References of "Darchambeau, François"
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See detailDivergent biophysical controls of aquatic CO2 and CH4 in the World’s two largest rivers
Borges, Alberto ULg; Abril, G; Darchambeau, François ULg et al

in Scientific Reports (2015), 5

Carbon emissions to the atmosphere from inland waters are globally significant and mainly occur at tropical latitudes. However, processes controlling the intensity of CO2 and CH4 emissions from tropical ... [more ▼]

Carbon emissions to the atmosphere from inland waters are globally significant and mainly occur at tropical latitudes. However, processes controlling the intensity of CO2 and CH4 emissions from tropical inland waters remain poorly understood. Here, we report a data-set of concurrent measurements of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and dissolved CH4 concentrations in the Amazon (n = 136) and the Congo (n = 280) Rivers. The pCO2 values in the Amazon mainstem were significantly higher than in the Congo, contrasting with CH4 concentrations that were higher in the Congo than in the Amazon. Large-scale patterns in pCO2 across different lowland tropical basins can be apprehended with a relatively simple statistical model related to the extent of wetlands within the basin, showing that, in addition to non-flooded vegetation, wetlands also contribute to CO2 in river channels. On the other hand, dynamics of dissolved CH4 in river channels are less straightforward to predict, and are related to the way hydrology modulates the connectivity between wetlands and river channels. [less ▲]

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See detailPelagic photoferrotrophy and iron cycling in a modern ferruginous basin
Llirós, Marc; García–Armisen, Tamara; Darchambeau, François ULg et al

in Scientific Reports (2015), 5

Iron-rich (ferruginous) ocean chemistry prevailed throughout most of Earth’s early history. Before the evolution and proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis, biological production in the ferruginous ... [more ▼]

Iron-rich (ferruginous) ocean chemistry prevailed throughout most of Earth’s early history. Before the evolution and proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis, biological production in the ferruginous oceans was likely driven by photoferrotrophic bacteria that oxidize ferrous iron {Fe(II)} to harness energy from sunlight, and fix inorganic carbon into biomass. Photoferrotrophs may thus have fuelled Earth’s early biosphere providing energy to drive microbial growth and evolution over billions of years. Yet, photoferrotrophic activity has remained largely elusive on the modern Earth, leaving models for early biological production untested and imperative ecological context for the evolution of life missing. Here, we show that an active community of pelagic photoferrotrophs comprises up to 30% of the total microbial community in illuminated ferruginous waters of Kabuno Bay (KB), East Africa (DR Congo). These photoferrotrophs produce oxidized iron {Fe(III)} and biomass, and support a diverse pelagic microbial community including heterotrophic Fe(III)-reducers, sulfate reducers, fermenters and methanogens. At modest light levels, rates of photoferrotrophy in KB exceed those predicted for early Earth primary production, and are sufficient to generate Earth’s largest sedimentary iron ore deposits. Fe cycling, however, is efficient, and complex microbial community interactions likely regulate Fe(III) and organic matter export from the photic zone. [less ▲]

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See detailBacterial community composition in three freshwater reservoirs of di erent alkalinity and trophic status
Llirós, Marc; Inceoglu, Ozgul; Garcia-Armisen, Tamara et al

Poster (2015, August 23)

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See detailRiver geochemistry, chemical weathering, and atmospheric CO2 consumption rates in the Virunga Volcanic Province (East Africa)
Balagizi, Charles M.; Darchambeau, François ULg; Bouillon, Steven et al

in Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems (2015), 16

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See detailContribution of cyanobacteria to the building of travertines in a calcareous stream
Wilmotte, Annick ULg; Golubic, Stjepko; Kleinteich, Julia et al

Poster (2015, August 03)

The ambient temperature travertine deposits of the calcareous Hoyoux River (Modave, Belgium) and several tributaries are organized and promoted by the filamentous cyanobacterium identified by its ... [more ▼]

The ambient temperature travertine deposits of the calcareous Hoyoux River (Modave, Belgium) and several tributaries are organized and promoted by the filamentous cyanobacterium identified by its morphotype and ecological properties as Phormidium cf. incrustatum. A combination of techniques was used to study this biotope: physico-chemical parameters and CO2 measurements, Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy, RAMAN microspectroscopy. A molecular diversity study with pyrosequencing of the cyanobacterial 16S rRNA is in progress. A potential candidate was isolated in culture. [less ▲]

