References of "Damas, Jacques"
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See detailChemical and biological investigations of a toxic plant from Central Africa, Magnistipula butayei subsp montana
Karangwa, Charles; Esters, Virginie ULg; Frederich, Michel et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (2006), 103(3), 433-438

Magnistipida butayei subsp. montana (Chrysobalanaceae) is known, in the Great Lakes Region, to possess toxicological properties. In this paper, we investigated the acute toxicity (dose levels 50-1600 mg ... [more ▼]

Magnistipida butayei subsp. montana (Chrysobalanaceae) is known, in the Great Lakes Region, to possess toxicological properties. In this paper, we investigated the acute toxicity (dose levels 50-1600 mg/kg) of its aqueous extract, administered orally to adult Wistar rats. This study demonstrated that the freeze-dried aqueous extract (5%, w/w) possesses high toxicity. The extract caused hypothermia, neurological disorders, including extensor reflex of maximal convulsive induced-seizures at about 2h after the administered dose, and death occurred (LD50 = 370 mg/kg) in a dose dependent manner. Blood parameter evaluation revealed slight variations, but these might not have clinical relevance. Histological examination of internal organs (lungs, liver, heart and kidneys) did not reveal any abnormality in the treated group compared to the control. Therefore, it can be concluded that Magnistipida butayei subsp. montana aqueous extract, given orally, is toxic and that its target is the central nervous system. General phytochemical screening revealed that the plant did not contain significant amounts of products known to be toxic, such as alkaloids or cardioactive glycosides, but only catechic tannins, amino acids, saponins and other aphrogen principles in the three parts of the species (fruit, leave and bark). (c) 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes insulin release kinins in rats?
Damas, Jacques ULg; Garbacki, Nancy ULg; Lefebvre, P. J.

in European Journal of Pharmacology (2005), 525(1-3), 154-160

Rat uterus maintained in situ was used as a bioassay of kinins possibly released in vivo by hyperglycaemia or insulin. Intravenous injections of bradykinin induced contractions of rat uterus which were ... [more ▼]

Rat uterus maintained in situ was used as a bioassay of kinins possibly released in vivo by hyperglycaemia or insulin. Intravenous injections of bradykinin induced contractions of rat uterus which were suppressed by HOE 140, a bradykinin B-2 receptor antagonist. Des-Arg(9)-bradykinin, a kinin B-1 receptor agonist, did not elicit any response. After propranolol, the effects of bradykinin were enhanced and dose-dependent. This potentiation did not appear in adrenalectomized rats. Captopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, largely increased the effects of bradykinin. In animals pretreated with propranolol, captopril and atosiban, an oxytocin antagonist, intravenous infusion of glucose induced hyperglycaemia and after a delay increased the uterine contractile activity. This contractile effect of glucose was abolished by HOE 140. Infusion of insulin with glucose induced contractions of the uterus. These responses did not appear or were suppressed by HOE 140 or by soya bean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI), a plasma kallikrein inhibitor. These results are direct evidence that insulin induces a release of kinins. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailProanthocyanidins, from Ribes Nigrum Leaves, Reduce Endothelial Adhesion Molecules Icam-1 and Vcam-1
Garbacki, Nancy ULg; Kinet, Marie; Nusgens, Betty ULg et al

