References of "Covaci, Adrian"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAssessment of contaminant levels and trophic relations at a World Heritage Site by measurements in a characteristic shorebird species
Schwemmer, Philipp; Covaci, Adrian; Das, Krishna ULg et al

in Environmental Research (2015), 136

The River Elbe is responsible for influxes of contaminants into the Wadden Sea World Heritage Site. We investigated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), oxychlordane (OxC), hexachlorobenzene (HCB ... [more ▼]

The River Elbe is responsible for influxes of contaminants into the Wadden Sea World Heritage Site. We investigated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), oxychlordane (OxC), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexanes (α-, β-, γ-HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in blood and feathers from Eurasian oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus; n=28) at the Elbe and compared it with a non-riverine site about 90 km further north. (1) Mean levels of all contaminants in feathers and serum were significantly higher at the river (ƩPCBs: 27.6 ng/g feather, 37.0 ng/ml serum; ƩDDTs: 5.3 ng/g feather, 4.4 ng/ml serum) compared with the non-riverine site (ƩPCBs: 6.5 ng/g feather, 1.2 ng/ml serum; ƩDDTs: 1.4 ng/g feather, 0.5 ng/ml serum). Mean ƩHCH and HCB levels were <1.8 ng/g in feather and <1.8 ng/ml in serum at both sites. (2) Levels of most detectable compounds in serum and feathers were significantly related, but levels were not consistently higher in either tissue. (3) There was no significant relationship between trophic level in individual oystercatchers (expressed as δ15N) or the degree of terrestrial feeding (expressed as δ13C) and contaminant loads. (4) PBDEs were not detected in significant amounts at either site. The results of this study indicate that the outflow from one of Europe’s largest river systems is associated with significant historical contamination, reflected by the accumulation of contaminants in body tissues in a coastal benthivore predator. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMaternal transfer of organohalogenated compounds in sharks and stingrays
Weijs, Liesbeth; Briels, Nathalie; Adams, Douglas et al

in Marine Pollution Bulletin (2015)

Elasmobranchs can bioaccumulate considerable amounts of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and utilize several reproductive strategies thereby influencing maternal transfer of contaminants. This study ... [more ▼]

Elasmobranchs can bioaccumulate considerable amounts of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and utilize several reproductive strategies thereby influencing maternal transfer of contaminants. This study provides preliminary data on the POP transfer from pregnant females to offspring of three species (Atlantic stingrays, bonnethead, blacktip sharks) with different reproduction modes (aplacental, placental viviparity). Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels were generally higher than any other POPs. Stingrays and blacktip shark embryos contained the lowest POP concentrations while bonnetheads and the blacktip adult female had the highest concentrations. Results suggest that are more readily transferred from the mother to the embryo compared to what is transferred to ova in stingrays. Statistically significant differences in levels of selected POPs were found between embryos from the left and right uterus within the same litter as well as between female and male embryos within the same litter for bonnetheads, but not for the blacktip sharks. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBioaccumulation of organohalogenated compounds in sharks and rays from the southeastern USA
Weijs, Liesbeth; Briels, Nathalie; Adams, Douglas et al

in Environmental Research (2015), 137

Organohalogenated compounds are widespread in the marine environment and can be a serious threat to organisms in all levels of aquatic food webs, including elasmobranch species. Information about the ... [more ▼]