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See detailGlobally significant greenhouse-gas emissions from African inland waters
Borges, Alberto ULg; Darchambeau, François ULg; Teodoru, Cristian R. et al

in Nature Geoscience (2015), advance online publication

Carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere from inland waters[mdash]streams, rivers, lakes and reservoirs[mdash]are nearly equivalent to ocean and land sinks globally. Inland waters can be an important ... [more ▼]

Carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere from inland waters[mdash]streams, rivers, lakes and reservoirs[mdash]are nearly equivalent to ocean and land sinks globally. Inland waters can be an important source of methane and nitrous oxide emissions as well, but emissions are poorly quantified, especially in Africa. Here we report dissolved carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide concentrations from 12 rivers in sub-Saharan Africa, including seasonally resolved sampling at 39 sites, acquired between 2006 and 2014. Fluxes were calculated from published gas transfer velocities, and upscaled to the area of all sub-Saharan African rivers using available spatial data sets. Carbon dioxide-equivalent emissions from river channels alone were about 0.4 Pg carbon per year, equivalent to two-thirds of the overall net carbon land sink previously reported for Africa. Including emissions from wetlands of the Congo river increases the total carbon dioxide-equivalent greenhouse-gas emissions to about 0.9 Pg carbon per year, equivalent to about one quarter of the global ocean and terrestrial combined carbon sink. Riverine carbon dioxide and methane emissions increase with wetland extent and upland biomass. We therefore suggest that future changes in wetland and upland cover could strongly affect greenhouse-gas emissions from African inland waters. [less ▲]

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See detailPhytoplankton abundance and diversity in the Congo river at high and low waters
Stoyneva, MP; Descy, JP; Bouillon, S et al

Conference (2015, July 05)

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See detailLandscape Control on the Spatial and Temporal Variability of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter and Dissolved Organic Carbon in Large African Rivers
Lambert, Thibault ULg; Darchambeau, François ULg; Bouillon, Steven et al

in Ecosystems (2015)

The characteristics of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) as well as the concentrations and stable isotope composition (d 13 C) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were characterized in several large ... [more ▼]

The characteristics of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) as well as the concentrations and stable isotope composition (d 13 C) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were characterized in several large rivers of Africa including the Congo, Niger, Zambezi, and Ogooué basins. We compared the spatial and temporal patterns of dissolved organic matter (DOM) quantity and quality along with various environmental gradients, including hydrology, river size, catchment vegetation, and connectivity to land. The optical proxies used include the absorption coefficient at 350 nm, the specific ultraviolet absorbance, and the spectral slope ratio (S R = 275–295-nm slope divided by 350–400-nm slope). Our results show that land cover plays a primary role in controlling both DOC concentration and optical properties of DOM in tropical freshwaters. A higher cover of dense forest in the catchment leads to a higher quantity of highly aromatic DOM in the river network, whereas an increasing savannah cover results in lower DOC concentrations and less absorptive DOM. In addition to land cover, the watershed morphology (expressed by the average slope) exerts a strong control on DOC and CDOM in tropical rivers. Our results also show that the percentage of C3 and C4 vegetation cover is not an accurate predictor for DOM and CDOM quality in rivers due to the importance of the spatial distribution of land cover within the drainage network. The comparison of our results with previously published CDOM data in temperate and high-latitude rivers highlights that DOM in tropical freshwa-ters is generally more aromatic, and shows a higher capacity for absorbing sunlight irradiance. [less ▲]

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See detailVertical Distribution of Functional Potential and Active Microbial Communities in Meromictic Lake Kivu
İnceoğlu, Özgul; Llirós, Marc; Crowe, Sean A. et al

in Microbial Ecology (2015)

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See detailApplication of stable isotopes in trophic ecology: importance of TEF and seasonal baseline for robust interpretations.
Remy, François ULg; Darchambeau, François ULg; Dauby, Patrick ULg et al

Conference (2015, April 02)

Nitrogen, carbon and sulfur stable isotopes are very powerful tools for trophic ecologists to delineate food webs of various ecosystems. More recently… the use of mixing models has exponentially increased ... [more ▼]

