References of "Dang Vu, Thien Thanh"
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See detailSleep and Movement Disorders: Neuroimaging Aspects
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Ratti, Pietro-Luca et al

in Chokroverty, Sudhansu; Montagna, Pasquale; Allen, Richard (Eds.) et al Sleep and Movement Disorders (in press)

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See detailInteraction between hippocampal and striatal systems predicts subsequent consolidation of motor sequence memory.
Albouy, Geneviève; Sterpenich, Virginie; Vandewalle, Gilles ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(3), 59490

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See detailCircadian preference modulates the neural substrate of conflict processing across the day
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Leclercq, Yves ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(1), 29658

Human morning and evening chronotypes differ in their preferred timing for sleep and wakefulness, as well as in optimal daytime periods to cope with cognitive challenges. Recent evidence suggests that ... [more ▼]

Human morning and evening chronotypes differ in their preferred timing for sleep and wakefulness, as well as in optimal daytime periods to cope with cognitive challenges. Recent evidence suggests that these preferences are not a simple by-product of socio-professional timing constraints, but can be driven by inter-individual differences in the expression of circadian and homeostatic sleep-wake promoting signals. Chronotypes thus constitute a unique tool to access the interplay between those processes under normally entrained day-night conditions, and to investigate how they impinge onto higher cognitive control processes. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we assessed the influence of chronotype and time-of-day on conflict processing-related cerebral activity throughout a normal waking day. Sixteen morning and 15 evening types were recorded at two individually adapted time points (1.5 versus 10.5 hours spent awake) while performing the Stroop paradigm. Results show that interference-related hemodynamic responses are maintained or even increased in evening types from the subjective morning to the subjective evening in a set of brain areas playing a pivotal role in successful inhibitory functioning, whereas they decreased in morning types under the same conditions. Furthermore, during the evening hours, activity in a posterior hypothalamic region putatively involved in sleep-wake regulation correlated in a chronotype-specific manner with slow wave activity at the beginning of the night, an index of accumulated homeostatic sleep pressure. These results shed light into the cerebral mechanisms underlying inter-individual differences of higher-order cognitive state maintenance under normally entrained day-night conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailThe fate of incoming stimuli during NREM sleep is determined by spindles and the phase of the slow oscillation
Schabus, M.; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Heib, D. P. J. et al

in Frontiers in Neurology (2012), 3(40), 1-11

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See detailCovert waking brain activity reveals instantaneous sleep depth.
McKinney, Scott M; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Buxton, Orfeu M et al

in PLoS ONE (2011), 6(3), 17351

The neural correlates of the wake-sleep continuum remain incompletely understood, limiting the development of adaptive drug delivery systems for promoting sleep maintenance. The most useful measure for ... [more ▼]

The neural correlates of the wake-sleep continuum remain incompletely understood, limiting the development of adaptive drug delivery systems for promoting sleep maintenance. The most useful measure for resolving early positions along this continuum is the alpha oscillation, an 8-13 Hz electroencephalographic rhythm prominent over posterior scalp locations. The brain activation signature of wakefulness, alpha expression discloses immediate levels of alertness and dissipates in concert with fading awareness as sleep begins. This brain activity pattern, however, is largely ignored once sleep begins. Here we show that the intensity of spectral power in the alpha band actually continues to disclose instantaneous responsiveness to noise--a measure of sleep depth--throughout a night of sleep. By systematically challenging sleep with realistic and varied acoustic disruption, we found that sleepers exhibited markedly greater sensitivity to sounds during moments of elevated alpha expression. This result demonstrates that alpha power is not a binary marker of the transition between sleep and wakefulness, but carries rich information about immediate sleep stability. Further, it shows that an empirical and ecologically relevant form of sleep depth is revealed in real-time by EEG spectral content in the alpha band, a measure that affords prediction on the order of minutes. This signal, which transcends the boundaries of classical sleep stages, could potentially be used for real-time feedback to novel, adaptive drug delivery systems for inducing sleep. [less ▲]

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See detailDepression alters "top-down" visual attention: a dynamic causal modeling comparison between depressed and healthy subjects.
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Schwartz, Sophie; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2011), 54(2), 1662-8

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we recently demonstrated that nonmedicated patients with a first episode of unipolar major depression (MDD) compared to matched controls exhibited an ... [more ▼]

