References of "Danchin, A"
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See detailSurvival in the cold: proteome analysis of the psychrophilic marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125
Wilmes, B.; Glagla, S.; Albrecht, D. et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailCoping with cold: The genome of the versatile marine Antarctica bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125
Medigue, C.; Krin, E.; Pascal, G. et al

in Genome Research (2005), 15(10), 1325-1335

A considerable fraction of life develops in the sea at temperatures lower than 15 degrees C. Little is known about the adaptive features selected under those conditions. We present the analysis of the ... [more ▼]

A considerable fraction of life develops in the sea at temperatures lower than 15 degrees C. Little is known about the adaptive features selected under those conditions. We present the analysis of the genome Sequence of the fast growing Antarctica bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125. We find that it copes with the increased Solubility of oxygen at low temperature by multiplying dioxygen scavenging while deleting whole pathways producing reactive oxygen species. Dioxygen-consuming lipid desaturases achieve both protection against oxygen and synthesis of lipids making the membrane fluid. A remarkable strategy for avoidance of reactive oxygen species generation is developed by A haloplanktis, with elimination of the ubiquitous molybdopterin-dependent metabolism. The A haloplanktis proteome reveals a concerted amino acid usage bias specific to psychrophiles, consistently appearing apt to accommodate asparagine, a residue prone to make proteins age. Adding to its originality, A haloplanktis further differs from its marine Counterparts with recruitment of a plasmid origin of replication for its second chromosome. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Structural And Functional Organization Of H-Ns-Like Proteins Is Evolutionarily Conserved In Gram-Negative Bacteria
Bertin, P.; Benhabiles, N.; Krin, E. et al

in Molecular Microbiology (1999), 31(1), 319-29

The structural gene of the H-NS protein, a global regulator of bacterial metabolism, has been identified in the group of enterobacteria as well as in closely related bacteria, such as Erwinia chrysanthemi ... [more ▼]

The structural gene of the H-NS protein, a global regulator of bacterial metabolism, has been identified in the group of enterobacteria as well as in closely related bacteria, such as Erwinia chrysanthemi and Haemophilus influenzae. Isolated outside these groups, the BpH3 protein of Bordetella pertussis exhibits a low amino acid conservation with H-NS, particularly in the N-terminal domain. To obtain information on the structure, function and/or evolution of H-NS, we searched for other H-NS-related proteins in the latest databases. We found that HvrA, a trans-activator protein in Rhodobacter capsulatus, has a low but significant similarity with H-NS and H-NS-like proteins. This Gram-negative bacterium is phylogenetically distant from Escherichia coli. Using theoretical analysis (e.g. secondary structure prediction and DNA binding domain modelling) of the amino acid sequence of H-NS, StpA (an H-NS-like protein in E. coli), BpH3 and HvrA and by in vivo and in vitro experiments (e.g. complementation of various H-NS-related phenotypes and competitive gel shift assay), we present evidence that these proteins belong to the same class of DNA binding proteins. In silico analysis suggests that this family also includes SPB in R. sphaeroides, XrvA in Xanthomonas oryzae and VicH in Vibrio cholerae. These results demonstrate that proteins structurally and functionally related to H-NS are widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Complete Genome Sequence Of The Gram-Positive Bacterium Bacillus Subtilis
Kunst, F.; Ogasawara, N.; Moszer, I. et al

in Nature (1997), 390(6657), 249-256

Bacillus subtilis is the best-characterized member of the Gram-positive bacteria. Its genome of 4,214,810 base pairs comprises 4,100 protein-coding genes. Of these protein-coding genes, 53% are ... [more ▼]

Bacillus subtilis is the best-characterized member of the Gram-positive bacteria. Its genome of 4,214,810 base pairs comprises 4,100 protein-coding genes. Of these protein-coding genes, 53% are represented once, while a quarter of the genome corresponds to several gene families that have been greatly expanded by gene duplication, the largest family containing 77 putative ATP-binding transport proteins. In addition, a large proportion of the genetic capacity is devoted to the utilization of a variety of carbon sources, including many plant-derived molecules. The identification of five signal peptidase genes, as well as several genes for components of the secretion apparatus, is important given the capacity of Bacillus strains to secrete large amounts of industrially important enzymes. Many of the genes are involved in the synthesis of secondary metabolites, including antibiotics, that are more typically associated with Streptomyces species. The genome contains at least ten prophages or remnants of prophages, indicating that bacteriophage infection has played an important evolutionary role in horizontal gene transfer, in particular in the propagation of bacterial pathogenesis. [less ▲]

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