References of "DAMAS, François"
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See detailQUELLE EST LA PLACE DE L’HUMAIN AU SEIN DES RECOMMANDATIONS, DES CONCERTATIONS ONCOLOGIQUES
BARTHELEMY, Nicole ULg; BOGA, Deniz ULg; PRINCEN, Fabienne ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69(Supp 1), 9-12

Le patient atteint de cancer bénéficie à l’heure actuelle d’une médecine très technique, de plus en plus ciblée et individualisée. Et l’Homme dans tout cela ? Divers outils ont été développés afin d’aider ... [more ▼]

Le patient atteint de cancer bénéficie à l’heure actuelle d’une médecine très technique, de plus en plus ciblée et individualisée. Et l’Homme dans tout cela ? Divers outils ont été développés afin d’aider les médecins et l’ensemble des soignants à concilier la médecine contemporaine et les droits fondamentaux du patient. Parmi ceux-ci, on trouve les Concertations Oncologiques Multidisciplinaires (COM) ainsi que les recommandations de traitement publiées par les socié - tés scientifiques nationales ou internationales. La prise en charge des patients doit être interdisciplinaire et basée sur une médecine factuelle. Ce processus de prise de décisions parta - gée doit, au final, être en accord avec les souhaits du patient. Cette approche doit lui permettre de conserver son autonomie et d’être l’acteur principal dans les prises de décision. [less ▲]

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See detailEUTHANASIE ET DEMENCE
Barthélemy, Nicole ULg; DAMAS, François ULg; ALLEPAERTS, Sophie ULg et al

Conference (2013, November 13)

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See detailComparison of the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness and Glasgow Liege Scale/Glasgow Coma Scale in an Intensive Care Unit Population.
Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; LEDOUX, Didier ULg; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg et al

in Neurocritical Care (2011), 15(3), 447-53

BACKGROUND: The Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) has been proposed as an alternative for the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS)/Glasgow Liege Scale (GLS) in the evaluation of consciousness in severely brain ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) has been proposed as an alternative for the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS)/Glasgow Liege Scale (GLS) in the evaluation of consciousness in severely brain-damaged patients. We compared the FOUR and GLS/GCS in intensive care unit patients who were admitted in a comatose state. METHODS: FOUR and GLS evaluations were performed in randomized order in 176 acutely (<1 month) brain-damaged patients. GLS scores were transformed in GCS scores by removing the GLS brainstem component. Inter-rater agreement was assessed in 20% of the studied population (N = 35). A logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, and etiology was performed to assess the link between the studied scores and the outcome 3 months after injury (N = 136). RESULTS: GLS/GCS verbal component was scored 1 in 146 patients, among these 131 were intubated. We found that the inter-rater reliability was good for the FOUR score, the GLS/GCS. FOUR, GLS/GCS total scores predicted functional outcome with and without adjustment for age and etiology. 71 patients were considered as being in a vegetative/unresponsive state based on the GLS/GCS. The FOUR score identified 8 of these 71 patients as being minimally conscious given that these patients showed visual pursuit. CONCLUSIONS: The FOUR score is a valid tool with good inter-rater reliability that is comparable to the GLS/GCS in predicting outcome. It offers the advantage to be performable in intubated patients and to identify non-verbal signs of consciousness by assessing visual pursuit, and hence minimal signs of consciousness (11% in this study), not assessed by GLS/GCS scales. [less ▲]

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See detailEnd of life care in the operating room for non-heart-beating donors: organization at the University Hospital of Liege.
JORIS, Jean ULg; KABA, Abdourahmane ULg; LAUWICK, Séverine ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2011), 43(9), 3441-4

Non-heart-beating (NHB) organ donation has become an alternative source to increase organ supply for transplantation. A NHB donation program was implemented in our institution in 2002. As in many ... [more ▼]

Non-heart-beating (NHB) organ donation has become an alternative source to increase organ supply for transplantation. A NHB donation program was implemented in our institution in 2002. As in many institutions the end of life care of the NHB donor (NHBD) is terminated in the operating room (OR) to reduce warm ischemia time. Herein we have described the organization of end of life care for these patients in our institution, including the problems addressed, the solution proposed, and the remaining issues. Emphasis is given to our protocol elaborated with the different contributors of the chain of the NHB donation program. This protocol specifies the information mandatory in the medical records, the end of life care procedure, the determination of death, and the issue of organ preservation measures before NHBD death. The persisting malaise associated with NHB donation reported by OR nurses is finally documented using an anonymous questionnaire. [less ▲]

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See detailContribution of donors after cardiac death to the deceased donor pool: 2002 to 2009 university of liege experience.
Ledinh, H.; Meurisse, Nicolas ULg; Delbouille, Michèle ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2010), 42(10), 4369-72

