 flux measurements are performed at each temperature step by a closed dynamic chamber system, after the temperature has stabilized in the samples. Microbial biomass (C and N) is determined four times during the temperature cycle by the fumigation-extraction technique and soil labile carbon is measured at the beginning of each cycle by the hot-water extraction method. Moisture levels in soil samples are regularly checked and adjusted to keep optimal soil moisture content. Between CO2 flux measurements, jars are left open to ensure that anaerobic conditions do not occur. Further investigations could include an assessment of the importance of substrate availability and depletion on microbial activity, and a model development related to the results provided by this experiment. [less ▲]

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See detailWind velocity perturbation of soil respiration measurements using closed dynamic chambers
Suleau, Marie ULg; Debacq, Alain ULg; Dehaes, V. et al

in European Journal of Soil Science (2009), 60(4), 515-524

P>Soil respiration measurements performed with closed dynamic chambers are very sensitive to pressure differences inside and outside the chamber: differences as small as 1 Pa can induce errors that are of ... [more ▼]

P>Soil respiration measurements performed with closed dynamic chambers are very sensitive to pressure differences inside and outside the chamber: differences as small as 1 Pa can induce errors that are of the same magnitude as the flux itself. The problem is usually solved by adding a vent to the experimental set-up. However, although this may give acceptable results in most cases, it is not effective at sites that are very exposed to wind. At the CarboEurope-IP agricultural site of Lonzee (Belgium), on bare soil, we used a vent composed of a vertical tube whose upper end was placed between two horizontal plates. Whilst this system worked properly in low-wind conditions, it led to a significant flux over-estimation (up to 300%) under strong wind conditions. We analysed the causes of this error and attributed it to a dynamic pressure effect at the vent, leading to air aspiration from within the chamber. We suggest that this is because the wind at the vent level was not the same as that experienced in the chamber, because of the large vertical wind speed gradient close to the soil. Another vent geometry was then proposed that positioned the vent at the chamber level. This new design was tested on both manual and automatically operated chambers. It was found to be efficient in windy conditions as most of the artificial correlation between soil respiration measurements and wind speed had disappeared. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon balance assessment of a Belgian winter wheat crop
Moureaux, Christine ULg; Debacq, Alain ULg; Hoyaux, Julien et al

in Global Change Biology (2008), 14(6), 1353-1366

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See detailResponse of autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration to biotic and abiotic factors over a cropland
Suleau, Marie ULg; Debacq, Alain ULg; Moureaux, Christine ULg et al

in Final conference of the programme "The role of soils in the terrestrial carbon balance", European Science Foundation (2007)

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See detailTowards a carbon balance at the Lonzée crop site
Moureaux, Christine ULg; Debacq, Alain ULg; Suleau, Marie ULg et al

Conference (2007)

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See detailCarbon balance of two Belgian crops
Moureaux, Christine ULg; Debacq, Alain ULg; Vilret, Amélie et al

in Open conference on the GHG cycle in the Northern Hemisphere (2006)

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See detailCarbon balance of two Belgian crops
Moureaux, Christine ULg; Debacq, Alain ULg; Vilret, Amélie et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2006), 8(1),

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See detailAnnual net ecosystem carbon exchange by a sugar beet crop
Moureaux, Christine ULg; Debacq, Alain ULg; Bodson, Bernard ULg et al

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2006), 139(1-2), 25-39

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (9 ULg)