in Journal of Inflammation (London, England) (2005), 2

BACKGROUND: The effects of proanthocyanidins (PACs), isolated from blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum L.) leaves, on neutrophil accumulation during inflammatory processes were investigated in vivo and in vitro ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The effects of proanthocyanidins (PACs), isolated from blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum L.) leaves, on neutrophil accumulation during inflammatory processes were investigated in vivo and in vitro. METHODS: In vivo studies were performed using carrageenin-induced pleurisy in rats pre-treated with PACs. Exudate volume and PMNs accumulation were measured. Leukocyte cell adhesion molecules (LFA-1, Mac-1 and VLA-4) mobilization in circulating granulocytes were analysed by flow cytometry and endothelial cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) were detected by immunohistochemistry on lung sections. In vitro studies were conducted on endothelial LT2 cells, stimulated with TNF-alpha, to evaluate ICAM-1, IL-8 and VEGF mRNA expression upon PACs treatment. Data sets were examined by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by a Scheffe post-hoc test. RESULTS: Pretreatment of the animals with PACs (10, 30 and 60 mg/kg) inhibited dose-dependently carrageenin-induced pleurisy in rats by reducing pleural exudate formation and PMNs infliltration. Leukocyte cell adhesion molecules mobilization was not down-regulated on granulocytes by PACs. Immunohistochemistry on lung sections showed a decreased production of endothelial cell adhesion molecules. In vitro experiments demonstrated that PACs were able to significantly inhibit ICAM-1 but not IL-8 and VEGF165 mRNA expression. Moreover, VEGF121 mRNA expression was dose-dependently enhanced. CONCLUSION: This study provides evidence to support the anti-inflammatory activity of proanthocyanidins is related to an inhibition of leukocyte infiltration which can be explained at least in part by a down-regulation of endothelial adhesion molecules, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 and that these compounds are capable of modulating TNF-alpha-induced VEGF transcription. [less ▲]

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See detailInhibitory Effects of Proanthocyanidins from Ribes Nigrum Leaves on Carrageenin Acute Inflammatory Reactions Induced in Rats
Garbacki, Nancy ULg; Tits, Monique ULg; Angenot, Luc ULg et al

in BMC Pharmacology (2004), 4(1), 1-9

BACKGROUND: The anti-inflammatory effects of proanthocyanidins (PACs), isolated from blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum L.) leaves, were analysed using carrageenin-induced paw oedema and carrageenin-induced ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The anti-inflammatory effects of proanthocyanidins (PACs), isolated from blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum L.) leaves, were analysed using carrageenin-induced paw oedema and carrageenin-induced pleurisy in rats. RESULTS: Pretreatment of the animals with PACs (10, 30, 60 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced paw oedema induced by carrageenin in a dose and time-dependent manner. PACs also inhibited dose-dependently carrageenin-induced pleurisy in rats. They reduced (A) lung injury, (B) pleural exudate formation, (C) polymorphonuclear cell infiltration, (D) pleural exudate levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and CINC-1 but did not affect IL-6 and IL-10 levels. They reduced (E) pleural exudate levels of nitrite/nitrate (NOx). In indomethacin treated rats, the volume of pleural exudate was low, its content in leukocytes and its contents in TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and IL-10 but not in NOx were reduced. These data suggest that the anti-inflammatory properties of PACs are achieved through a different pattern from those of indomethacin. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the main mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effect of PACs mainly lies in an interference with the migration of the leukocytes. Moreover, PACs inhibited in vivo nitric oxide release. [less ▲]

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See detailLaminarin in the dietary fibre concept
Deville, Christelle ULg; Damas, Jacques ULg; Forget, Pierre et al

in Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture (2004), 84(9), 1030-1038

Dietary fibres consist of edible plant polysaccharides that are resistant to digestion and absorption in the human small intestine but undergo complete or partial fermentation in the colon. Seaweeds ... [more ▼]

Dietary fibres consist of edible plant polysaccharides that are resistant to digestion and absorption in the human small intestine but undergo complete or partial fermentation in the colon. Seaweeds, notably Laminaria spp, are particularly rich in polysaccharides resistant to hydrolysis in the upper gastrointestinal tract and are, in consequence, considered as dietary fibres. Most of the carbohydrates from Laminaria spp are thought to be indigestible by humans. The main storage polysaccharide of these algae is laminarin, a beta-polymer of glucose. The aims of this work were, on the one hand, to compare various methods of extraction of laminarin by partial characterisation of the product obtained and, on the other hand, to study the fate of this polysaccharide and its effects in the gastrointestinal tract in order to determine its potential as a dietary fibre in human nutrition. Among four methods tested to extract laminarin, the best appeared to be a hot HCl-based method. Human digestive enzymes did not hydrolyse laminarin, so this polysaccharide can be considered as a dietary fibre. After ingestion by rats, this polysaccharide was not found in faeces of these animals. It did not increase the intestinal transit and stool output in vivo, but it increased the contractile response of the stomach to acetylcholine in vitro. (C) 2004 Society of Chemical Industry. [less ▲]