Nitrogen, carbon and sulfur stable isotopes are very powerful tools for trophic ecologists to delineate food webs of various ecosystems. More recently… the use of mixing models has exponentially increased to give a more specific vision of organism’s diets and trophic relationships. Two case studies will be presented to give a summary of what’s been done in Liège Oceanology Lab to improve our interpretation of stable isotopes results. First is an experimental calculation of the Trophic Enrichment Factors (TEFs) for one dominant detritivorous species of Mediterranean amphipod inhabiting seagrass detritus: Gammarus aequicauda (Martynov, 1931). This experimental study was planned after a strange result of the SAIR mixing model, giving results opposed to all observations and knowledge we had about this species. Thus, the impact of 3 very different food sources (amphipod powder, algae power, seagrass powder) on the turnover rate of C and N isotopic compositions was tested, and afterwards TEFs for C and N for each source were calculated. Animal food source showed to be the most effectively assimilated with a fast turnover rate while seagrass and algae showed very slow assimilation. TEFs calculations showed to be interesting because TEFs seem not to depend on the natural feeding type of the invertebrate but more on the type of food source. Animal source showed carnivorous TEFs values while seagrass and algae source showed typical detritivorous values. SIAR results with these new custom values gave more coherent values highlighting the major importance of TEFs values for mixing models data interpretation. Second is a simple question: are the seasonal isotopic composition variations observed for many seagrass detritus macrofauna species due to actual diet changes, or only to isotopic baseline shift of the food sources? Macrofauna and all potential food sources were sampled near STARESO Oceanographic Station (Corsica, 8°45’E; 42°35’N) in 2011-2012 at each season at two different sites. SIBER software runs with C and N isotopic data showed spatio-temporal isotopic variations at community, interspecific and intraspecific level. SIBER did not gave us information about the origin of these changes, but coupled with SIAR and our custom TEFs, species actually showing drastic changes of diet were identified, while others seem to reflect more a source baseline isotopic composition shift. Working at specific level is compulsory for fine conclusions. These two case studies highlight the importance of mixing model use and of accurate TEF values to run these models properly to draw robust and reliable conclusions using stable isotopic data. [less ▲]

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See detailInorhanic and organic carbon spatial variability in the Congo River during high waters (December 2013) and low waters (June 2014)
Borges, Alberto ULg; Bouillon, S; Teodoru, C et al

Conference (2015, February 23)

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See detailBiogeochemistry of the Congo River: annual transport fluxes and sources of carbon in the upper Congo River (Kisangani, DRC Congo)
Bouillon; Tambwe; Mambo, T et al

Conference (2015, February 22)

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See detailPlankton diversity and metabolism in the Congo River during high waters (December 2013) and low waters (June 2014)
Darchambeau, François ULg; Descy, JP; Leporcq, B et al

Poster (2015, February 22)

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See detailCyanobacteria - the constructors of travertines?
Kleinteich, Julia; Stelmach Pessi, Igor ULg; Velazquez, David et al

Conference (2015, February)

Cyanobacteria are participating in carbonate build-up and travertine formation in the Belgian river Hoyoux and its tributaries. In this study, we sampled calcareous material from travertines and oncoliths ... [more ▼]

Cyanobacteria are participating in carbonate build-up and travertine formation in the Belgian river Hoyoux and its tributaries. In this study, we sampled calcareous material from travertines and oncoliths from four sampling sites on the Hoyoux river and Triffoy brook. In addition, the water chemistry was determined. The structure of the material was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman microscopy (?°. The dominant cyanobacterial species was isolated and identified on the basis of microscopic observation and amplification of the 16S-ITS fragment as Phormidium sp., likely functioning as the ‘architect’ of the travertine system. In order to describe the full diversity of the travertine system and to discriminate between the active fraction and inactive or dead organic matter, DNA as well as RNA was extracted from the travertine material, amplified using cyanobacteria specific primers and sequenced by 454 pyrosequencing. To detect seasonal changes in the biological activity, summer and winter time points were compared. This study reveals the ecology of an overlooked environment in Belgian river systems and tries to explain the build-up of travertines. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamics of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O) along the Zambezi River and major tributaries, and their importance in the riverine carbon budget
Teodoru, C. R.; Nyoni, F. C.; Borges, Alberto ULg et al

in Biogeosciences (2015), 12(8), 2431-2453

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See detailThe age of river-transported carbon: A global perspective
Marwick, Trent R.; Tamooh, Fredrick; Teodoru, Cristian R. et al

in Global Biogeochemical Cycles (2015), 29(2), 122--137

The role played by river networks in regional and global carbon (C) budgets is receiving increasing attention. Despite the potential of radiocarbon measurements (Δ14C) to elucidate sources and cycling of ... [more ▼]