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we recently demonstrated that nonmedicated patients with a first episode of unipolar major depression (MDD) compared to matched controls exhibited an abnormal neural filtering of irrelevant visual information (Desseilles et al., 2009). During scanning, subjects performed a visual attention task imposing two different levels of attentional load at fixation (low or high), while task-irrelevant colored stimuli were presented in the periphery. In the present study, we focused on the visuo-attentional system and used "Dynamic Causal Modeling" (DCM) on the same dataset to assess how attention influences a network of three dynamically-interconnected brain regions (visual areas V1 and V4, and intraparietal sulcus (P), differentially in MDD patients and healthy controls. Bayesian model selection (BMS) and model space partitioning (MSP) were used to determine the best model in each population. The best model for the controls revealed that the increase of parietal activity by high attention load was selectively associated with a negative modulation of P on V4, consistent with high attention reducing the processing of irrelevant colored peripheral stimuli. The best model accounting for the data from the MDD patients showed that both low and high attention levels exerted modulatory effects on P. The present results document abnormal effective connectivity across visuo-attentional networks in MDD, which likely contributes to deficient attentional filtering of information. [less ▲]

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See detailInterplay between spontaneous and induced brain activity during human non-rapid eye movement sleep.
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Bonjean, Maxime; Schabus, Manuel et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2011), 108(37), 15438-43

Humans are less responsive to the surrounding environment during sleep. However, the extent to which the human brain responds to external stimuli during sleep is uncertain. We used simultaneous EEG and ... [more ▼]

Humans are less responsive to the surrounding environment during sleep. However, the extent to which the human brain responds to external stimuli during sleep is uncertain. We used simultaneous EEG and functional MRI to characterize brain responses to tones during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Sounds during wakefulness elicited responses in the thalamus and primary auditory cortex. These responses persisted in NREM sleep, except throughout spindles, during which they became less consistent. When sounds induced a K complex, activity in the auditory cortex was enhanced and responses in distant frontal areas were elicited, similar to the stereotypical pattern associated with slow oscillations. These data show that sound processing during NREM sleep is constrained by fundamental brain oscillatory modes (slow oscillations and spindles), which result in a complex interplay between spontaneous and induced brain activity. The distortion of sensory information at the thalamic level, especially during spindles, functionally isolates the cortex from the environment and might provide unique conditions favorable for off-line memory processing. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural precursors of delayed insight
Darsaud, Annabelle ULg; Wagner, Ullrich; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2011), 23(8), 1900-1910

The solution of a problem left unresolved in the evening can sometimes pop into mind as a sudden insight after a night of sleep in the following morning. Although favorable effects of sleep on insightful ... [more ▼]

The solution of a problem left unresolved in the evening can sometimes pop into mind as a sudden insight after a night of sleep in the following morning. Although favorable effects of sleep on insightful behavior have been experimentally confirmed, the neural mechanisms determining this delayed insight remain unknown. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we characterize the neural precursors of delayed insight in the number reduction task (NRT), in which a hidden task structure can be learned implicitly, but can also be recognized explicitly in an insightful process, allowing immediate qualitative improvement in task performance. Normal volunteers practiced the NRT during two fMRI sessions (training and retest), taking place 12 hours apart after a night of sleep. After this delay, half of the subjects gained insight into the hidden task structure ("solvers," S), whereas the other half did not ("nonsolvers," NS). Already at training, solvers and nonsolvers differed in their cerebral responses associated with implicit learning. In future solvers, responses were observed in the superior frontal sulcus, posterior parietal cortex, and the insula, three areas mediating controlled processes and supporting early learning and novice performance. In contrast, implicit learning was related to significant responses in the hippocampus in nonsolvers. Moreover, the hippocampus was functionally coupled with the basal ganglia in nonsolvers and with the superior frontal sulcus in solvers, thus potentially biasing participants' strategy towards implicit or controlled processes of memory encoding, respectively. Furthermore, in solvers but not in nonsolvers, response patterns were further transformed overnight, with enhanced responses in ventral medial prefrontal cortex, an area previously implicated in the consolidation of declarative memory. During retest in solvers, before they gain insight into the hidden rule, significant responses were observed in the same medial prefrontal area. After insight, a distributed set of parietal and frontal areas is recruited among which information concerning the hidden rule can be shared in a so-called global workspace. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional neuroimaging in sleep, sleep deprivation, and sleep disorders.
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg

in Chokroverty, Sudhansu; Montagna, Pasquale (Eds.) Handbook of Clinical Neurology, Sleep Disorders, Part I (2011)