OBJECTIVE: In this study, we have evaluated the organ procurement and transplantation activity from donors after cardiac death (DCD) at our institution over an 8-year period. Our aim was to determine ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: In this study, we have evaluated the organ procurement and transplantation activity from donors after cardiac death (DCD) at our institution over an 8-year period. Our aim was to determine whether this program influenced transplantation programs, or donation after brain death (DBD) activity. METHODS: We prospectively collected our procurement and transplantation statistics in a database for retrospective review. RESULTS: We observed an increasing trend in potential and actual DCD number. The mean conversion rate turning potential into effective donors was 58.1%. DCD accounted for 16.6% of the deceased donor (DD) pool over 8 years. The mean age for effective DCD donors was 53.9 years (range, 3-79). Among the effective donors, 63.3% (n = 31) came from the transplant center and 36.7% (n = 18) were referred from collaborative hospitals. All donors were Maastricht III category. The number of kidney and liver transplants using DCD sources tended to increase. DCD kidney transplants represented 10.8% of the DD kidney pool and DCD liver transplants made up 13.9% of the DD liver pool over 8 years. The DBD program activity increased in the same time period. In 2009, 17 DCD and 33 DBD procurements were performed in a region with a little >1 million inhabitants. CONCLUSION: The establishment of a DCD program in our institution enlarged the donor pool and did not compromise the development of the DBD program. In our experience, DCD are a valuable source for abdominal organ transplantation. [less ▲]

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See detailIntracranial subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia: case report and review of the literature
Machurot, P. Y.; Vergnion, M.; Fraipont, V. et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2010), 61(2), 63-66

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See detailLiver transplantation from controlled donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors: a single center experience
Detry, Olivier ULg; Veys, Caroline; Seydel, Benoît ULg et al

in Liver Transplantation (2009, July), 15(7), 180-181

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See detailLiver transplant donation after cardiac death : experience at the University of Liège
Detry, Olivier ULg; Seydel, Benoît ULg; Delbouille, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2009), 41(2), 582-4

Aim: Donation after cardiac death (DCD) has been proposed to partly overcome the organ donor shortage. In liver transplantation, the additional warm ischemia linked to DCD procurement may promote higher ... [more ▼]

Aim: Donation after cardiac death (DCD) has been proposed to partly overcome the organ donor shortage. In liver transplantation, the additional warm ischemia linked to DCD procurement may promote higher rate of primary non-function and ischemic type biliary lesions. In this study we reviewed the results of DCD liver transplantation at the University of Liège. Patients and Methods: From 2003 to 2007, 13 controlled DCD liver transplantations were consecutively performed. The records of all donors and recipients were retrospectively reviewed, particularly evaluating the outcome and the occurrence of biliary complications. Mean follow-up was 25 months. Results: Mean donor age was 51 years and their mean intensive care stay was 5.4 days. Mean time between ventilation arrest and cardiac arrest was 9.3 min. Mean time between cardiac arrest and arterial flush was 7.7 min. No touch period was 2 to 5 min. Mean graft cold ischemia was 295 min and mean suture warm ischemia was 38 min. Postoperatively there was no primary non-function. Mean peak transaminase was 2,546 UI/ml. Patient and graft survival was 100% at one year. Two patients (15%) developed graft main bile duct stenosis and underwent endoscopic management. No patient developed symptomatic intrahepatic bile duct strictures or needed retransplantation in the follow-up. Conclusions: The experience of the transplantation department of the University of Liege confirms that controlled DCD donors may be a valuable source of transplantable liver grafts, in case of short procurement warm ischemia and short transplant cold ischemia. [less ▲]

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See detailResults of liver transplantation from controlled donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors: a single center experience
Detry, Olivier ULg; Seydel, Benoît ULg; Veys, C. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2009, January), 72(1), 25

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See detailLocked-in syndrome in children: report of five cases and review of the literature
Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Schnakers, C.; Damas, François ULg et al

in Pediatric Neurology (2009), 41

The locked-in syndrome is a rare neurologic disorder defined by (1) the presence of sustained eye opening; (2) preserved awareness; (3) aphonia or hypophonia; (4) quadriplegia or quadriparesis; and (5) a ... [more ▼]

The locked-in syndrome is a rare neurologic disorder defined by (1) the presence of sustained eye opening; (2) preserved awareness; (3) aphonia or hypophonia; (4) quadriplegia or quadriparesis; and (5) a primary mode of communication that uses vertical or lateral eye movement or blinking. Five cases are reported here, and previous literature is reviewed. According to the literature, the most common etiology of locked-in syndrome in children is ventral pontine stroke, most frequently caused by a vertebrobasilar artery thrombosis or occlusion. In terms of prognosis, 35% of pediatric locked-in syndrome patients experienced some motor recovery, 26% had good recovery, 23% died, and 16% remained quadriplegic and anarthric. These findings raise important ethical considerations in terms of quality of life and end-of-life decisions in such challenging cases. [less ▲]

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See detailLe Locked-In Syndrome : la conscience emmurée
Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Pellas, F.; Schnakers, Caroline ULg et al

in Revue Neurologique (2008), 164

The Locked-In syndrome(LIS) is defined by: (i) the presence of sustained eye opening (bilateral ptosis should be ruled out as a complicating factor);(ii) preserved awareness; (iii) aphonia or hypophonia ... [more ▼]

