References of "De Proft, Michel"
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See detail2. Variétés - 1. Froment d'hiver
Meza Morales, Walter ULg; Couveur, Luc; Eylenbosch, Damien ULg et al

in Bodson, Bernard; Destain, Jean-Pierre (Eds.) Livre Blanc Céréales (2014, September 11)

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See detail7. Lutte intégrée contre les ravageurs
Chavalle, Sandrine; Censier, Florence ULg; Jacquemin, Guillaume et al

in Destain, Jean-Pierre; Bodson, Bernard (Eds.) Livre Blanc Céréales (2014, February)

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See detailIdentification of 1-methyloctyl butanoate as the major sex pheromone component from females of the saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae)
Censier, Florence ULg; Fischer, Christophe ULg; Laurent, Pascal et al

in Chemoecology (2014)

The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), has undergone a resurgence recently as a pest of cereals in Belgium and other European countries. An effective ... [more ▼]

The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), has undergone a resurgence recently as a pest of cereals in Belgium and other European countries. An effective monitoring tool of saddle gall midge flights is needed in order to understand the enigmatic population dynamics of this pest, and to design an integrated management strategy. Therefore, volatile compounds emitted by females (alkan-2-ols and alk-2-yl butanoates) were identified, and the chirality of the emitted esters was determined to be the R absolute configuration. In field-trapping experiments, racemic non-2-yl butanoate attracted substantial numbers of H. marginata males. Thus, this compound will be useful in baited traps for monitoring seasonal flight patterns, and improving integrated management of the saddle gall midge in agricultural systems. [less ▲]

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See detailProtection of winter wheat against orange wheat blossom midge, Sitodiplosis mosellana (Géhin) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae): efficacy of insecticides and cultivar resistance
Chavalle, Sandrine; Censier, Florence ULg; De Proft, Michel et al

in Pest Management Science (2014)

BACKGROUND: In 2012 and 2013, Sitodiplosis mosellana (Géhin) flights occurred during the susceptible phase of wheat development in Belgium. The protection against this midge afforded by various ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: In 2012 and 2013, Sitodiplosis mosellana (Géhin) flights occurred during the susceptible phase of wheat development in Belgium. The protection against this midge afforded by various insecticides was assessed in infested fields on four winter wheat cultivars (susceptible or resistant, and early or late heading). RESULTS: The insecticides sprayed at the right time reduced the number of larvae in the ears by 44-96%, depending on the product. For Julius, the cultivar (cv.) most exposed to S. mosellana in 2013, the mean yield gain resulting from insecticide use was 1,558 kg ha-1 (18%). In the same year, insecticide use resulted in a yield gain of 780 kg ha-1 (8%) for the cv. Lear, despite its resistance to this pest. The link between yield and number of larvae counted in the ears was a logarithmic relationship, suggesting an important reduction in yield caused either by the damage inflicted by young larvae which died at the start of their development or by the activation of costly reactions in plants. CONCLUSION: The study showed that, in cases of severe attack, the timely application of insecticide treatments can protect wheat against S. mosellana and that even resistant cultivars can benefit from these treatments. [less ▲]

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See detailNuisibilité de la cécidomyie équestre, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) et protection du blé tendre d'hiver
Censier, Florence ULg; Chavalle, Sandrine; San Martin y Gomez, Gilles et al

in AFPP - 10ème Conférence Internationale sur les Ravageurs en Agriculture (2014)

These last years, the resurgence of the saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser), has been observed in several European countries and this pest has sometimes inflicted severe damage in ... [more ▼]

These last years, the resurgence of the saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser), has been observed in several European countries and this pest has sometimes inflicted severe damage in cereals. Trials were conducted in heavily infested fields to assess its nuisibility to winter wheat crops. For this purpose, protection schemes including one to four successive applications of lambda-cyhalothrin allowed to vary the exposure period of wheat to the saddle gall midge. The impact of the pest on yield was substantial and closely correlated to the number of galls induced on stems. These trials also showed the importance to synchronize insecticide sprayings with flights to obtain a good efficacy. Eventually they revealed that applying insecticide at the moment of first flights could in some cases reach the larvae still present in the soil. [less ▲]

