References of "Coppola, G"
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See detailQuantification of Equid herpesvirus 5 DNA in clinical and necropsy specimens collected from a horse with equine multinodular pulmonary fibrosis
Marenzoni, M. L.; Passamonti, F.; Lepri, E. et al

in Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation (2011), 23

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See detailNeurophysiological tests and neuroimaging procedures in non-acute headache (2nd edition).
Sandrini, G.; Friberg, L.; Coppola, G. et al

in European Journal of Neurology (2011), 18

Background and purpose: A large number of instrumental investigations are used in patients with non-acute headache in both research and clinical fields. Although the literature has shown that most of ... [more ▼]

Background and purpose: A large number of instrumental investigations are used in patients with non-acute headache in both research and clinical fields. Although the literature has shown that most of these tools contributed greatly to increasing understanding of the pathogenesis of primary headache, they are of little or no value in the clinical setting. Methods: This paper provides an update of the 2004 EFNS guidelines and recommendations for the use of neurophysiological tools and neuroimaging procedures in non-acute headache (first edition). Even though the period since the publication of the first edition has seen an increase in the number of published papers dealing with this topic, the updated guidelines contain only minimal changes in the levels of evidence and grades of recommendation. Results: (i) Interictal EEG is not routinely indicated in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with headache. Interictal EEG is, however, indicated if the clinical history suggests a possible diagnosis of epilepsy (differential diagnosis). Ictal EEG could be useful in certain patients suffering from hemiplegic or basilar migraine. (ii) Recording evoked potentials is not recommended for the diagnosis of headache disorders. (iii) There is no evidence warranting recommendation of reflex responses or autonomic tests for the routine clinical examination of patients with headache. (iv) Manual palpation of pericranial muscles, with standardized palpation pressure, can be recommended for subdividing patient groups but not for diagnosis. Pain threshold measurements and EMG are not recommended as clinical diagnostic tests. (v) In adult and pediatric patients with migraine, with no recent change in attack pattern, no history of seizures, and no other focal neurological symptoms or signs, the routine use of neuroimaging is not warranted. In patients with trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia, neuroimaging should be carefully considered and may necessitate additional scanning of intracranial/cervical vasculature and/or the sellar/orbital/(para)nasal region. In patients with atypical headache patterns, a history of seizures and/or focal neurological symptoms or signs, MRI may be indicated. (vi) If attacks can be fully accounted for by the standard headache classification (IHS), a PET or SPECT scan will normally be of no further diagnostic value. Nuclear medical examinations of the cerebral circulation and metabolism can be carried out in subgroups of patients with headache for the diagnosis and evaluation of complications, when patients experience unusually severe attacks or when the quality or severity of attacks has changed. (vii) Transcranial Doppler examination is not helpful in headache diagnosis. Conclusion: Although many of the examinations described in the present guidelines are of little or no value in the clinical setting, most of the tools, including thermal pain thresholds and transcranial magnetic stimulation, have considerable potential for differential diagnostic evaluation as well as for the further exploration of headache pathophysiology and the effects of pharmacological treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in visual-evoked potential habituation induced by hyperventilation in migraine.
Coppola, G.; Curra, A.; Sava, Simona ULg et al

in Journal of Headache & Pain (2010)

Hyperventilation is often associated with stress, an established trigger factor for migraine. Between attacks, migraine is associated with a deficit in habituation to visual-evoked potentials (VEP) that ... [more ▼]

Hyperventilation is often associated with stress, an established trigger factor for migraine. Between attacks, migraine is associated with a deficit in habituation to visual-evoked potentials (VEP) that worsens just before the attack. Hyperventilation slows electroencephalographic (EEG) activity and decreases the functional response in the occipital cortex during visual stimulation. The neural mechanisms underlying deficient-evoked potential habituation in migraineurs remain unclear. To find out whether hyperventilation alters VEP habituation, we recorded VEPs before and after experimentally induced hyperventilation lasting 3 min in 18 healthy subjects and 18 migraine patients between attacks. We measured VEP P100 amplitudes in six sequential blocks of 100 sweeps and habituation as the change in amplitude over the six blocks. In healthy subjects, hyperventilation decreased VEP amplitude in block 1 and abolished the normal VEP habituation. In migraine patients, hyperventilation further decreased the already low block 1 amplitude and worsened the interictal habituation deficit. Hyperventilation worsens the habituation deficit in migraineurs possibly by increasing dysrhythmia in the brainstem-thalamo-cortical network. [less ▲]

