References of "Crowet, Jean-Marc"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailSurfactin: a receptor-independent bacterial elicitor of plant immunity?
Luzuriaga Loaiza, Walter ULg; Legras, Aurelien; Crowet, Jean-Marc ULg et al

Scientific conference (2015, May 13)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (3 ULg)
See detailPGPR elicitors of plant immunity: insights into the molecular basis of surfactin perception
Luzuriaga Loaiza, Walter ULg; Legras, Aurélien; Franzil, Laurent ULg et al

Scientific conference (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailModeling of the cyclic lipodepsipeptide Pseudodesmin A self-assembly through molecular dynamic simulations
Crowet, Jean-Marc ULg; Sinnaeve, Davy; Fehér, Krisztina et al

Conference (2014, September 30)

The self-assembly of short peptides into supramolecular structures represents an active field of research with potential applications, ranging from material sciences to medicine. Pseudodesmine A is a ... [more ▼]

The self-assembly of short peptides into supramolecular structures represents an active field of research with potential applications, ranging from material sciences to medicine. Pseudodesmine A is a cyclic lipodepsipeptide of nine residues which presents a moderate antibacterial activity and whose structure has been resolved by X-ray and NMR. In acetonitrile, Pseudodesmine A is monomeric while in chloroform, it has the same structure but assembles in a supramolecular complex. This structure could associate with membranes and be responsible for the biological activity of the peptide. Comparison of NMR data in the two solvents has given indications on the intermolecular contacts that arise in chloroform and a model for the self-association was proposed. To study in more details this assembly, molecular dynamics simulations have been carried on. The resultswere compared with detailed information given by NMR, regarding the dimensions of the assembly and the orientation of the individual peptide building blocks inside the supramolecular assembly. In acetonitrile, the simulations show that the peptide has transient interactions while in chloroform, interactions between monomers are always observed. In agreement with NMR, these interactions arise mainly between the backbone protons of the LEU1 and the GLN2, the GLN2 sidechain and the loop located on the opposite end of the monomer structure. From 10 simulations of dimerization, hydrogen bonds were followed and specific interaction patterns were identified regarding the hydrogen bonds formed. Peptide interactions are mainly described by 13 interaction patterns characterized by 2 to 4 hydrogen bonds. In dimers, the peptides can have a linear, a perpendicular or a side by side configuration. From the linear dimer, it is possible to reconstruct filaments and, by combining a linear and a lateral dimer, it is possible to build fibrils with multifilaments, as found in the NMR-derived model. Two self-consistent supramolecular models can be built from dimers and they present a very good correlation with NMR data regarding the supramolecular organization. Besides, the perpendicular dimer can gives peptide rings that can also explain the potential ability of this peptide to form ion pores in membranes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (6 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailModeling of the cyclic lipodepsipeptide Pseudodesmin A self-assembly through molecular dynamic simulations
Crowet, Jean-Marc ULg; Sinnaeve, Davy; Fehér, Krisztina et al

Poster (2014, August 21)

The self-assembly of short peptides into supramolecular structures represents an active field of research with potential applications, ranging from material sciences to medicine. Pseudodesmine A is a ... [more ▼]

The self-assembly of short peptides into supramolecular structures represents an active field of research with potential applications, ranging from material sciences to medicine. Pseudodesmine A is a cyclic lipodepsipeptide of nine residues which presents a moderate antibacterial activity and whose structure has been resolved by X-ray and NMR. In acetonitrile, Pseudodesmine A is monomeric while in chloroform, it has the same structure but assembles in a supramolecular complex. This structure could associate with membranes and be responsible for the biological activity of the peptide. Comparison of NMR data in the two solvents has given indications on the intermolecular contacts that arise in chloroform and a model for the self-association was proposed. To study in more details this assembly, molecular dynamics simulations have been carried on. The resultswere compared with detailed information given by NMR, regarding the dimensions of the assembly and the orientation of the individual peptide building blocks inside the supramolecular assembly. In acetonitrile, the simulations show that the peptide has transient interactions while in chloroform, interactions between monomers are always observed. In agreement with NMR, these interactions arise mainly between the backbone protons of the LEU1 and the GLN2, the GLN2 sidechain and the loop located on the opposite end of the monomer structure. From 10 simulations of dimerization, hydrogen bonds were followed and specific interaction patterns were identified regarding the hydrogen bonds formed. Peptide interactions are mainly described by 13 interaction patterns characterized by 2 to 4 hydrogen bonds. In dimers, the peptides can have a linear, a perpendicular or a side by side configuration. From the linear dimer, it is possible to reconstruct filaments and, by combining a linear and a lateral dimer, it is possible to build fibrils with multifilaments, as found in the NMR-derived model. Two self-consistent supramolecular models can be built from dimers and they present a very good correlation with NMR data regarding the supramolecular organization. Besides, the perpendicular dimer can gives peptide rings that can also explain the potential ability of this peptide to form ion pores in membranes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailModeling of the cyclic lipodepsipeptide Pseudodesmin A self-assembly through molecular dynamic simulations
Crowet, Jean-Marc ULg; Sinnaeve, Davy; Fehér, Krisztina et al