Organohalogenated compounds are widespread in the marine environment and can be a serious threat to organisms in all levels of aquatic food webs, including elasmobranch species. Information about the concentrations of POPs (persistent organic pollutants) and of MeO-PBDEs (methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers) in elasmobranchs is scarce and potential toxic effects are poorly understood. The aims of the present study were therefore to investigate the occurrence of multiple POP classes (PCBs, PBDEs, DDXs, HCB, CHLs) and of MeO-PBDEs in various elasmobranch species from different trophic levels in estuarine and marine waters of the southeastern United States. Overall, levels and patterns of PCBs, PBDEs, DDXs, HCB, CHLs and of MeO-PBDEs varied according to the species, maturity stage, gender and habitat type. The lowest levels of POPs were found in Atlantic stingrays and the highest levels were found in bull sharks. As both species are respectively near the bottom and at top of the trophic web, with juvenile bull sharks frequently feeding on Atlantic stingrays, these findings further suggest a bioaccumulation and biomagnification process with trophic position. MeO-PBDEs were not detected in Atlantic stingrays, but were found in all shark species. HCB was not found in Atlantic stingrays, bonnetheads or lemon sharks, but was detected in the majority of bull sharks examined. Comparison with previous studies suggests that Atlantic stingrays may be experiencing toxic effects of PCBs and DDXs on their immune system. However, the effect of these compounds on the health of shark species remains unclear. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDevelopment and application of a non-targeted extraction method for the analysis of migrating compounds from plastic baby bottles by GC-MS
Onghena, Matthias; van Hoeck, Els; Vervliet, Philippe et al

in Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A. Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment (2014), 31(12), 2090-2102

In 2011, the European Union prohibited the production of polycarbonate (PC) baby bottles due to the toxic effects of the PC monomer bisphenol-A. Therefore, baby bottles made of alternative materials, e.g ... [more ▼]

In 2011, the European Union prohibited the production of polycarbonate (PC) baby bottles due to the toxic effects of the PC monomer bisphenol-A. Therefore, baby bottles made of alternative materials, e.g. polypropylene (PP) or polyethersulphone (PES), are currently marketed. The principal aim of the study was the identification of major compounds migrating from baby bottles using a liquid–liquid extraction followed by GC/MS analysis. A 50% EtOH in water solution was selected as a simulant for milk. After sterilisation of the bottle, three migration experiments were performed during 2 h at 70°C. A nontargeted liquid–liquid extraction with ethyl acetate–n-hexane (1:1) was performed on the simulant samples. Identification of migrants from 24 baby bottles was done using commercially available WILEY and NIST mass spectra libraries. Differences in the migrating compounds and their intensities were observed between the different types of plastics, but also between the same polymer from a different producer. Differences in the migration patterns were perceived as well between the sterilisation and the migrations and within the different migrations. Silicone, Tritan™ and PP exhibited a wide variety of migrating compounds, whereas PES and polyamide (PA) showed a lower amount of migrants, though sometimes in relatively large concentrations (azacyclotridecan-2-one up to 250 µg kg−1 ). Alkanes (especially in PP bottles), phthalates (dibutylphthalate in one PP bottle (±40 µg kg−1 ) and one silicone bottle (±25 µg kg−1 ); diisobutylphthalate in one PP (±10 µg kg−1 ), silicone (up to ±80 µg kg−1 ); and Tritan™ bottle (±30 µg kg−1 )), antioxidants (Irgafos 168, degradation products of Irganox 1010 and Irganox 1076), etc. were detected for PP, silicone and Tritan™ bottles. Although the concentrations were relatively low, some compounds not authorised by European Union Regulation No. 10/2011, such as 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol (10–100 µg kg−1 ) or 2-butoxyethyl acetate (about 300 µg kg−1 ) were detected. Migrating chemicals were identified as confirmed (using a standard) or as tentative (further confirmation required). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (5 ULg)
Full Text
See detailIn vitro model to study the endocrine disrupting activity of migration products from plastic food contact materials
Simon, Coraline ULg; Onghena, Matthias; Covaci, Adrian et al

Poster (2014, May 15)

Bisphenol A (BPA) is used since 1960 as a primary raw material for the production of polycarbonate (PC) plastic and epoxy resin, which are widely used in a variety of common products including digital ... [more ▼]