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See detailThe kallikrein-kinin system, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and insulin sensitivity
Damas, Jacques ULg; Garbacki, Nancy ULg; Lefèbvre, P. J.

in Diabetes/Metabolism Research & Reviews (2004), 20(4, Jul-Aug), 288-297

The therapeutic use of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, at a large scale, in arterial hypertension has showed that these molecules can exert, beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and ... [more ▼]

The therapeutic use of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, at a large scale, in arterial hypertension has showed that these molecules can exert, beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and may reduce the occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. One hypothesis explaining these effects of ACE inhibitors may relate to their capacity to interfere with bradykinin (BK) metabolism and action. BK may participate in the regulation of substrate utilization by, several tissues by improving blood flow and substrate delivery to the tissues and also by promoting translocation of glucose transporters. Moreover, BK has been shown to increase phosphorylation of insulin receptor and its cell substrates. BK also appears to improve the release of insulin. Furthermore, insulin may activate the kallikrein-kinin system, which consequently may increase its metabolic effects. However, in experimental diabetes mellitus, BK can participate to the inflammatory reaction leading to Langerhans islets destruction. In diabetes, whereas tissue kallikrein mRNA levels were reduced in several organs, an overexpression of kinin receptors, an increase in plasma levels of kininogens and kallikrein and an activation of the kinin system have all been reported. Lastly, kinins may be involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Reduction of kinin metabolism by ACE inhibitors might be involved in the beneficial effects exerted by these compounds in diabetic kidney functions. Copyright (C) 2004 John Wiley Sons, Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailDesign, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of pyridinic analogues of nimesulide as cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors
Julémont, F.; de Leval, X.; Michaux, C. et al

in Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2004), 47

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See detailSome effects of proanthocyanidins isolated from Ribes nigrum on the cardiovascular system in the rat.
Garbacki, Nancy ULg; Damas, Jacques ULg

in Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology (2004), 18

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See detailActivation and inactivation of bradykinin in rats.
Damas, Jacques ULg; Garbacki, Nancy ULg

in Pflügers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology (2003), 446

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See detailAnti-inflammatory effect of natural proanthocyanidins: pharmacological evaluation on in vivo models.
Garbacki, Nancy ULg; Tits, Monique ULg; Damas, Jacques ULg

in Pflügers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology (2003), 446

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See detailNew pyridobenzodiazepine derivatives: Modifications of the basic side chain differentially modulate binding to dopamine (D-4.2, D-2L) and serotonin (5-HT2A) receptors
Liégeois, Jean-François ULg; Eyrolles, L.; Ellenbroek, B. A. et al

in Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2002), 45(23), 5136-5149

A series of new pyridobenzodiazepines with variation of the basic side chain were synthesized and evaluated for their binding to D-4.2, D-2L, and 5-HT2A receptors in comparison with clozapine, haloperidol ... [more ▼]

