References of "D'ORIO, Vincenzo"
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See detailCOMMENT JE TRAITE ... L’arrêt cardio-respiratoire extrahospitalier : la fenêtre du centraliste 112
STIPULANTE, Samuel ULg; ZANDONA, Régine; EL-FASSI, Mehdi ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (in press), 69

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See detailAIR VERSUS GROUND TRANSPORT OF PATIENTS WITH ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION: EXPERIENCE IN A RURAL-BASED HELICOPTER MEDICAL SERVICE
MOENS, Didier ULg; Stipulante, Samuel ULg; Donneau, Anne-Françoise ULg et al

in European Journal of Emergency Medicine (in press)

Aims Primary pre-hospital Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) interventions may play a role in timely reperfusion therapy for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We ... [more ▼]

Aims Primary pre-hospital Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) interventions may play a role in timely reperfusion therapy for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We designed a prospective study involving patients with acute myocardial infarction aimed at the evaluation of the potential benefit of such primary HEMS interventions as compared with classical EMS ground transport. Methods & results This prospective study was conducted from July 1, 2007 to June 15, 2012. Successive patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) eligible for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were included. Simulated ground-based access times were computed using a digital cartographic program, allowing the estimation of healthcare system delay from call to admission to the catheterisation laboratory. During the study period, 4485 patients benefited from HEMS activations. Of these patients, 342 (8%) suffering from STEMI were transferred for primary PCI. Median primary response time time was 11 min (IQR: 8 - 14 min) using the helicopter and 32 min (25 – 44 min) using road transport. Median transport time using HEMS was 12 min (9 – 15 min) and 50 min (36 – 56 min) by road. The median system delay using HEMS was 52 min (45 – 60 min), while this time was 110 min (95 – 126 min) by road. Finally, the system delay median gain was 60 min (47 – 72 min). Conclusions Using HEMS in a rural region allows STEMI patients to benefit from appropriate rescue care with similar delays as those seen in urban patients. [less ▲]

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See detailReliability and validity of a new French-language triage algorithm : the ELISA scale
JOBE, Jérôme ULg; Ghuysen, Alexandre ULg; GERARD, P et al

in Emergency Medicine Journal (2014), 31(2), 115-20

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See detailImplementation of the ALERT algorithm, a new dispatcher-assisted telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation protocol, in non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System (AMPDS) Emergency Medical Services centres.
STIPULANTE, Samuel ULg; Tubes, Rebecca; Fassi, Mehdi El et al

in Resuscitation (2014), 85(2), 177-181

Objectives: Early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a key factor in improving survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The ALERT (Algorithme Liegeois d'Encadrement a la ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a key factor in improving survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The ALERT (Algorithme Liegeois d'Encadrement a la Reanimation par Telephone) algorithm has the potential to help bystanders initiate CPR. This study evaluates the effectiveness of the implementation of this protocol in a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System area. Methods: We designed a before and after study based on a 3-month retrospective assessment of victims of OHCA in 2009, before the implementation of the ALERT protocol in Liege emergency medical communication centre (EMCC), and the prospective evaluation of the same 3 months in 2011, immediately after the implementation. Results: At the moment of the call, dispatchers were able to identify 233 OHCA in the first period and 235 in the second. Victims were predominantly male (59%, both periods), with mean ages of 64.1 and 63.9 years, respectively. In 2009, only 9.9% victims benefited from bystander CPR, this increased to 22.5% in 2011 (p<0.0002). The main reasons for protocol under-utilisation were: assistance not offered by the dispatcher (42,3%), caller physically remote from the victim (20.6%). Median time from call to first compression, defined here as no flow time, was 253sec in 2009 and 168sec in 2011 (NS). Ten victims were admitted to hospital after ROSC in 2009 and 13 in 2011 (p=0.09). Conclusion: From the beginning and despite its under-utilisation, the ALERT protocol significantly improved the number of patients in whom bystander CPR was attempted. [less ▲]

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See detailA fatal case of Perthes syndrome
JOBE, Jérôme ULg; Ghuysen, Alexandre ULg; Hartstein, Gary ULg et al

in Journal of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock (2013), 6(4), 296-297

Perthes syndrome, or traumatic asphyxia, is a clinical syndrome associating cervicofacial cyanosis with cutaneous petechial haemorrhages and subconjonctival bleeding resulting from severe sudden ... [more ▼]

Perthes syndrome, or traumatic asphyxia, is a clinical syndrome associating cervicofacial cyanosis with cutaneous petechial haemorrhages and subconjonctival bleeding resulting from severe sudden compressive chest trauma. Deep inspiration and a Valsalva maneuver just prior to rapid and severe chest compression, are responsible for the development of this syndrome. Current treatment is symptomatic: urgent relief of chest compression and cardiopulmonary resuscitation if needed. Outcome may be satisfactory depending on the duration and severity of compression. Prolonged thoracic compression may sometimes lead to cerebral anoxia, irreversible neurologic damage and death. We report a fatal case of Perthes syndrome resulting from an industrial accident. [less ▲]