The Locked-In syndrome(LIS) is defined by: (i) the presence of sustained eye opening (bilateral ptosis should be ruled out as a complicating factor);(ii) preserved awareness; (iii) aphonia or hypophonia; (iv) quadriplegia or quadriparesis; and (v) a primary mode of communication that uses vertical or lateral eye movement or blinking. Acute ventral pontine lesions are its most common cause. Following such brainstem lesions patients may remain comatose for sometime and then gradually awaken, remaining paralyzed and voiceless, superficially resembling the vegetative state. Background. – It has been shown that more than half of the time physicians fail to recognize early signs of awareness in LIS. Given appropriate medical care,life expectancy may be several decades but the chances of good motor recovery remain small. Eye-controlled computer technology now allows LIS patients to communicate and control their environment. Recent studies show that most LIS patients self-report meaningful quality of life and the demand for euthanasia is infrequent. Conclusion. – Patients suffering from LIS should not be denied the right to die – and to die with dignity –but also they should not be denied the right to live–and to live with dignity and the best possible pain and symptom management and revalidation. [less ▲]

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See detailA french validation study of the Coma Recovery Scaled-Revised (CRS-R)
Schnakers, Caroline ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg; Giacino, Joseph et al

in Brain Injury (2008), 22(10), 786-792

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See detailPrevalence of patent foramen ovale and MRI white matter lesions in migraine with aura
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Magis, Delphine ULg; Fumal, Arnaud ULg et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2007, June), 27(6), 577-578

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See detailCerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in severely brain injured patients: Differences between VS and MCS
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2005), 15(3-4, Jul-Sep), 283-289

We review cerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in minimally conscious state (MCS) and vegetative state (VS) patients. In contrast with limited brain activation found in VS patients, MCS ... [more ▼]

We review cerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in minimally conscious state (MCS) and vegetative state (VS) patients. In contrast with limited brain activation found in VS patients, MCS patients show activation similar to controls in response to auditory, emotional and noxious stimuli. Despite an apparent clinical similarity between MCS and VS patients, functional imaging data show striking differences in cortical segregation and integration between these two conditions. However, in the absence of a generally accepted neural correlate of consciousness as measured by functional neuroirnaging, clinical assessment remains the gold standard for the evaluation and management of severely brain damaged patients. [less ▲]

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See detailThe locked-in syndrome : what is it like to be conscious but paralyzed and voiceless?
Laureys, Steven ULg; Pellas, Frédéric; Van Eeckhout, Philippe et al

in Progress in Brain Research (2005), 150(Boundaries of Consciousness: Neurobiology and Neuropathology), 495-511

The locked-in syndrome (pseudocoma) describes patients who are awake and conscious but selectively deefferented, i.e., have no means of producing speech, limb or facial movements. Acute ventral pontine ... [more ▼]

The locked-in syndrome (pseudocoma) describes patients who are awake and conscious but selectively deefferented, i.e., have no means of producing speech, limb or facial movements. Acute ventral pontine lesions are its most common cause. People with such brainstem lesions often remain comatose for some days or weeks, needing artificial respiration and then gradually wake up, but remaining paralyzed and voiceless, superficially resembling patients in a vegetative state or akinetic mutism, In acute locked-in syndrome (LIS), eye-coded communication and evaluation of cognitive and emotional functioning is very limited because vigilance is fluctuating and eye movements may be inconsistent, very small, and easily exhausted. It has been shown that more than half of the time it is the family and not the physician who first realized that the patient was aware. Distressingly, recent studies reported that the diagnosis of LIS on average takes over 2.5 months. In some cases it took 4-6 years before aware and sensitive patients, locked in an immobile body, were recognized as being conscious. Once a LIS patient becomes medically stable, and given appropriate medical care, life expectancy increases to several decades. Even if the chances of good motor recovery are very limited, existing eye-controlled, computer-based communication technology currently allow the patient to control his environment, use a word processor coupled to a speech synthesizer, and access the worldwide net. Healthy individuals and medical professionals sometimes assume that the quality of life of an LIS patient is so poor that it is not worth living. On the contrary, chronic LIS patients typically self-report meaningful quality of life and their demand for euthanasia is surprisingly infrequent. Biased clinicians might provide less aggressive medical treatment and influence the family in inappropriate ways. It is important to stress that only the medically stabilized, informed LIS patient is competent to consent to or refuse life-sustaining treatment. Patients suffering from LIS should not be denied the right tot die - and to die with dignity - but also, and more importantly, and pain and symptom management. In our opinion, there is an urgent need for a renewed ethical and medicolegal framework for our care of locked-in patients. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact du Percussionaire® et de la kinésithérapie respiratoire conventionnelle après chirurgie cardiaque : étude randomisée contrôlée
Kellens, Isabelle ULg; Fraipont, V.; Weber, T. et al

in Réanimation (2003, December), 12(suppl 3), 243

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See detailEtudes par tomographie à émission de positons chez des patients en coma, en état végétatif ou de conscience minimale, en «locked-in syndrome» et en mort cérébrale
Laureys, Steven ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Berre, Jacques et al

in L'évaluation neurophysiologique des comas, de la mort encéphalique et des états végétatifs (2001)

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