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See detailInfezione da Equid herpesvirus (EHV_5) in 15 puledri
Marenzoni, M. L.; Coppola, G.; Maranesi, M. et al

in Ippologia (2010), 21(31-34),

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See detailAge-dependent prevalence of equid herpesvirus 5 infection
Marenzoni, M. L.; Coppola, G.; Maranesi, M. et al

in Veterinary Research Communications (2010), 34

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See detailHeadache: spreading from molecules to patients
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Coppola, G.

in Lancet Neurology (2010), 9

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See detailMitochondrial DNA haplogroups influence response to Riboflavin in Migraineurs
Di Lorenzo, C.; Coppola, G.; Santorelli, F. et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2009, January), 29(1),

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See detailMitochondrial DNA haplogroups influence the therapeutic response to riboflavin in migraineurs.
Di Lorenzo, C.; Pierelli, F.; Coppola, G. et al

in Neurology (2009), 72(18), 1588-94

OBJECTIVES: In migraine, an interictal reduction of mitochondrial energy metabolism and a preventive effect of high-dose riboflavin were reported. To explore the relation between the two, we tested if the ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: In migraine, an interictal reduction of mitochondrial energy metabolism and a preventive effect of high-dose riboflavin were reported. To explore the relation between the two, we tested if the therapeutic response to riboflavin is associated with specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups. We focused our attention on haplogroup H, which is known to differ from others in terms of energy metabolism. METHODS: Sixty-four migraineurs completed a 4-month open trial with riboflavin (400 mg QD) and were genotyped blindly for mtDNA haplogroups. RESULTS: Forty patients responded to riboflavin treatment and 24 were nonresponders. The mtDNA haplogroup H was found in 29 subjects (20 migraine without aura, 9 migraine with aura). Riboflavin responders were more numerous in the non-H group (67.5%). Conversely, nonresponders were mostly H (66.7%). The difference between the two groups was significant (chi(2) = 7.07; p = 0.01). The presence of aura had no influence on riboflavin's effectiveness (chi(2) = 0.113; p = 0.74) and was not associated with a particular haplogroup (chi(2) = 0.55; p = 0.46). CONCLUSIONS: In this pharmacogenetic study, riboflavin appears to be more effective in patients with migraine with non-H mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. The underlying mechanisms are unknown, but could be related to the association of haplogroup H with increased activity in complex I, which is a major target for riboflavin. Our results may have ethnic implications, since haplogroup H is chiefly found in the European population. [less ▲]

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See detailIs the cerebral cortex hyperexcitable or hyperresponsive in migraine?
Coppola, G.; Pierelli, F.; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2007), 27(12), 1429-1439

Although migraineurs appear in general to be hypersensitive to external stimuli, they maybe also have increased daytime sleepiness and complain of fatigue. Neurophisiological studies between attacks have ... [more ▼]

Although migraineurs appear in general to be hypersensitive to external stimuli, they maybe also have increased daytime sleepiness and complain of fatigue. Neurophisiological studies between attacks have shown that for a number of different sensory modalities the migrainous brain is characterised by a lack of habituation of evoked responses. Whether this is due to increased cortical hyperexcitability, possibly due to decreased inhibition, or to an abnormal responsivity of the cortex due a decreased preactivation level remains disputed. Studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation in particular have yielded contradictory results. We will review here the available data on cortical excitability obtained with different methodological approaches in patients over the migraine cycle. We will show that these data congruently indicate that the sensory cortices of migraineurs react excessively to repetitive, but not to single, stimuli and that the controversy above hyper- versus hypo-excitability is merely a semantic misunderstanding. Describing the migrainous brain as 'hyperresponsive' would fit most of the available data. Deciphering the precise cellular and molecular underpinnings of this hyperresponsivity remains a challenge for future research. We propose, as a working hypothesis, that a thalamo-cortical dysrhythmia might be the culprit. [less ▲]

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See detailInterictal abnormalities of gamma band activity in visual evoked responses in migraine: an indication of thalamocortical dysrhythmia?
Coppola, G.; Ambrosini, Anna; Di Clemente, L. et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2007), 27(12), 1360-1367

Between attacks, migraineurs lack habituation in standard visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Visual stimuli also evoke high-frequency oscillations in the gamma band range (GBOs, 20-35 Hz) assumed to be ... [more ▼]

Between attacks, migraineurs lack habituation in standard visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Visual stimuli also evoke high-frequency oscillations in the gamma band range (GBOs, 20-35 Hz) assumed to be generated both at subcortical (early GBOs) and cortical levels (late GBOs). The consecutive peaks of GBOs were analysed regarding amplitude and habituation in six successive blocks of 100 averaged pattern reversal (PR)-VEPs in healthy volunteers and interictally in migraine with (MA) or without aura patients. Amplitude of the two early GBO components in the first PR-VEP block was significantly increased in MA patients. There was a significant habituation deficit of the late GBO peaks in migraineurs. The increased amplitude of early GBOs could be related to the increased interictal visual discomfort reported by patients. We hypothesize that the hypofunctioning serotonergic pathways may cause, in line with the thalamocortical dysrhythmia theory, a functional disconnection of the thalamus leading to decreased intracortical lateral inhibition, which can induce dishabituation. [less ▲]

