References of "Coulibaly, Ibourahema"
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See detailTechniques de séchage des starters lactiques et mécanismes affectant la viabilité cellulaire suite à la lyophilisation
Coulibaly, Ibourahema ULg; Dubois Dauphin, Robin ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2011), 15(2), 287-299

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See detailThe Resistance to Freeze-Drying and to Storage Was Determined as the Cellular Ability to Recover Its Survival Rate and Acidification Activity
Coulibaly, Ibourahema ULg; Dubois-dauphin, Robin; Destain, Jacqueline ULg et al

in International Journal of Microbiology (2010), 2010(625239),

The protective effects of the fatty acid composition and membrane action of the acidification activity of two strains of Lactobacillus kept at 20◦C were studied. The addition of sorbitol, monosodium ... [more ▼]

The protective effects of the fatty acid composition and membrane action of the acidification activity of two strains of Lactobacillus kept at 20◦C were studied. The addition of sorbitol, monosodium glutamate and glycerol during storage is causing the decline of acidification and increased concentrations of unsaturated fatty acids observed in both strains. The addition of sorbitol and monosodium glutamate does not alter the fatty acid composition, whatever the strain, but increases the resistance to freeze-drying of L. plantarum CWBI-B1419 and improves survival during storage. The addition of these preservatives and decreased activity of acidification improves the ratio unsaturated. These results indicate that the survival during storage and freeze-drying resistance are closely related to the composition of membrane fatty acids. This behaviour can be interpreted as an adaptation of L. plantarum B1419-CWBI supplemented by cryoprotectant additives such as sorbitol or monosodium glutamate sorbitol and monosodium glutamate as an additive. L. plantarum CWBI-B1419 presents a greater adaptation to culture conditions than L. paracasei ssp. paracasei LMG9192T. [less ▲]

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See detailDetermination of phospholipids extracted from Tsukamurella paurometabola C-924 after freeze-drying and during the subsequent storage.
Coulibaly, Ibourahema ULg; Yao, Amenan Anastasie ULg; Dubois Dauphin, Robin ULg et al

Poster (2009, April 01)

The total lipids of Tsukamurella paurometabola C-924 were analysed after freeze-drying. Seven individual lipids classes were identified namly neutral lipids (NLs), fatty acids (FAs), phospholipids (PLs ... [more ▼]

The total lipids of Tsukamurella paurometabola C-924 were analysed after freeze-drying. Seven individual lipids classes were identified namly neutral lipids (NLs), fatty acids (FAs), phospholipids (PLs), sterol ester (SEs), triglycerides (TGs), diglycerides (DGs) and monoglycerides (MGs). The principal fatty acids identified in most lipid classes were palmitic (C16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1), oleic (C18:1), linoleic (C18:2), and linolenic (C18:3). PLs were the major constituents and accounted for 50-60% of the total lipids. PLs were fractionated. . PLs of Tsukamurella paurometabola content phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylcholine (PC), sphingomyelin (SM), lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). It was observed that PG had the highest proportion at most points relative to other PLs and was the predominant component of PLs (30%-56%). Evolution of individual rate was followed during stored at 20°C and 40°C with or without lithothamne400®, respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailSurvival of Freeze-dried Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus plantarum Related to Their Cellular Fatty Acids Composition during Storage
Coulibaly, Ibourahema ULg; Yao, Amenan Anastasie ULg; Lognay, Georges ULg et al

in Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology (2009), 157(1), 70-84

Lactic acid bacteria strains Lactobacillus plantarum CWBI-B534 and Leuconostoc ssp. mesenteroïdes (L. mesenteroïdes) Kenya MRog2 were produced in bioreactor, concentrated, with or without cryoprotectants ... [more ▼]