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See detailUnusual occurrence of cocoons in population of the saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), in Belgium
Censier, Florence ULg; Chavalle, Sandrine; Skuhravá, Marcela et al

in Journal of Insect Science [=JIS] (2014)

The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), is a phytophagous species that develops in saddle-shaped galls on stems of wheat Triticum vulgare, barley Hordeum ... [more ▼]

The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), is a phytophagous species that develops in saddle-shaped galls on stems of wheat Triticum vulgare, barley Hordeum sativum, rye Secale cereale and some other species of Poaceae. Only one generation develops per year. Full-grown larvae leave galls, drop onto the soil where they remain up to the springtime of the following year. Larvae do not usually spin cocoons. However, formation of cocoons by larvae was observed in populations developing in western Europe: in England in 1954, in the Netherlands in the 1960s and in Belgium in 2011. On the basis of our analysis, a part of the larval population forms cocoons as protection against unfavorable weather conditions, especially drought. [less ▲]

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See detailVariétés - 1. Froment d'hiver
Meza Morales, Walter; Mahieu, O.; Heens, Benoît et al

in Destain, Jean-Pierre; Bodson, Bernard (Eds.) Livre Blanc céréales (2013, September 12)

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See detailIntegrated management of wild chamomile populations by tillage
Jaunard, Delphine ULg; Monty, Arnaud ULg; Mahy, Grégory ULg et al

in Agricultural and Apllied Biological Sciences (2013, May 21)

Gembloux, Belgium Chemical weeding in agriculture increasingly raises environmental, health and economic preoccupations. European authorities has set up legislations (directive 91/414, settlement 1107 ... [more ▼]

Gembloux, Belgium Chemical weeding in agriculture increasingly raises environmental, health and economic preoccupations. European authorities has set up legislations (directive 91/414, settlement 1107/2009, directive 2009/128) aiming to reduce risks related to the use of pesticides and encouraging integrated pest management. This situation leads professionals and scientists to take interest in the biology and population dynamics of weeds and to study the impacts of integrated pest management on weeds and crops. Tillage can potentially be an efficient weed control method in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). We studied wild chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) population dynamics and crop yields in an experimental winter wheat crop, in relation to tillage methods. Five modalities (i.e. different combinations of a stubble cultivator and/or a moldboard plow, including a no-tillage control) were applied during three years (2009-2012), with four replications, in Gembloux (Belgium). In each plot, M. chamomilla density was recorded throughout the seasons. In summer 2012, wild chamomile density was significantly lower in plots tilled with a moldboard plow. The use of a stubble cultivator did not significantly affect M. chamomilla density. In addition, we found higher wheat yields in ploughed plots, indicating that the decrease in M. chamomilla density reduced competition for wheat. To confirm these results, experiments are still under investigation in similar conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailStudy on the sensitivity of three oat varieties to the saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae)
Censier, Florence ULg; Chavalle, Sandrine; San Martin y Gomez, Gilles et al

Poster (2013, May)

Saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) is a univoltine pest of cereals which occurs in Europe. The larvae overwinter in the soil. During the spring, the new emerged females lay eggs on the ... [more ▼]

Saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) is a univoltine pest of cereals which occurs in Europe. The larvae overwinter in the soil. During the spring, the new emerged females lay eggs on the leaves of cereals and grasses. After hatching, larvae migrate under the leaf sheath, where they develop at the expense of the plant. As a reaction, stems induce saddle-shaped galls of 5 to 10 mm long. Numerous galls can lead to stem breaks and important yield losses when they are numerous. After 40 years without any reporting, large populations of H. marginata and important damage have been observed since 2010 in wheat crops in Belgium, especially in the Flemish Polders where clay soils and intensive farming of cereals favour heavy infestations. According to some research conducted in the 60s during the last outbreak, oat (Avena sativa L.) is known to be one of the less attractive hosts to the saddle gall midge. Our study was thus performed in order to assess the host sensitivity of three oat varieties currently grown in Belgium (Evita, Effektiv and Freddy). Therefore, oat varieties were sown on infested ground in two separate enclosures in a glasshouse. In the first enclosure, only the three oat varieties were grown ; in the second one, these three oat varieties were grown together with two varieties of spring wheat (Granny and KWS Chamsin). Two parameters were measured: the percentage of leaves with laid eggs, and the number of galls per stem. The percentage of leaves with eggs showed that the infestation is significantly lower on oats when they are in presence of wheat. The infestation was also significantly higher on wheat than on oat, which means oat is a much less favoured host plant than spring wheat for laying. Oat varieties were significantly different regarding the number of galls per stem, but with very little damage compared to wheat. The Freddy variety even seemed to be completely resistant to saddle gall midge, as no galls were observed although there were a similar percentage of leaves with eggs for the three oat varieties. Cropping oat could thus contribute to reduce or even to eliminate infestations of H. marginata. [less ▲]