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See detailSpontaneous neural activity during human non-rapid eye movement sleep.
Mascetti, Laura ULg; Foret, Ariane ULg; Shaffii, Anahita ULg et al

in Progress in Brain Research (2011), 193

Recent neuroimaging studies characterized the neural correlates of slow waves and spindles during human non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. They showed that significant activity was consistently ... [more ▼]

Recent neuroimaging studies characterized the neural correlates of slow waves and spindles during human non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. They showed that significant activity was consistently associated with slow (> 140 muV) and delta waves (75-140 muV) during NREM sleep in several cortical areas including inferior frontal, medial prefrontal, precuneus, and posterior cingulate cortices. Unexpectedly, slow waves were also associated with transient responses in the pontine tegmentum and in the cerebellum. On the other hand, spindles were associated with a transient activity in the thalami, paralimbic areas (anterior cingulate and insular cortices), and superior temporal gyri. Moreover, slow spindles (11-13 Hz) were associated with increased activity in the superior frontal gyrus. In contrast, fast spindles (13-15 Hz) recruited a set of cortical regions involved in sensorimotor processing, as well as the mesial frontal cortex and hippocampus. These findings indicate that human NREM sleep is an active state during which brain activity is temporally organized by spontaneous oscillations (spindles and slow oscillation) in a regionally specific manner. The functional significance of these NREM sleep oscillations is currently interpreted in terms of synaptic homeostasis and memory consolidation. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Ellenbogen, Jeffrey; Foulkes, David et al

in Encyclopaedia Britannica (2011)

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See detailNeuroimaging Insights into the Dreaming Brain
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel et al

in Dreams and Dreaming (2010)

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See detailWorking memory load affects chronotype- and time-of-day dependent cerebral activity modulations
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Leclercq, Yves ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2010), 19(Suppl. 2),

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See detailFunctional Neuroimaging Insights into the Physiology of Human Sleep
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

in Sleep (2010), 33(12), 1589-1603

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See detailSpontaneous brain rhythms predict sleep stability in the face of noise
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; McKinney, Scott; Buxton, Orfeu et al

in Current Biology (2010)

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See detailSleep: Implications for Theories of Dreaming and Consciousness
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, Manuel; Cologan, Victor ULg et al

in Banks, William (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Consciousness (2009)

This article discusses the relationships between sleep and consciousness.

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See detailCorrélats cérébraux du rêve
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg et al

in Médecine du Sommeil (2009), 6(2), 44-51

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See detailSome facts about sleep relevant for Landau-Kleffner syndrome.
Mascetti, Laura ULg; Foret, Ariane ULg; Bonjean, Maxime et al

in Epilepsia (2009), 50 Suppl 7

Our understanding of the neural mechanisms of non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) is steadily increasing. Given the intriguing activation of paroxysmal activity during NREM sleep in patients with Landau ... [more ▼]

Our understanding of the neural mechanisms of non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) is steadily increasing. Given the intriguing activation of paroxysmal activity during NREM sleep in patients with Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS), a thorough characterization of commonalities and differences between the neural correlates of LKS paroxysms and normal sleep oscillations might provide useful information on the neural underpinning of this disorder. Especially, given the suspected role of sleep in brain plasticity, this type of information is needed to assess the link between cognitive deterioration and electroencephalography (EEG) paroxysms during sleep. [less ▲]

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See detailRejection of pulse related artefact (PRA) from continuous electroencephalographic (EEG) time series recorded during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using constraint independent component analysis (cICA).
Leclercq, Yves ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2009), 44(3), 679-91

Rejection of the pulse related artefact (PRA) from electroencephalographic (EEG) time series recorded simultaneously with fMRI data is difficult, particularly during NREM sleep because of the similarities ... [more ▼]

Rejection of the pulse related artefact (PRA) from electroencephalographic (EEG) time series recorded simultaneously with fMRI data is difficult, particularly during NREM sleep because of the similarities between sleep slow waves and PRA, in both temporal and frequency domains and the need to work with non-averaged data. Here we introduce an algorithm based on constrained independent component analysis (cICA) for PRA removal. This method has several advantages: (1) automatic detection of the components corresponding to the PRA; (2) stability of the solution and (3) computational treatability. Using multichannel EEG recordings obtained in a 3 T MR scanner, with and without concomitant fMRI acquisition, we provide evidence for the sensitivity and specificity of the method in rejecting PRA in various sleep and waking conditions. [less ▲]

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