A series of new pyridobenzodiazepines with variation of the basic side chain were synthesized and evaluated for their binding to D-4.2, D-2L, and 5-HT2A receptors in comparison with clozapine, haloperidol, and two parent compounds previously described, 8-chloro-6-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-11H-pyrido[2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepine (8) and 8-methyl-6-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-11H-pyrido[2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepine (9). In the piperazine series, replacing the N-methyl group by a N-phenyl moiety (15-17, 30-32) provided a dramatic decrease of affinity for all receptors (K-i > 1000 nM). A N-cyclohexyl group (20, 35) restored some affinity. Compounds with a N-benzyl (18, 33) or N-phenethyl side chain (19, 34) had significant affinities at D-4.2 and 5-HT2A receptors. Homologation of the piperazine nucleus (29, 44) led to a significant decrease of the affinity at all receptors investigated. In the 4-aminopiperidine series, N-methyl derivatives (21, 36) possessed less affinity in comparison with the N-metbylpiperazine analogues (8, 9) while the N-benzyl congeners (22, 37) showed similar affinities. The rigidification of piperidine nucleus as obtained in azabicyclo [3.2.1] octane derivatives (23, 38) involved a slight reduction of the affinity at D-4.2 and 5-HT2A receptors while the affinity at D-2L receptors was dramatically increased. The introduction of N-substituted aminoalkylamines to replace N-methylpiperazine generally led to a significant decrease in the affinity for D-4.2 receptors but some of these molecules (24, 25, 41) presented a significant 5-HT2A binding affinity. The presence of a more flexible side chain induced an increased conformational freedom. Consequently, the preferential position of the distal nitrogen or its basicity in piperazine derivatives was greatly modified. 19 with a high D-4.2 and 5-HT2A affinity (K-i = 40 and 103 nM, respectively) did not induce cataleptic phenomenon in the paw test in rats but significantly reduced the immobility time in Porsolt's test in mice suggesting antidepressant properties. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of prodelphinidins isolated from Ribes nigrum on chondrocyte metabolism and COX activity
Garbacki, Nancy ULg; Angenot, Luc ULg; Bassleer, C. et al

in Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology (2002), 365(6), 434-441

Articular diseases. such as osteoarthritis, is the clinical expression of the loss of cartilage function. COX inhibitors are widely used in the treatment of such pathologies for their beneficial effects ... [more ▼]

Articular diseases. such as osteoarthritis, is the clinical expression of the loss of cartilage function. COX inhibitors are widely used in the treatment of such pathologies for their beneficial effects on inflammation but often produce a negative activity on cartilage synthesis. In this study, we determined the effect of different prodelphinidins, the major compounds isolated from Ribes nigrum leaves, on the proteoglycans (PGs), type II collagen (coll. II) and prostaglandin E-2 (PGE(2)) production by differentiated human chondrocytes cultivated in long term (12 days) and in clusters as well as their inhibition potential on COX-1 and COX-2 in vitro. Gallocatechin trimer (GC-GC-GC) showed the higher stimulation of PGs and coll. II production (1 mug ml(-1)) and the synthesis of PGE(2) was significantly reduced by gallocatechin dimer (GC-GC), gallocatechin-epigallocatechin (GC-EGC) and GC-GC-GC at 10 and 100 mug ml(-1). The inhibition of PGE(2) synthesis was confirmed by the in vitro test on purified COX enzymes, showing the selectivity of prodelphinidins on COX-2. However, the prodelphinidins had no effects on COX activity in the whole blood assay. Our studies suggest that the prodelphinidins fractions from R. nigrum may be useful as an additive agent in the prevention of osteoarthritis. [less ▲]

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See detailMinimal effects of JL 13, a pyridobenzoxazepine derivative with an antipsychotic potential, on circulating prolactin levels in male rats
Liégeois, Jean-François ULg; Bruhwyler, J.; Hendrick, J. C. et al

in Neuroscience Letters (2002), 319(1), 49-52

Antipsychotic therapy is frequently associated with several side effects such as hyperprolactinemia. The influence of a putative antipsychotic JL 13 on prolactin release was assessed after intraperitoneal ... [more ▼]