Bisphenol A (BPA) is used since 1960 as a primary raw material for the production of polycarbonate (PC) plastic and epoxy resin, which are widely used in a variety of common products including digital media (e.g., CDs, DVDs), electrical and electronic equipment, automobiles, sports safety equipment, reusable food and drink containers , as well as baby bottle. During the last decades, in several studies, the migration of BPA is documented to be a well-known source of food contamination. The measurements of BPA in human fluids and tissues highlighted that its presence in food constitutes the primary route of human exposure. Some studies showed that BPA, which could disrupt normal endocrine function by mimicking estrogen hormones,, may be associated to several health problems and diseases. Recently, the European food safety authority conducted a risk assessment on BPA and concluded that though studies related to potential health hazards associated with BPA, are suggesting a potential negative effect on human body, but results are still uncertain. Following that screening assessment, the European Union took a series of measures, including a ban for the manufacture, import and sale of PC baby bottles to reduce BPA exposure of infants. Plastic alternatives to polycarbonate have massively appeared on Belgium market. Although there are several studies on BPA migration from polycarbonate into foodstuff under various conditions, there is a small amount of information about consequences on human health of the chemicals migrating from PC alternatives, including bottles commonly labelled “free BPA”. In a recent opinion (No. 8697, 11.03.2010), the Belgium Superior Health Council's issued its concern regarding the currently used alternatives to PC. Furthermore, they asked to investigate the possible risks associated with the use of these alternatives. To know if these alternatives are safe, the activity on several receptors (estrogen (ER), androgen (AR), progesterone (PR) and glucocorticoïd receptor (GR)) of chemicals migrating from PC alternatives, identified by Simoneau & al, 2012 , were evaluated using reporter gene assays. Agonistic and antagonistic activities of 38 pure compounds were measured. After the first screening, some substances clearly showed an activity on each receptor, such as BPA, 2.4- dimethyl benzaldehyde (C4), Bisphenol S (C49), while other subtances reacted on three, two or one receptor. Only 5 substances showed no activity. For active substances only, the study will be continued and a full dose-response curve will be performed in order to assess quantitatively the activity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSteroid-like activity of migration products from non polycarbonate plastic baby bottles.
Simon, Coraline ULg; Onghena, Matthias; Covaci, Adrian et al

in Toxicology Letters (2014), 229

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMobilisation of lipophilic pollutants from blubber in northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris) during the post-weaning fast
Louis, Caroline; Dirtu, Alin C.; Stas, Marie et al

in Environmental Research (2014), 132

Northern elephant seals (NES) (Mirounga angustirostris) from the Año Nuevo State Reserve (CA, USA) were longitudinally sampled during the post-weaning fast in order to study the mobilisation and ... [more ▼]

Northern elephant seals (NES) (Mirounga angustirostris) from the Año Nuevo State Reserve (CA, USA) were longitudinally sampled during the post-weaning fast in order to study the mobilisation and redistribution of various classes of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p′-DDE) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) between blubber and blood. Inner and outer blubber layers were analysed separately. Organohalogenated compounds were detected in all blubber samples in the decreasing order of their concentrations: p,p′-DDE>PCBs⪢HCB>PBDEs. The concentrations of all studied compounds were homogeneously distributed in the blubber layer at early fast, since the concentrations of POPs were statistically not different in the inner and outer layers. With the progression of the fast, the concentrations of PBDEs, PCBs and p,p′-DDE increased more sharply in inner blubber than in outer blubber. As a result, their levels became significantly higher in inner blubber as compared to outer blubber at late fast. The rise of pollutant concentrations in blubber might result from a less efficient mobilisation than triglycerides and/or a reuptake by adipocytes of some of the pollutants released into the circulation. The mobilisation of pollutants from blubber was higher at late fast. An increase of pollutant concentrations was observed in serum between early and late fast. Lower halogenated congeners (i.e. tetra-CBs) were present in higher proportions in serum, whereas the higher halogenated congeners (i.e. hepta-CBs) were mainly found in the inner and outer blubber layers. The transfer ratios of both PBDEs and PCBs from inner blubber to serum decreased with the number of chlorine and bromine atoms. In addition, the distribution of both types of compounds between serum and blubber was strongly influenced by their lipophilic character (log Kow values), with more lipophilic compounds being less efficiently released from blubber to serum. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBrominated and phosphorus flame retardants in White-tailed Eagle Haliaeetus albicilla nestlings: Bioaccumulation and associations with dietary proxies (δ13C, δ15N and δ34S)
Eulaers, Igor; Jaspers, Veerle; Halley, Duncan et al

in Science of the Total Environment (2014), 478

Very little is known on the exposure of high trophic level species to current-use brominated (BFRs) and phosphorus flame retardants (PFRs), although observations on their persistence, bioaccumulation ... [more ▼]