The role played by river networks in regional and global carbon (C) budgets is receiving increasing attention. Despite the potential of radiocarbon measurements (Δ14C) to elucidate sources and cycling of different riverine C pools, there remain large regions for which no data are available and no comprehensive attempts to synthesize the available information and examine global patterns in the 14C content of different riverine C pools. Here we present new 14C data on particulate and dissolved organic C (POC and DOC) from six river basins in tropical and subtropical Africa and compiled >1400 literature Δ14C data and ancillary parameters from rivers globally. Our analysis reveals a consistent pattern whereby POC is progressively older in systems carrying higher sediment loads, coinciding with a lower organic carbon content. At the global scale, this pattern leads to a proposed global median Δ14C signature of −203‰, corresponding to an age of ~1800 years B.P. For DOC exported to the coastal zone, we predict a modern (decadal) age (Δ14C = +22 to +46‰), and paired data sets confirm that riverine DOC is generally more recent in origin than POC—in contrast to the situation in ocean environments. Weathering regimes complicate the interpretation of 14C ages of dissolved inorganic carbon, but the available data favor the hypothesis that in most cases, more recent organic C is preferentially mineralized. [less ▲]

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See detailTechnical Note: Large overestimation of pCO2 calculated from pH and alkalinity in acidic, organic-rich freshwaters
Abril, G; Bouillon, S; Darchambeau, François ULg et al

in Biogeosciences (2015), 12(1), 67-78

Inland waters have been recognized as a significant source of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere at the global scale. Fluxes of CO2 between aquatic systems and the atmosphere are calculated from the ... [more ▼]

Inland waters have been recognized as a significant source of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere at the global scale. Fluxes of CO2 between aquatic systems and the atmosphere are calculated from the gas transfer velocity and the water–air gradient of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Currently, direct measurements of water pCO2 remain scarce in freshwaters, and most published pCO2 data are calculated from temperature, pH and total alkalinity (TA). Here, we compare calculated (pH and TA) and measured (equilibrator and headspace) water pCO2 in a large array of temperate and tropical freshwaters. The 761 data points cover a wide range of values for TA (0 to 14 200 μmol L􀀀1), pH (3.94 to 9.17), measured pCO2 (36 to 23 000 ppmv), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (29 to 3970 μmol L􀀀1). Calculated pCO2 were >10% higher than measured pCO2 in 60% of the samples (with a median overestimation of calculated pCO2 compared to measured pCO2 of 2560 ppmv) and were >100% higher in the 25% most organic-rich and acidic samples (with a median overestimation of 9080 ppmv). We suggest these large overestimations of calculated pCO2 with respect to measured pCO2 are due to the combination of two cumulative effects: (1) a more significant contribution of organic acids anions to TA in waters with low carbonate alkalinity and high DOC concentrations; (2) a lower buffering capacity of the carbonate system at low pH, which increases the sensitivity of calculated pCO2 to TA in acidic and organicrich waters. No empirical relationship could be derived from our data set in order to correct calculated pCO2 for this bias. Owing to the widespread distribution of acidic, organic-rich freshwaters, we conclude that regional and global estimates of CO2 outgassing from freshwaters based on pH and TA data only are most likely overestimated, although the magnitude of the overestimation needs further quantitative analysis. Direct measurements of pCO2 are recommended in inland waters in general, and in particular in acidic, poorly buffered freshwaters [less ▲]

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See detailMethanotrophy within the water column of a large meromictic tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa)
Morana, C.; Borges, Alberto ULg; Roland, Fleur ULg et al

in Biogeosciences (2015), 12(7), 2077-2088

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See detailBacterial Community Composition in Three Freshwater Reservoirs of Different Alkalinity and Trophic Status
Llirós, Marc; Inceoğlu, Özgul; García-Armisen, Tamara et al

in PLoS ONE (2014)

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