References of "De Vos, Martine"
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See detailConsecutive fecal calprotectin measurements to predict relapse in patients with ulcerative colitis receiving infliximab maintenance therapy.
De Vos, Martine; Louis, Edouard ULg; Jahnsen, Jorgen et al

in Inflammatory bowel diseases (2013), 19(10), 2111-7

BACKGROUND: This study examined whether fecal calprotectin can be used in daily practice as a marker to monitor patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) receiving infliximab maintenance therapy. METHODS ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: This study examined whether fecal calprotectin can be used in daily practice as a marker to monitor patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) receiving infliximab maintenance therapy. METHODS: This prospective multicenter study enrolled adult patients with UC in clinical remission under infliximab maintenance therapy. Fecal calprotectin levels were measured every 4 weeks. Sigmoidoscopies were performed at inclusion and at study end. Relapse was defined as a clinical need for change in treatment or an endoscopic Mayo subscore of >/=2 at week 52. Sustained deep remission was defined as a partial Mayo score <3 at all points and an endoscopic Mayo score 0 at week 52. RESULTS: Full analysis was possible for 87 of 113 included patients with UC (77%). Of these patients, 30 (34.4%) were considered to be in sustained deep remission and 13 (14.9%) to have relapsed. Calprotectin levels in patients with sustained deep remission remained very low (median < 40 mg/kg at all time points). Patients who flared had significantly higher calprotectin levels (median > 300 mg/kg) already 3 months before the flare. Further receiver operator curve analysis suggested that a calprotectin level >300 mg/kg had a reasonable sensitivity (58.3%) and specificity (93.3%) to model flare. Two consecutive calprotectin measurements of >300 mg/kg with 1-month interval were identified as the best predictor of flare (61.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity). CONCLUSIONS: Fecal calprotectin can be used in daily practice to monitor patients with UC receiving infliximab maintenance therapy. Two consecutive measurements >300 mg/kg is more specific than a single measurement for predicting relapse. [less ▲]

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See detailHost-microbe interactions have shaped the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease.
Jostins, Luke; Ripke, Stephan; Weersma, Rinse K. et al

in Nature (2012), 491(7422), 119-24

Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), affect over 2.5 million people of European ancestry, with rising prevalence in other populations. Genome ... [more ▼]

Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), affect over 2.5 million people of European ancestry, with rising prevalence in other populations. Genome-wide association studies and subsequent meta-analyses of these two diseases as separate phenotypes have implicated previously unsuspected mechanisms, such as autophagy, in their pathogenesis and showed that some IBD loci are shared with other inflammatory diseases. Here we expand on the knowledge of relevant pathways by undertaking a meta-analysis of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis genome-wide association scans, followed by extensive validation of significant findings, with a combined total of more than 75,000 cases and controls. We identify 71 new associations, for a total of 163 IBD loci, that meet genome-wide significance thresholds. Most loci contribute to both phenotypes, and both directional (consistently favouring one allele over the course of human history) and balancing (favouring the retention of both alleles within populations) selection effects are evident. Many IBD loci are also implicated in other immune-mediated disorders, most notably with ankylosing spondylitis and psoriasis. We also observe considerable overlap between susceptibility loci for IBD and mycobacterial infection. Gene co-expression network analysis emphasizes this relationship, with pathways shared between host responses to mycobacteria and those predisposing to IBD. [less ▲]

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See detailResequencing of positional candidates identifies low frequency IL23R coding variants protecting against inflammatory bowel disease.
Momozawa, Yukihide ULg; Mni, Myriam ULg; Nakamura, Kayo ULg et al

in Nature Genetics (2011), 43(1), 43-7

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified dozens of risk loci for many complex disorders, including Crohn's disease. However, common disease-associated SNPs explain at most approximately 20 ... [more ▼]

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified dozens of risk loci for many complex disorders, including Crohn's disease. However, common disease-associated SNPs explain at most approximately 20% of the genetic variance for Crohn's disease. Several factors may account for this unexplained heritability, including rare risk variants not adequately tagged thus far in GWAS. That rare susceptibility variants indeed contribute to variation in multifactorial phenotypes has been demonstrated for colorectal cancer, plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, blood pressure, type 1 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and, in the case of Crohn's disease, for NOD2 (refs. 14,15). Here we describe the use of high-throughput resequencing of DNA pools to search for rare coding variants influencing susceptibility to Crohn's disease in 63 GWAS-identified positional candidate genes. We identify low frequency coding variants conferring protection against inflammatory bowel disease in IL23R, but we conclude that rare coding variants in positional candidates do not make a large contribution to inherited predisposition to Crohn's disease. [less ▲]