Very little is known on the exposure of high trophic level species to current-use brominated (BFRs) and phosphorus flame retardants (PFRs), although observations on their persistence, bioaccumulation potential, and toxicity have been made. We investigated the accumulation of BFRs and PFRs, and their associations with dietary proxies (δ13C, δ15N and δ34S), in plasma and feathers of White-tailed Eagle Haliaeetus albicilla nestlings from Trøndelag, Norway. In addition to accumulation of a wide range of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners in both plasma and feathers, all non-PBDE BFRs and PFRs could be measured in feathers, while in plasma only two of six PFRs, i.e. tris-(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP) and tris-(2,3-dichloropropyl) phosphate (TDCPP) were detected. PFR concentrations in feathers (0.95-3,000 ng g-1) were much higher than selected organochlorines (OCs), such as polychlorinated biphenyl 153 (CB 153; 2.3-15 ng g-1) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p’-DDE; 2.3-21 ng g-1), PBDEs (0.03-2.3 ng g-1) and non-PBDE BFRs (0.03-1.5 ng g-1). Non-significant associations of PFR concentrations in feathers with those in plasma (P≥0.74), and their similarity to reported atmospheric PFR concentrations, may suggest atmospheric PFR deposition on feathers. Most OCs and PBDEs, as well as tris(chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(phenyl) phosphate (TPHP) and tri-(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) were associated to δ15N and/or δ13C (all P≤0.02). Besides δ15N enrichment, δ34S was depleted in nestlings from fjords, inherently close to an urbanised centre. As such, both may have been a spatial proxy for anthropogenic disturbance, possible confounding their use as dietary proxy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailIn vitro model to study the endocrine disrupting activity of migration products from plastic food contact materials
Simon, Coraline ULg; Onghena, Matthias; Covaci, Adrian et al

Poster (2013, December 06)

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical compound mainly used for the manufacture of plastic such as polycarbonate. This transparent thermoplastic polymer is used for the fabrication of several food containers ... [more ▼]

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical compound mainly used for the manufacture of plastic such as polycarbonate. This transparent thermoplastic polymer is used for the fabrication of several food containers like baby bottle, cups, etc. BPA can migrate into food in contact with polycarbonate. There is a worldwide concern about BPA because several studies have shown endocrine disruptor potency of BPA causing possible adverse health effects. In January 2011, the European Commission decided to ban the use of polycarbonate to manufacture baby feeding bottles. In a recent opinion, the Superior Health Council’s issued its concern regarding the currently use of alternatives to polycarbonate in these materials. This work is part of the ALTPOLYCARB project, which aims to study the migration products from non polycarbonate plastic material, and their endocrine disruptor activities. The endocrine disruptor activity(ies) of global migration residues obtained from different kinds of baby bottles will be explored using cell based transactivational assays also named “reporter gene assays”. The MCF7 recombinant cells used here (named MCF7-ER cells) are genetically modified cells containing the firefly luciferase gene, as a reporter gene, and a DNA responsive element specific to the human estrogen receptor. The biological activity of a chemical compound is monitored by the measurement of light emitted by the cells exposed to it (after addition of luciferin, the substrate of luciferase). In a preliminary step, we first screened pure substances, which were shown to migrate from plastic baby bottles, in a recent study performed by Simoneau & al, 2012 . Human estrogen receptor agonistic and antagonistic activities of 25 pure compounds were measured using MCF7-ER cells. After the first screening, some substances clearly show an activity such as BPA, benzophenone, 2-propenoic acid-2-ethylhexyl ester, benzaldehyde-4-methylthio, butylated hydroxytoluene and dodecanoic acid methyl ester, whereas others ask an in-depth analysis to confirm their activity. For active substances only, the study will be continued and a full dose-response curve will be performed in order to assess quantitatively the activity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailIn vitro model to study the endocrine disrupting activity of migration products from plastic food contact materials
Simon, Coraline ULg; Onghena, Matthias; Covaci, Adrian et al