Lactic acid bacteria strains Lactobacillus plantarum CWBI-B534 and Leuconostoc ssp. mesenteroïdes (L. mesenteroïdes) Kenya MRog2 were produced in bioreactor, concentrated, with or without cryoprotectants. In general, viable population did not change significantly after freeze-drying (p>0.05). In most cases, viable population for cells added with cryoprotectants was significantly lower than those without (p<0.05). Cellular fatty acids (CFAs) from the two strains in this study were analyzed before and after freeze-drying. Six CFAs were identified, namely, palmitic (C16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1), stearic (C18:0), oleic (C18:1), linoleic (C18:2), and linolenic (C18:3) acids were identified. Four of them, C16:0, C16:1, C18:0, and C18:1, make up more than 94% or 93% of the fatty acids in L. mesenteroides and L. plantarum, respectively, with another one, namely, C18:3, making a smaller (on average 5–6%, respectively) contribution. The C18:2 contributed very small percentages (on average≤1%) to the total in each strain. C16:0 had the highest proportion at most points relative to other fatty acids. Moisture content and water activity (a w) increased significantly during the storage period. It was observed that C16:1/C16:0, C18:0/C16:0 and C18:1/C16:0 ratios for freeze-dried L. mesenteroides or L. plantarum, with or without cryoprotectants, did not change significantly during the storage period. According to the packaging mode and storage temperatures, C18:2/C16:0 and C18:3/C16:0 ratios for freeze-dried L. mesenteroides and L. plantarum with or without cryoprotectants decreased as the storage time increased. However, a higher C18:2/C16:0 or C18:3/C16:0 ratio for L. mesenteroides and L. plantarum was noted in the freeze-dried powder held at 4 °C or under vacuum and in dark than at 20 °C or in the presence of oxygen and light [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of polyunsaturated fatty acid degradation on survival and acidification activity of freeze-dried Weissella paramesenteroides LC11 during storage
Yao, Amenan Anastasie ULg; Coulibaly, Ibourahema ULg; Lognay, Georges ULg et al

in Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology (2008), 79(6), 1045-1052

Abstract The impact of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) degradation on the survival and acidification activity of freeze-dried Weissella paramesenteroides LC11 was investigated over 90-days storage at 4 ... [more ▼]

Abstract The impact of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) degradation on the survival and acidification activity of freeze-dried Weissella paramesenteroides LC11 was investigated over 90-days storage at 4 °C or 20 °C in vacuumsealed aluminium foil or glass tubes with two water activities (aw=0.11 or 0.23). Colony counts, acidification activity (% lactic acid/g), linoleic/palmitic (18:2/16:0) or linolenic/palmitic (18:3/16:0) ratio by gas chromatography and 18:2 or 18:3 oxylipins by reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography were determined. The viable cells, acidification activity and 18:2/16:0 or 18:3/ 16:0 ratio decreased as the storage time increased. The survival, acidification activity and 18:2/16:0 or 18:3/16:0 ratio were greatest for the freeze-dried strain held in vacuum-sealed aluminium foil at 4 °C. The 18:2/16:0 or 18:3/16:0 ratio decrease was correlated with the accumulation of 18:2 or 18:3 oxylipins during storage in glass tubes. Hydroperoxy PUFAs, hydroxy PUFAs, divinyl ether PUFAs and oxo PUFAs were the main oxylipins identified. A large decrease in the 18:2/16:0 or 18:3/16:0 ratio and a rapid accumulation of oxylipins during storage might be enough to cause high cell death and loss of metabolic activity. These results provide further experimental support for the hypothesis that lipid oxidation and survival or activity of freeze-dried bacteria might be related. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from poultry farms in Senegal
Coulibaly, Ibourahema ULg; Dubois Dauphin, Robin ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg et al

in African Journal of Biotechnology (2008), 7(12), 2006-2012

The group that includes the lactic acid bacteria is one of the most diverse groups of bacteria known and these organisms have been characterized extensively by using different techniques. In this study ... [more ▼]

The group that includes the lactic acid bacteria is one of the most diverse groups of bacteria known and these organisms have been characterized extensively by using different techniques. In this study, thirty lactic acid bacterial strains were isolated from soils chicken faeces and feathers. A total of nineteen isolates were obtained and by sequential screening for catalase activity and Gram-staining, eight were determined to be LAB out of which six were established to be homofermentative by the gel plug test. Five isolates were identified by use of the API 50CHL kit and four Lactobacilli strains and one Lactococci strain were selected to study their growth and lactic acid production profiles in a time course experiment. The Lactobacilli strains, both isolated from faeces, produced higher amounts of cells and lactic acid from soils as compared to the lactococci strain isolated from feathers. L (+)-lactic acid is the only optical isomer for use in pharmaceutical and food industries because is only adapted to assimilate this form. The optical isomers of lactic acid were examined by L (+) and D (-) lactate dehydrogenase kit. Lactobacilli strains produced combination of both optical isomers of lactic acid. Among them, Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei produced the low amount of D (-)-lactic (2%). The optimum rates of glucose for lactic acid production by Lactobacillus strains were 180 and 120 g/l for Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus paraplantarum, respectively. [less ▲]

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