Conference (2014, August 20)

The self-assembly of short peptides into supramolecular structures represents an active field of research with potential applications, ranging from material sciences to medicine. Pseudodesmine A is a ... [more ▼]

The self-assembly of short peptides into supramolecular structures represents an active field of research with potential applications, ranging from material sciences to medicine. Pseudodesmine A is a cyclic lipodepsipeptide of nine residues which presents a moderate antibacterial activity and whose structure has been resolved by X-ray and NMR. In acetonitrile, Pseudodesmine A is monomeric while in chloroform, it has the same structure but assembles in a supramolecular complex. This structure could associate with membranes and be responsible for the biological activity of the peptide. Comparison of NMR data in the two solvents has given indications on the intermolecular contacts that arise in chloroform and a model for the self-association was proposed. To study in more details this assembly, molecular dynamics simulations have been carried on. The resultswere compared with detailed information given by NMR, regarding the dimensions of the assembly and the orientation of the individual peptide building blocks inside the supramolecular assembly. In acetonitrile, the simulations show that the peptide has transient interactions while in chloroform, interactions between monomers are always observed. In agreement with NMR, these interactions arise mainly between the backbone protons of the LEU1 and the GLN2, the GLN2 sidechain and the loop located on the opposite end of the monomer structure. From 10 simulations of dimerization, hydrogen bonds were followed and specific interaction patterns were identified regarding the hydrogen bonds formed. Peptide interactions are mainly described by 13 interaction patterns characterized by 2 to 4 hydrogen bonds. In dimers, the peptides can have a linear, a perpendicular or a side by side configuration. From the linear dimer, it is possible to reconstruct filaments and, by combining a linear and a lateral dimer, it is possible to build fibrils with multifilaments, as found in the NMR-derived model. Two self-consistent supramolecular models can be built from dimers and they present a very good correlation with NMR data regarding the supramolecular organization. Besides, the perpendicular dimer can gives peptide rings that can also explain the potential ability of this peptide to form ion pores in membranes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMembrane interactions of cyclic lipodepsipeptides from the viscosin group
Geudens, Niels; Feher, Krisztina; De Vleeschouwer et al

Poster (2014, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (4 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMolecular dynamic simulation of the cyclic lipodepsipeptide Pseudodesmin A self-assembly
Crowet, Jean-Marc ULg; Sinnaeve, Davy; Fehér, Krisztina et al

Conference (2014, February 10)

Pseudodesmine A is a cyclic lipodepsipeptide of nine residues which presents a moderate antibacterial activity and whose structure has been resolved by X-ray and NMR1,2. In acetonitrile, Pseudodesmine A ... [more ▼]

Pseudodesmine A is a cyclic lipodepsipeptide of nine residues which presents a moderate antibacterial activity and whose structure has been resolved by X-ray and NMR1,2. In acetonitrile, Pseudodesmine A is monomeric while in chloroform it has the same structure but assemble in a supramolecular complex. This structure could associate with membranes and be responsible of the biological activity of this peptide. Comparison of the NMR data between the two solvents has given indications on the intermolecular contacts that arise in chloroform and a model for the self association was proposed2,3. To study in more details this assembly, molecular dynamics have been carried on. In acetonitrile, the peptide show transient interactions while in chlorofom interactions between monomers was always observed. As stated in Sinnaeve et al. in 2009, these interactions arise mainly between the backbone protons of the LEU1 and the GLN2, the GLN2 sidechain and the loop located on the opposite end of the monomer structure. From 10 simulations of dimerization, hydrogen bonds were followed and specific interaction patterns were identified regarding the hydrogen bonds formed. The peptide interactions are mainly described by 13 interaction patterns; 8 with the peptides in a linear configuration, 1 perpendicular and 4 with peptides side by side. The patterns are characterized by 2 to 4 hydrogen bonds. From the linear dimer, it is possible to reconstruct filaments and, by combining a linear and a lateral dimer, it is possible to build fibrils with multi filaments, as expected in the NMR derived model. Besides, the perpendicular dimer can gives peptide rings that can also explain the potential ability of this peptide to form ion pores in membranes. 1. Sinnaeve, D., Michaux, C., Van hemel, J., Vandenkerckhove, J., Peys, E., Borremans, F. a. M., Sas, B., Wouters, J. and Martins, J. C. Tetrahedron 2009, 65, 4173–4181. 2. Sinnaeve, D., Hendrickx, P. M. S., Van Hemel, J., Peys, E., Kieffer, B. and Martins, J. C. Chemistry (Weinheim an der Bergstrasse, Germany) 2009, 15, 12653–62. 3. Sinnaeve, D., Delsuc, M.-A., Martins, J. C. and Kieffer, B. Chemical Science 2012, 3, 1284. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (5 ULg)
Full Text
See detailInteractions between new phenolic glycolipids and model membrane
Sainvitu, Pauline ULg; Nasir, Mehmet Nail ULg; Crowet, Jean-Marc ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