Poster (2013, November 06)

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical compound mainly used for the manufacture of plastic such as polycarbonate. This transparent thermoplastic polymer is used for the fabrication of several food containers ... [more ▼]

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical compound mainly used for the manufacture of plastic such as polycarbonate. This transparent thermoplastic polymer is used for the fabrication of several food containers like baby bottle … BPA can migrate into food in contact with polycarbonate. There is a worldwide concern about BPA because several studies have shown endocrine disruptor potency of BPA causing possible adverse health effects. In January 2011, the European Commission decided to ban the use of polycarbonate to manufacture baby feeding bottles. In a recent opinion, the Superior Health Council’s issued its concern regarding the currently use of alternatives to polycarbonate in these materials. This work is part of the ALTPOLYCARB project which aims to study the migration products of alternative to polycarbonate and their endocrine disruptor activities. The first part was to have an overview of the different polymers replacing polycarbonate, that are used on the Belgian market, it resulted in the conclusion that polymers used for the manufacture of baby bottles are mainly polypropylene, polyethersulfone, silicone, polyamide, polystyrene, and melamine. The second part of this work will be to evaluate the endocrine disruptor activity(ies) of global migration residues obtained from different kinds of baby bottles. This (these) activity(ies) will be explored using cell based transactivational assays also named “reporter gene assays. The MCF7 recombinant cells used here are genitically modified cells containing the firefly luciferase gene, as a reporter gene, and a DNA responsive element specific to the human oestrogen receptor. The biological activity of a chemical compound is monitored by the measurement of light emitted by the cells exposed to it (after addition of luciferin, the substrate of luciferase). In a preliminary step, we first screened pure substances which were shown to migrate from plastic baby bottle, in a recent study performed by Simoneau & al, 2012 . Human estrogen receptor agonistic and antagonistic activities of 25 pure compounds were measured using MCF7-ER cells (genetically modified MCF7 cells). After the first screening, some substances clearly show an activity such as BPA, Benzophenone, 2-Propenoic acid-2-ethylhexyl ester, Benzaldehyde-4-methylthio, Butylated hydroxytoluene and Dodecanoic acid, methyl ester whereas others ask an in-depth analysis to confirm their activity. For active substances only the study will be continued and a full dose-response curve will be performed in order to assess quantitatively the activity [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFactors influencing the bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants in food webs of the Scheldt estuary
Van Ael, Evy; Covaci, Adrian; Das, Krishna ULg et al

in Environmental Science & Technology (2013)

Concentrations of several persistent organic pollutants (POPs: PCBs, PBDEs, OCPs) in aquatic species from the Scheldt estuary were related with factors (body size, lipids, trophic position), possibly ... [more ▼]

Concentrations of several persistent organic pollutants (POPs: PCBs, PBDEs, OCPs) in aquatic species from the Scheldt estuary were related with factors (body size, lipids, trophic position), possibly influencing their bioaccumulation. Stable nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) were used as a measure for trophic position. A decreasing trend in POP levels towards the sea was observed. For POP concentrations in sediments, this trend could be attributed to a dilution effect from mixing with seawater. However, concentrations in biota more downstream were higher than expected after taking into account the dilution effect, possibly due to differences in bioavailability. Tissue concentrations were correlated with the lipid content in biota, but not with body size. Biomagnification was only significant for some PCB congeners and p,p'-DDE at the most marine sampling location (Terneuzen, L1) and for p,p'-DDD and BDE 100 at the second sampling location (Bath, L2). A significant decreasing relationship was found for ɣ-HCH concentrations with increasing δ15N at Terneuzen. For Antwerpen (L3), no significant relationships were detected. TMFs ranged from 0.64 for ɣ-HCH up to 1.60 for PCB 194. These results suggest that biomagnification was more important in the marine part of the estuary, although the presence of multiple carbon sources at the freshwater side might have led to an underestimation of the influence of trophic position. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRelationships between in vitro lymphoproliferative responses and levels of contaminants in blood of free-ranging adult harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) from the North Sea
Dupont, Aurélie ULg; Siebert, Ursula; Covaci, Adrian et al