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See detailGastroenterology - Clinical and genetic factors associated with sacroiliitis in Crohn's disease
Peeters, Harald; Cruyssen, Bert Vander; Mielants, Herman et al

in Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (2008), 23(1), 132-137

Background and Aim: Radiographic sacroiliitis (SI), often asymptomatic, is considered the most frequent extra-intestinal manifestation (EIM) of Crohn's disease (CD). Data on the association of SI with ... [more ▼]

Background and Aim: Radiographic sacroiliitis (SI), often asymptomatic, is considered the most frequent extra-intestinal manifestation (EIM) of Crohn's disease (CD). Data on the association of SI with other clinical features of CD are limited. Association of SI with CARD15 polymorphisms has recently been suggested. In a multicenter study, we investigated the association of SI in CD patients with clinical phenotypes, other EIM and CARD15 polymorphisms. Methods: Radiographs of the sacroiliac joints were taken in 251 CD patients from three Belgian university hospitals and scored by two blinded rheumatologists. Clinical features were obtained from medical records. Forty-three percent of patients carried at least one CARD15 polymorphism. Results: Sacroiliitis, defined as the presence of at least grade 2 unilateral changes, was diagnosed in 65 of the 244 scorable radiographs (27%). Only 16 of these patients were previously diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). HLA-B27 positivity was observed in 53% of patients with AS and 7% of patients with radiographic SI. In univariate and multivariate analysis, associations between the presence of SI and peripheral arthritis (P = 0.005) and between AS and uveitis (P = 0.005) were found. No associations with other recorded clinical features or with CARD15 polymorphisms were observed. Conclusion: We confirm the high prevalence of radiographic sacroiliitis in a multicenter CD cohort. Uveitis is only associated with AS whereas all patients with SI are more prone to develop peripheral arthritis during their disease course, suggesting similar pathogenetic mechanisms in the development of these EIM. The previously reported association between SI and CARD15 polymorphisms was not confirmed. [less ▲]

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See detailGenome-wide association defines more than 30 distinct susceptibility loci for Crohn's disease
Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Hansoul, Sarah ULg; Nicolae, Dan L. et al

in Nature Genetics (2008), 40(8), 955-62

Several risk factors for Crohn's disease have been identified in recent genome-wide association studies. To advance gene discovery further, we combined data from three studies on Crohn's disease (a total ... [more ▼]

Several risk factors for Crohn's disease have been identified in recent genome-wide association studies. To advance gene discovery further, we combined data from three studies on Crohn's disease (a total of 3,230 cases and 4,829 controls) and carried out replication in 3,664 independent cases with a mixture of population-based and family-based controls. The results strongly confirm 11 previously reported loci and provide genome-wide significant evidence for 21 additional loci, including the regions containing STAT3, JAK2, ICOSLG, CDKAL1 and ITLN1. The expanded molecular understanding of the basis of this disease offers promise for informed therapeutic development. [less ▲]

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See detailThe TNF/ADAM 17 system: implication of an ADAM 17 haplotype in the clinical response to infliximab in Crohn's disease
Dideberg, Vinciane ULg; Theatre, Emilie ULg; Farnir, Frédéric ULg et al

in European Journal of Clinical Investigation (2007, May), 37(Suppl. 1), 79

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See detailNovel Crohn disease locus identified by genome-wide association maps to a gene desert on 5p13.1 and modulates expression of PTGER4.
Libioulle, Cécile ULg; Louis, Edouard ULg; Hansoul, Sarah ULg et al

in PLoS Genetics (2007), 3(4), 538-543

To identify novel susceptibility loci for Crohn disease (CD), we undertook a genome-wide association study with more than 300,000 SNPs characterized in 547 patients and 928 controls. We found three ... [more ▼]

To identify novel susceptibility loci for Crohn disease (CD), we undertook a genome-wide association study with more than 300,000 SNPs characterized in 547 patients and 928 controls. We found three chromosome regions that provided evidence of disease association with p-values between 10(-6) and 10(-9). Two of these (IL23R on Chromosome 1 and CARD15 on Chromosome 16) correspond to genes previously reported to be associated with CD. In addition, a 250-kb region of Chromosome 5p13.1 was found to contain multiple markers with strongly suggestive evidence of disease association (including four markers with p < 10(-7)). We replicated the results for 5p13.1 by studying 1,266 additional CD patients, 559 additional controls, and 428 trios. Significant evidence of association (p < 4 x 10(-4)) was found in case/control comparisons with the replication data, while associated alleles were over-transmitted to affected offspring (p < 0.05), thus confirming that the 5p13.1 locus contributes to CD susceptibility. The CD-associated 250-kb region was saturated with 111 SNP markers. Haplotype analysis supports a complex locus architecture with multiple variants contributing to disease susceptibility. The novel 5p13.1 CD locus is contained within a 1.25-Mb gene desert. We present evidence that disease-associated alleles correlate with quantitative expression levels of the prostaglandin receptor EP4, PTGER4, the gene that resides closest to the associated region. Our results identify a major new susceptibility locus for CD, and suggest that genetic variants associated with disease risk at this locus could modulate cis-acting regulatory elements of PTGER4. [less ▲]