Model membrane based on phospholipids (PL) layers are useful to mimic properties of plasma membranes. The interactions between new synthesized phenolic glycolipids (PGL) and biological membrane are ... [more ▼]

Model membrane based on phospholipids (PL) layers are useful to mimic properties of plasma membranes. The interactions between new synthesized phenolic glycolipids (PGL) and biological membrane are crucial to determine their potential as drug candidates and their cytotoxicity . [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (5 ULg)
See detailSimulations of a beta amphiphilic peptide as potential surfactant of membrane proteins
Crowet, Jean-Marc ULg; Dony, Nicolas ULg; Deschamps, Antoine et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

The peptide studied here was designed to form beta amphiphilic films with the aim to stabilize purified membrane proteins. This interaction has notably been followed by FRET. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic ... [more ▼]

The peptide studied here was designed to form beta amphiphilic films with the aim to stabilize purified membrane proteins. This interaction has notably been followed by FRET. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues are alternate and positively and negatively charged residues place respectively at the start end the end of the peptide. The peptide has been studied by atomistic and coarse grained molecular dynamics in water, chloroform and mixed solutions. The peptide was observed to spontaniously form beta films at the chloroform water interface. Moreover, when we simulate the interaction of this peptide with a membrane protein and with a membrane protein in a micelle of dodecylphosphocholine. The peptide was observed to form beta films at the membrane protein surface and even remove surfactants from the membrane protein surface. The simulations confirms the behaviour of this peptide observed in vitro and shows that it could be used instead of detergents. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailExploration on structure activity relation of natural, self-assembling cyclic lipodepsipeptides
Geudens, Niels; Feher, Kristina; De Vleeschouwer, Matthias et al

Poster (2014, February)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (4 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMembrane interactions of natural cyclic lipodepsipeptides
Geudens, Niels; Féher, Krizstina; De Vleeschouwer, Matthias et al

Conference (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailComplementary biophysical tools to investigate lipid specificity in the interaction between bioactive molecules and the plasma membrane: A review
Deleu, Magali ULg; Crowet, Jean-Marc ULg; Nasir, Mehmet Nail ULg et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Biomembranes (2014), 1838

Plasma membranes are complex entities common to all living cells. The basic principle of their organization appears very simple, but they are actually of high complexity and represent very dynamic ... [more ▼]

Plasma membranes are complex entities common to all living cells. The basic principle of their organization appears very simple, but they are actually of high complexity and represent very dynamic structures. The interactions between bioactive molecules and lipids are important for numerous processes, from drug bioavailablility to viral fusion. The cell membrane is a carefully balanced environment and any change inflicted upon its structure by a bioactive molecule must be considered in conjunction with the overall effect that this may have on the function and integrity of the membrane. Conceptually, understanding the molecular mechanisms by which bioactive molecules interact with cell membranes is of fundamental importance. Lipid specificity is a key factor for the detailed understanding of the penetration and/or activity of lipid-interacting molecules and of mechanisms of some diseases. Further investigation in that way should improve drug discovery and development of membrane-active molecules in many domains such as health, plant protection or microbiology. In this review, we will present complementary biophysical approaches that can give information about lipid specificity at a molecular point of view. Examples of application will be given for different molecule types, from biomolecules to pharmacological drugs. A special emphasis is given to cyclic lipopeptides since they are interesting molecules in the scope of this review by combining a peptidic moiety and a lipidic tail and by exerting their activity via specific interactions with the plasma membrane. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (25 ULg)