in Aquatic Toxicology (2013), 142-143

tIn vitro culture of peripheral blood leucocytes (PBLs) is currently used in toxicological studies of marinemammals. However, blood cells of wild individuals are exposed in vivo to environmental ... [more ▼]

tIn vitro culture of peripheral blood leucocytes (PBLs) is currently used in toxicological studies of marinemammals. However, blood cells of wild individuals are exposed in vivo to environmental contaminantsbefore being isolated and exposed to contaminants in vitro. The aim of this study was to highlightpotential relationships between blood contaminant levels and in vitro peripheral blood lymphocyteproliferation in free-ranging adult harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) from the North Sea. Blood samplesof 18 individuals were analyzed for trace elements (Fe, Zn, Se, Cu, Hg, Pb, Cd) and persistent organiccontaminants and metabolites ( PCBs, HO-PCBs, PBDEs, 2-MeO-BDE68 and 6-MeO-BDE47, DDXs,hexachlorobenzene, oxychlordane, trans-nonachlor, pentachlorophenol and tribromoanisole). The samesamples were used to determine the haematology profiles, cell numbers and viability, as well as thein vitro ConA-induced lymphocyte proliferation expressed as a stimulation index (SI). Correlation tests(Bravais-Pearson) and Principal Component Analysis with multiple regression revealed no statisticallysignificant relationship between the lymphocyte SI and the contaminants studied. However, the numberof lymphocytes per millilitre of whole blood appeared to be negatively correlated to pentachlorophenol(r = −0.63, p = 0.005). In adult harbour seals, the interindividual variations of in vitro lymphocyte pro-liferation did not appear to be directly linked to pollutant levels present in the blood, and it is likelythat other factors such as age, life history, or physiological parameters have an influence. In a generalmanner, experiments with in vitro immune cell cultures of wild marine mammals should be designed soas to minimize confounding factors in which case they remain a valuable tool to study pollutant effectsin vitro. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailApplication of Bayesian Population Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Modeling and Markov Chain Monte Carlo Simulations to Pesticide Kinetics Studies in Protected Marine Mammals: DDT, DDE, and DDD in Harbor Porpoises
Weijs, Liesbeth; Yang, Raymond S.H.; Das, Krishna ULg et al

in Environmental Science & Technology (2013), 47

Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling in marine mammals is a challenge because of the lack of parameter information and the ban on exposure experiments. To minimize uncertainty and ... [more ▼]

Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling in marine mammals is a challenge because of the lack of parameter information and the ban on exposure experiments. To minimize uncertainty and variability, parameter estimation methods are required for the development of reliable PBPK models. The present study is the first to develop PBPK models for the lifetime bioaccumulation of p,p′-DDT, p,p′-DDE, and p,p′- DDD in harbor porpoises. In addition, this study is also the first to apply the Bayesian approach executed with Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations using two data sets of harbor porpoises from the Black and North Seas. Parameters from the literature were used as priors for the first “model update” using the Black Sea data set, the resulting posterior parameters were then used as priors for the second “model update” using the North Sea data set. As such, PBPK models with parameters specific for harbor porpoises could be strengthened with more robust probability distributions. As the science and biomonitoring effort progress in this area, more data sets will become available to further strengthen and update the parameters in the PBPK models for harbor porpoises as a species anywhere in the world. Further, such an approach could very well be extended to other protected marine mammals. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA review of dietary and non-dietary exposure to bisphenol-A.
Geens, Tinne; Aerts, Dominique; Berthot, Carl et al

in Food and chemical toxicology : an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association (2012), 50(10), 3725-40