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See detailProspective study of an advanced nurse triage for a target pathology at the admission in the emergency department
JOBE, Jérôme ULg; VANDERCLEYEN, C; Ghuysen, Alexandre ULg et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (2013), 68(6), 2

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See detailReliability and validity of a new french-language triage algorithm : the ELISA scale
JOBE, Jérôme ULg; Ghuysen, Alexandre ULg; GERARD, Paul et al

in Emergency Medicine Journal (2012)

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See detailArterial dP/dtmax accurately reflects left ventricular contractility during shock when adequate vascular filling is achieved
MORIMONT, Philippe ULg; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg; Desaive, Thomas ULg et al

in BMC Cardiovascular Disorders (2012), 12:13

Background: Peak first derivative of femoral artery pressure (arterial dP/dt max) derived from fluid-filled catheter remains questionable to assess left ventricular (LV) contractility during shock. The ... [more ▼]

Background: Peak first derivative of femoral artery pressure (arterial dP/dt max) derived from fluid-filled catheter remains questionable to assess left ventricular (LV) contractility during shock. The aim of this study was to test if arterial dP/dt maxis reliable for assessing LV contractility during various hemodynamic conditions such as endotoxin-induced shock and catecholamine infusion.Methods: Ventricular pressure-volume data obtained with a conductance catheter and invasive arterial pressure obtained with a fluid-filled catheter were continuously recorded in 6 anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated pigs. After a stabilization period, endotoxin was infused to induce shock. Catecholamines were transiently administrated during shock. Arterial dP/dt maxwas compared to end-systolic elastance (Ees), the gold standard method for assessing LV contractility.Results: Endotoxin-induced shock and catecholamine infusion lead to significant variations in LV contractility. Overall, significant correlation (r = 0.51; p < 0.001) but low agreement between the two methods were observed. However, a far better correlation with a good agreement were observed when positive-pressure ventilation induced an arterial pulse pressure variation (PPV) ≤ 11% (r = 0.77; p < 0.001).Conclusion: While arterial dP/dt maxand Ees were significantly correlated during various hemodynamic conditions, arterial dP/dt maxwas more accurate for assessing LV contractility when adequate vascular filling, defined as PPV ≤ 11%, was achieved. © 2012 Morimont et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive support for a better handoff: does it improve the quality of medical communication at shift change in an emergency department?
Gillet, Aline ULg; GHUYSEN, Alexandre ULg; BONHOMME, Suzanne ULg et al

in European Journal of Emergency Medicine (2012)

AIM: To improve the communication during shift handover in an emergency department. METHODS: We observed the handover process and analysed the discourse between physicians at shift change first, and then ... [more ▼]

AIM: To improve the communication during shift handover in an emergency department. METHODS: We observed the handover process and analysed the discourse between physicians at shift change first, and then we created two cognitive tools and tested their clinical impact on the field. We used different measures to evaluate this impact on the health care process including the frequency and type of information content communicated between physicians, duration of the handoff, physician self-evaluation of the quality of the handoff and a posthandover study of patient handling. RESULTS: Our results showed that the patient's medical history, significant test results, recommendations (treatment plan) and patient follow-up were communicated to a greater extent when the tools are used. We also found that physicians spent more time at the bedside and less time consulting medical records using these tools. CONCLUSION: The present study showed how in-depth observations and analyses of real work processes can be used to better support the quality of patient care. [less ▲]

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See detailELISA : ECHELLE LIÉGEOISE DE L’INDICE DE SÉVÉRITÉ À L’ADMISSION
JOBE, Jérôme ULg; Ghuysen, Alexandre ULg; D'Orio, Vincenzo ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2012), 67(12), 632-637

Les services d’urgence sont régulièrement confrontés au problème d’encombrement à l’admission par une demande qui dépasse l’offre de soins. Il est essentiel de réguler le flux d’entrée par la mise en ... [more ▼]

Les services d’urgence sont régulièrement confrontés au problème d’encombrement à l’admission par une demande qui dépasse l’offre de soins. Il est essentiel de réguler le flux d’entrée par la mise en place d’un dispositif de tri. Ce mécanisme s’affine depuis une quinzaine d’années. Nous proposons un algorithme de tri (ELISA ou Echelle Liégeoise de l’Indice de Sévérité à l’Admission) qui vise à définir l’état d’urgence selon 5 niveaux depuis la catégorie U1 (urgence absolue) à U5 (urgence relative). Ces niveaux sont associés à un délai de contact médical (immédiat à 120 minutes) et à un trajet de soin correspondant (salle de déchoquage, secteur B ou brancard, secteur A ou ambulatoire, salle d’attente) réunissant ainsi des impératifs de temps et de lieu de prise en charge optimaux. Notre algorithme de tri montre une excellente fiabilité par la comparaison du niveau initial de la catégorisation au devenir du patient (soins intensifs, hospitalisation, et sortie du service). [less ▲]

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See detailA medieval shot
LOMBARD, Xavier ULg; Ghuysen, Alexandre ULg; D'Orio, Vincenzo ULg

Poster (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (2 ULg)