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See detail3. Contrôle des populations de mauvaises herbes
Jaunard, Delphine ULg; Monty, Arnaud ULg; Mahy, Grégory ULg et al

in Bodson, Bernard; Destain, Jean-Pierre (Eds.) Livre Blanc - Céréales (2013, February 27)

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See detail6. Lutte intégrée contre les maladies
Duvivier, Maxime; Mahieu, Olivier; Heens, B. et al

in Bodson, Bernard; Destain, Jean-Pierre (Eds.) Livre Blanc - Céréales (2013, February 27)

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See detail7. Lutte intégrée contre les ravageurs
Chavalle, Sandrine; Censier, Florence ULg; De Proft, Michel

in Destain, Jean-Pierre; Bodson, Bernard (Eds.) Livre Blanc Céréales (2013, February)

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See detailStudy on the sensitivity of three oat varieties to the saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae)
Censier, Florence ULg; Chavalle, Sandrine; San Martin y Gomez, Gilles et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2013), 78(2), 287-292

The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser, 1840) is a univoltine pest of cereals which occurs in Europe. The larvae feed on stems and attractive saddle-shaped depressions, driving to ... [more ▼]

The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser, 1840) is a univoltine pest of cereals which occurs in Europe. The larvae feed on stems and attractive saddle-shaped depressions, driving to important yield losses when the galls are numerous. After 40 years without any reporting, large populations of H. marginata and important damage have been observed since 2010 in wheat crops in Belgium, especially in the Flemish Polders where clay soils and intensive farming of cereals favour heavy infestations. According to some research conducted in the 1960s during the last outbreak, oat (Avena sativa L.) is known to be one of the less favourable hosts to the saddle gall midge. Our study was performed in order to assess the host sensitivity of three oat varieties currently grown in Belgium: EVITA, EFFEKTIV and FREDDY. Therefore, oat varieties were sown on infested soil in two separate enclosures in a glasshouse. In the first enclosure, only the three oat varieties were grown; in the second one, these three oat varieties were grown together with two varieties of spring wheat: GRANNY and KWS CHAMSIN. Two parameters were measured: the percentage of leaves with laid eggs, and the number of galls per stem. The percentage of leaves with eggs showed that the infestation was significantly lower on oats when they were in presence of wheat. The egg infestation was also significantly higher on wheat than on oat, which means oat is a much less favourable host plant than spring wheat for egg laying. Oat varieties were significantly different from each other regarding the number of galls per stem, but with very little damage compared to wheat. The FREDDY variety even seemed to be completely resistant to saddle gall midge, as no galls were observed although there was a similar percentage of leaves with eggs for the three oat varieties. Cropping oat could thus contribute to reduce infestations of H. marginata. [less ▲]

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See detail2. Variétés - 1. Froment d'hiver
Seutin, Benoit ULg; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Vancutsem, Françoise ULg et al

in Destain, Jean-Pierre; Bodson, Bernard (Eds.) Livre Blanc - Céréales - Gembloux (2012, September 06)

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See detailEffect of mechanical weeding on wild Chamomile populations in winter wheat crop
Jaunard, Delphine ULg; Monty, Arnaud ULg; Henriet, François et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2012, May 22)

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See detailChemical control of Haplodiplosis marginata (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae)
Censier, Florence ULg; Chavalle, Sandrine; Wittouck, Daniël et al

Poster (2012, May)

The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser), is a European pest of cereals. The larvae overwinter into the soil. Emergence of adult midges occurred during the spring and after mating ... [more ▼]