Due to the large number of applications of bisphenol-A (BPA), the human exposure routes are multiple. We aimed to review shortly the food and non-food sources of BPA, and to evaluate their contribution to ... [more ▼]

Due to the large number of applications of bisphenol-A (BPA), the human exposure routes are multiple. We aimed to review shortly the food and non-food sources of BPA, and to evaluate their contribution to the human exposure. Food sources discussed here include epoxy resins, polycarbonate and other applications, such as paperboard and polyvinylchloride materials. Among the non-food sources, exposures through dust, thermal paper, dental materials, and medical devices were summarized. Based on the available data for these exposure sources, it was concluded that the exposure to BPA from non-food sources is generally lower than that from exposure from food by at least one order of magnitude for most studied subgroups. The use of urinary concentrations from biomonitoring studies was evaluated and the back-calculation of BPA intake seems reliable for the overall exposure assessment. In general, the total exposure to BPA is several orders of magnitude lower than the current tolerable daily intake of 50 mug/kg bw/day. Finally, the paper concludes with some critical remarks and recommendations on future human exposure studies to BPA. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailComputational toxicology: Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models (PBPK) for lifetime exposure and bioaccumulation of polybrominated dephenyl ethers (PBDEs) in marine mammals
Weijs, Liesbeth; Covaci, Adrian; Yang, Raymond S H et al

in Environmental Pollution (2012)

Due to migration of harbour porpoises towards more polluted areas like the North Sea and their sensitivity towards pollution, there is a need for proper conservation measures for this species. As a ... [more ▼]

Due to migration of harbour porpoises towards more polluted areas like the North Sea and their sensitivity towards pollution, there is a need for proper conservation measures for this species. As a consequence, knowledge about the pollutant’s kinetics is required. The present study is the first to investigate the kinetics of PBDEs in marine mammals using PBPK modeling as a non-destructive tool for describing the chemical’s kinetics in a protected animal species. The models were developed and parameterized using data from the literature and Black Sea harbour porpoises through computer opti- mization. The predictability of these models in time was assessed by reverse dosimetry modeling using data from North Sea porpoises (1990e2008). From these predictions, PBDE 99 levels were found to decrease the fastest, followed by PBDE 153, 47 and 100. Results show that the PBPK models can be applied for harbour porpoises from different regions and also simulate time trends. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUse of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models in Marine Mammal Toxicology
Weijs, Liesbeth; Yang, Raymond S.H.; Das, Krishna ULg et al

in Kawaguchi, M.; Misaki, K.; Sato, H. (Eds.) et al Interdisciplinary Studies on Environmental Chemistry—Environmental Pollution and Ecotoxicology (2012)

Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are mathematical models that are largely based upon the physiological characteristics of the species and the biochemical properties of the chemical of ... [more ▼]

Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are mathematical models that are largely based upon the physiological characteristics of the species and the biochemical properties of the chemical of interest. They quantitatively describe and predict the kinetics of pollutants inside the body and can be of major importance for risk assessment of chemicals in marine mammals. PBPK models which consist of five compartments (liver, blubber, kidney, brain, and the rest of the body) were made for selected polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in order to address the bioaccumulation of these compounds in tissues of harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena). Harbour porpoises have relatively long life spans, are common cetaceans in the North Sea, a heavily polluted area, and are known to be very sensitive to pollution. Models developed for all compounds (some PCBs and PBDEs) were evaluated using existing datasets from the literature and from analyses performed by GC-MS, the latter being obtained from stranded porpoises in the Black Sea and the North Sea over a period of 18 years (1990–2008) to assess spatial and temporal trends in bioaccumulation of the respective PCBs and PBDEs. We demonstrate that PBPK models are a feasible computational approach that can be used as a non-destructive tool for predicting the chemical pollution status of the marine mammals. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPotential effects of blood contaminants on immune responses in harbour seals (Phoca vitulina)
Dupont, Aurélie ULg; Weijs, Liesbeth; Siebert, Ursula et al