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See detailImmunogenicity of infliximab: how to handle the problem?
Baert, Filip; De Vos, Martine; Louis, Edouard ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2007), 70(2), 163-70

BACKGROUND: The introduction of infliximab has greatly advanced the therapeutic armamentarium of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Although the benefit/risk ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The introduction of infliximab has greatly advanced the therapeutic armamentarium of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Although the benefit/risk ratio for infliximab is positive, of particular concern has been the problem of immunogenicity ascribed to the chimeric properties of the drug. Antibody formation is associated with allergic reactions and loss of response. AIMS AND METHODS: A literature search was undertaken on the magnitude of the problem of immunogenicity and on the clinical consequences. A survey was conducted about the clinical practice and management of acute and delayed allergic reactions to infliximab in different centres in Belgium. For this, a questionnaire was sent to all members of the Belgian IBD research group (n = 38 belonging to 29 centers). RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Infusion reactions are important immunologic events induced by the presence of a substantial concentration of antibodies against infliximab (ATI) in the serum. Concomitant immunosuppressive treatment may optimize response to infliximab by preventing the formation of antibodies. Steroid administration prior to an infliximab infusion can further reduce the immunogenicity. Probably the most effective strategy to optimize treatment and avoid immunogenicity is maintenance therapy. If infliximab therapy can be discontinued is yet unclear but when treatment goals have been reached, we feel this should be attempted. In the case of relapse, infliximab should be restarted as maintenance long term. Practical guidelines on how to handle the problem of immunogenicity to infliximab are important for clinicians treating patients with IBD. [less ▲]

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See detailBudesonide in Collagenous colitis: A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial With Histologic Follow-Up
Baert, Filip; Schmit, Alain; D'Haens, Geert et al

in Gastroenterology (2002), 122

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See detailAcute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Crohn's Disease: Characteristics of a Unique Series of 34 Patients. Belgian Ibd Research Group
Belaiche, Jacques ULg; Louis, Edouard ULg; D'Haens, Geert et al

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (1999), 94(8), 2177-81

OBJECTIVE: Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a rare complication of Crohn's disease, which represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The aim of this study was to define epidemiological ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a rare complication of Crohn's disease, which represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The aim of this study was to define epidemiological characteristics and therapeutic options of hemorrhagic forms of Crohn's disease. METHODS: Thirty-four cases of hemorrhagic forms of Crohn's disease were studied retrospectively. Acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage was defined as acute rectal bleeding originating in diseased bowel and requiring a transfusion of at least 2 units of red blood cells within 24 h. Upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage or anal lesions and postoperative bleeding were excluded. RESULTS: Mean age at time of hemorrhage was 34.2 +/- 14 yr. Mean duration of disease before the hemorrhage was 5.6 +/- 6 yr. The hemorrhage occurred during a flare up of the disease in 35% of cases. The hemorrhage revealed Crohn's disease in 23.5% of cases. The hemorrhage was more frequent in colonic disease (85%) than in isolated small bowel disease (15%) (p < 0.0001). The origin of bleeding was identified in 65% of cases, by colonoscopy (60%), by angiography (3 patients), or at surgery (1 patient). The bleeding lesion was an ulcer in 95% of cases, most often in the left colon. The treatment was surgical in 20.5% (colectomy in 36%), endoscopical (7 patients, including 5 successes), or medical. Hemorrhage recurred in 12 patients (35%) within a mean time of 3 yr (4 days-8 yr), requiring surgery in 3 cases. No death was observed. CONCLUSIONS: This study performed in a series characterized by a nonsurgical recruitment, the largest to date, shows that hemorrhagic forms of Crohn's disease may reveal disease in 23.5%, occurs in quiescent Crohn's disease in two-thirds of cases. Given the potential efficacy of endoscopical or medical treatment, as well as the absence of mortality, a conservative approach may be suggested as first-line therapy in the majority of patients. [less ▲]

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