The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser), is a European pest of cereals. The larvae overwinter into the soil. Emergence of adult midges occurred during the spring and after mating, females lay their eggs on the leaves of cereals and several grasses. Eggs hatch a few days later; young larvae crawl to the stem and introduce themselves between the leaf sheath and the stem, were the larvae develop. As reaction of the presence of midge larvae, stem produce a longitudinal depression of 6-7 mm ended by two ridges looking as a horse saddle. When galls are numerous, they can cause break of stems and important yield losses. The saddle gall midge, which is a major pest in Central Europe, is not very well known in the Western part of the continent. It had already caused huge damage during outbreak periods. The last one reported in Belgium and in The Netherlands occurred between 1965 and 1970. Later, it was never reported again until 2010, where large populations and severe damage were observed, especially in the Flemish polders, a region with clay soils where wheat is cropped intensively. Faced with the resurgence of this pest, we sought to develop effective curative control. To date, crops chemical protection seems to be the only solution in case of heavy emergences. Experimentation was conducted in a highly infested field (Meetkerke, Belgian Polders), according to a randomized complete block arrangement with four replications. Foremost, a lambdacyhalothrin-based insecticide was used to evaluate efficiency of several protection schemes, ranging between one and four spray(s). The large spread of flights observed during the 2011 spring allowed to highlight the effect of treatment date on the attack intensity and also on the galls distribution along the stem, on the different internodes. Moreover, several insecticides already registrated in cereals against aphids were compared for their efficacy against saddle gall midge. Studied pyrethroids have shown a very good efficacy, ranging between 75 % and 87 %, when applied twice with a 2 weeks interval. To be efficient, chemical spray must be synchronized with the flights and egg laying periods. Monitoring the phenology of flights is thus essential as part of integrated pest management against saddle gall midge. [less ▲]

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See detail10. Perspectives - Dynamique des populations de trois adventices des céréales en vue de la mise au point de méthodes intégrées de leur contrôle
Jaunard, Delphine ULg; Henriet, François; Monty, Arnaud ULg et al

in Livre Blanc - Céréales - Gembloux (2012, February 29)

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See detailPièges à cécidomyies : des outils pour la lutte intégrée
Chavalle, Sandrine; Censier, Florence ULg; De Proft, Michel

in Destain, Jean-Pierre; Bodson, Bernard (Eds.) Livre Blanc Céréales (2012, February)

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See detailLa cécidomyie équestre : un ravageur à tenir à l'oeil
Censier, Florence ULg; Chavalle, Sandrine; De Proft, Michel et al

in Destain, Jean-Pierre; Bodson, Bernard (Eds.) Livre Blanc Céréales (2012, February)

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See detailChemical control of Haplodiplosis marginata von Roser (Diptera : Cecidomyiidae)
Censier, Florence ULg; Chavalle, Sandrine; Wittouck, Daniel et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2012), 78(4), 667-675

The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser), has been detected in Belgium since 2010, after several decades without any reporting. It had indeed caused serious damages between 1965 and 1970 ... [more ▼]

The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser), has been detected in Belgium since 2010, after several decades without any reporting. It had indeed caused serious damages between 1965 and 1970. This insect is a European cereal pest whose larvae feed on stems and engender saddle-shaped depressions, resulting in yield losses. Face with the resurgence of this pest, it was decided to study its spatial distribution and, because serious damages were observed in some regions, to develop effective curative control. To date, chemical protection seems to be the only immediate solution in case of heavy emergences. Experimentation was conducted in a highly infested field (Meetkerke, Belgian Polders), according to a randomized complete blocks arrangement with four replications. Foremost, a lambdacyhalothrin-based insecticide was used to evaluate efficiency of several protection schemes, ranging between one and four spray(s). The large spread of flights observed during the 2011 spring allowed to highlight the effect of treatment date on the attack intensity and also on the galls distribution along the stem, on the different internodes: the lower internodes were protected by the early sprayings, while last sprayings induced reduction of galls number on the upper internodes. Moreover, several insecticides already registrated in cereals against aphids were compared for their efficacy against saddle gall midge. Studied pyrethroids have shown a very good efficacy, ranging between 75 % and 87 %, when applied twice with a 2 weeks interval. To be efficient, insecticide applications must thus be synchronized with the flights and egg-laying periods. Monitoring the phenology of flights is thus essential as part of integrated pest management against saddle gall midge. [less ▲]

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