Poster (2011, August 23)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (5 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe harbor seal and the harbor porpoise from the North Sea: review of their ecotoxicological status based on stranded and free-ranging individuals and potential threaths to the population
Das, Krishna ULg; Weijs, Liesbeth; Habran, Sarah ULg et al

Conference (2011, May)

The harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) and the harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) from the North Sea have experienced major fluctuations these last decades due to habitat loss, prey fluctuation and pollution ... [more ▼]

The harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) and the harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) from the North Sea have experienced major fluctuations these last decades due to habitat loss, prey fluctuation and pollution of the marine environment. Recently, development of monitoring programs and non-invasive sampling techniques, including seal catches in Germany allowed blood sampling together with measurements of blubber thickness, body mass, sex and body length. This approach is complementary to the study of stranded and by-caught individuals sampled during necropsies. Essential (Se, Zn, Cu, Fe) and non-essential elements (T-Hg, MeHg, Cd, Pb), perfluorinated organochemicals (PFCs) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were measured in blubber and in blood (for selected compounds) of stranded, by-caught and free-ranging individuals from Belgian and German coasts. In contrast to Cd and Pb, hepatic T-Hg can reach concentrations as high as 2.1 μg.g-1 dry weight but depended on several factors including position in the trophic chain (inferred from δ13C and δ15N values), age group and the body mass. This level has been shown to generate in vitro toxicity on harbor seal lymphocytes. Organic compound analysis (PFCs, PCBs, PBDEs) revealed widespread dispersion of contaminants in the marine environment with higher concentrations in seals compared to porpoises in agreement with the higher trophic position of the harbor seal. However, metabolization of these compounds differed between the two species, as revealed by the higher contribution of the persistent BDE-47 and lower chlorinated and non-persistent congeners (e.g. CB 52, CB95) in tissues of harbor porpoises. T-Hg, PFCs, PCBs and PBDEs were detected in calves confirming maternal transfer to offspring. These pollutants are strongly suspected to affect the immune and endocrine systems as well as vitamin A metabolism and this raises concern about exposure-related health effects, especially in younger individuals. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 142 (17 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThyroid endocrine disruption in situ and in vivo experiments reveals compensatory mechanisms
Schnitzler, Joseph ULg; Celis, Niko; Klaren, Peter et al

Conference (2011, May)

We compared effects of in situ and in vivo exposure of EDC on teleost thyroid system in order to get a complete picture of the putative interactions. A 120-day experimental exposure was designed in ... [more ▼]

We compared effects of in situ and in vivo exposure of EDC on teleost thyroid system in order to get a complete picture of the putative interactions. A 120-day experimental exposure was designed in combination to in situ measurements of persistent organic pollutants in 87 wild sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) form European estuaries. Seventy-five individuals were exposed to doses of PCB (0.3 to 1.0 µg Σ7PCBs per g food pellets) that reflects the persistent organic pollution to which the European sea bass population could conceivably be exposed. We applied a series of recommended measurement endpoints in these studies. The centrally controlled thyroidal secretion of T4 was monitored adequately from the muscular T4 levels and from thyroid histological appearance. Muscular T3 levels and enzymatic deiodinase and sulfatase activities in liver were measured. Observations made in experimental exposure to environmental relevant doses of PCB were consistent with those made in our field study. In both studies the muscular T4 levels were unaffected and no multivariate relationship with contaminant exposure could be revealed. Measurements of follicular diameter and epithelial cell heights showed no significant differences. Our findings revealed an increase of the hepatic T4ORD activity by higher chlorinated PCB congeners and DDTs. In both studies, we observed a general decrease the thyroid hormone conjugation by sulfatases that increases their solubility and facilitates their excretion. The muscular T3 levels were well preserved. These changes likely represent compensatory responses to disrupting effects that might otherwise have depressed T3 levels. This approach permitted us to interpret the causes and implications of alterations of the teleost thyroid system. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (16 ULg)