Antipsychotic therapy is frequently associated with several side effects such as hyperprolactinemia. The influence of a putative antipsychotic JL 13 on prolactin release was assessed after intraperitoneal injection in gentled male rats in comparison with clozapine and haloperidol. A total of 30 or 150 min after administration, whole blood was collected for preparing serum samples. Prolactin was quantified by radioimmunoassay method. At 30 min, JL 13 like clozapine, increased prolactin concentration only at the higher dose (30 mg/kg) while haloperidol at both tested doses induced a dramatic increase of prolactin concentration. At 150 min after injection, only haloperidol (0.3 mg/kg) significantly increased serum prolactin level. This minimal effect on prolactinemia reinforces the similarity of clozapine and JL 13 regarding the atypical antipsychotic profile. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailRelaxant effect of K+ATP channel openers on the uterine smooth muscle: pharmacological in vitro models
De Tullio, Pascal ULg; Boverie, S.; Dewalque, Daniel ULg et al

in Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology (2002)

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See detailLe controle du reseau vasculaire cutane
Damas, Jacques ULg; Garbacki, Nancy ULg; Liégeois, Jean-François ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2001), 56(12), 846-9

In man, three kinds of sympathetic neurons reach the skin. Some cholinergic neurons stimulate the sweat glands, they are excited by temperature-regulating centers. Adrenergic neurons release noradrenaline ... [more ▼]

In man, three kinds of sympathetic neurons reach the skin. Some cholinergic neurons stimulate the sweat glands, they are excited by temperature-regulating centers. Adrenergic neurons release noradrenaline and ATP to reduce cutaneous blood flow while cholinergic neurons release acetylcholine and a co-transmitter to dilate skin blood vessels. The excitation of both latter types of nerve cells depends on influences from temperature-regulating centers, baroreceptors and exercise. Moreover, in cutaneous blood vessels, a synthesis of NO is enhanced by an increase of body temperature and overall by direct heating of the skin. Burns are associated with axon reflexes and release of inflammatory mediators. The involvement of these various influences is described. [less ▲]

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See detailElectrooxidation Potential as a Tool in the Early Screening for New Safer Clozapine-Like Analogues
Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange ULg; Kauffmann, J. M.; Petit, C. et al

in Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2001), 44(5), 769-76

The chemical modification of clozapine (1) has permitted the finding of new analogues, e.g., olanzapine (2), quetiapine (3), 5-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-8-chloropyrido[2,3-b][1,5]benzoxazepine fumarate (9 ... [more ▼]

The chemical modification of clozapine (1) has permitted the finding of new analogues, e.g., olanzapine (2), quetiapine (3), 5-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-8-chloropyrido[2,3-b][1,5]benzoxazepine fumarate (9), with a clinical or psychopharmacological profile similar to that of clozapine. However, when developing new derivatives, the designers are discouraged by the development of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis. Different researchers have raised the role played by the oxidizability of the molecule in such a deleterious effect. In the present paper, we examined the oxidation profile (direct scavenging abilities, efficacy in inhibiting lipid peroxidation, and electrooxidation potential) of newly developed methoxy and trifluoromethylsulfonyloxy analogues related to clozapine, some of them being described as putative antipsychotic. The oxazepine derivative 7, unlike the other diazepine derivatives (6, 10--12), was not readily oxidized. Using a statistical predictive model for hematotoxicity previously described, 7 was found in the cluster of potentially nontoxic compounds while diazepine derivatives 6 and 10-12 were classified as potentially toxic compounds. Among these original compounds, 7, which presents a preclinical clozapine-like profile and a low sensitivity to oxidation, could be a promising antipsychotic candidate with low side effects. Considering the tricyclic derivatives examined so far, some elements of structure-oxidation relationship (SOR) might be pointed out. Regarding the nature of the tricyclic ring substituent, from the most to the least sensitive to oxidation, the sequence was as follows: HO > Cl > CH(3)O > CF(3)SO(2)O. The nature of the tricyclic ring influenced also the sensitivity to oxidation; the diazepine moiety appeared to be the most reactive ring compared to oxa- and thiazepine congeners. These parameters could be advantageously integrated in the early design of new safer clozapine-like analogues. [less ▲]

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See detailAbout the relationship between the kallikrein-kinin system and insulin
Damas, Jacques ULg; Liégeois, Jean-François ULg

in Current Topics in Peptide and Protein Research (2001), 4

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