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See detailSearch for correlations between genotypes and electrophysiological patterns in migraine: the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and visual evoked potentials
Magis, Delphine ULg; Allena, M.; Coppola, G. et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2007), 27(10), 1142-1149

Interictally, migraineurs have on average a reduction in habituation of pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (PR-VEP) and in mitochondrial energy reserve. 5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase ... [more ▼]

Interictally, migraineurs have on average a reduction in habituation of pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (PR-VEP) and in mitochondrial energy reserve. 5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is involved in folate metabolism and its C677T polymorphism may be more prevalent in migraine. The aim of this study was to search in migraineurs for a correlation between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and the PR-VEP profile. PR-VEP were recorded in 52 genotyped migraine patients: 40 female, 24 without (MoA), 28 with aura (MA). Among them 21 had a normal genotype (CC), 18 were heterozygous (CT) and 13 homozygous (TT) for the MTHFR C677T polymorphism. Mean PR-VEP N1-P1 amplitude was significantly lower in CT compared with CC, and tended to be lower in TT with increasing age. The habituation deficit was significantly greater in CC compared with TT subjects. The correlation between the cortical preactivation level, as reflected by the VEP amplitude in the first block of averages, and habituation was stronger in CC than in CT or TT. The MTHFR C677T polymorphism could thus have an ambiguous role in migraine. On one hand, the better VEP habituation which is associated with its homozygosity, and possibly mediated by homocysteine derivatives increasing serotoninergic transmission, may protect the brain against overstimulation. On the other hand, MTHFR C677T homozygosity is linked to a reduction of grand average VEP amplitude with illness duration, which has been attributed to brain damage. [less ▲]

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See detailConditioning by high frequency visual stimuli of the visual evoked potential in healthy volunteers and migraineurs
Bolla, M.; Magis, Delphine ULg; Gerardy, P. et al

Poster (2007, August)

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See detailInhibition of the nociceptive R2 blink reflex after supraorbital or index finger stimulation is normal in migraine without aura between attacks
Coppola, G.; Di Clemente, L.; Fumal, Arnaud ULg et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2007), 27(7), 803-808

Coppola G, Di Clemente L, Fumal A, Magis D, De Pasqua V, Pierelli F & Schoenen J. Inhibition of the nociceptive R2 blink reflex after supraorbital or index finger stimulation is normal in migraine without ... [more ▼]

Coppola G, Di Clemente L, Fumal A, Magis D, De Pasqua V, Pierelli F & Schoenen J. Inhibition of the nociceptive R2 blink reflex after supraorbital or index finger stimulation is normal in migraine without aura between attacks. Cephalalgia 2007; 27:803-808. London. ISSN 0333-1024 In order to explore possible interictal brainstem dysfunctions in migraine, we have studied the R2 component of the nociceptive specific blink reflex (nBR) after conditioning by supraorbital or index finger stimuli in 14 untreated migraine without aura patients (MO) between attacks and in 15 healthy volunteers. We determined the R2 recovery curve at increasing inter-stimulus intervals between 50 and 600 ms. The nBR was conditioned by a paired supraorbital stimulus and, in another session, by an ipsilateral electrical shock delivered to the index finger. The R2 nBR recovery curves were normal in MO patients for both the supraorbital and peripheral conditioning. These results do not favour persistent interictal sensitization in the spinal trigeminal sensory system. They also suggest that the control exerted by descending brainstem pathways on medullary R2 interneurones is normal in migraine between attacks. [less ▲]

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See detailInterictal cognition in migraineurs: a study correlating psychometric and neurophysiological tests
Magis, Delphine ULg; Coppola, G.; Di Clemente, L. et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2007, June), 27(6), 714

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See detailInterictal habituation deficit of the nociceptive blink reflex: an endophenotypic marker for presymptomatic migraine?
Di Clemente, L.; Coppola, G.; Magis, Delphine ULg et al

in Brain : A Journal of Neurology (2007), 130(Pt 3), 765-770

Habituation of the nociception-specific blink reflex (nBR) is reduced interictally in migraine patients. This could be related to the habituation deficit of evoked cortical responses, a reproducible ... [more ▼]

Habituation of the nociception-specific blink reflex (nBR) is reduced interictally in migraine patients. This could be related to the habituation deficit of evoked cortical responses, a reproducible abnormality in migraine which has a familial character, or to central trigeminal sensitization due to repeated attacks. We compared nBR habituation in healthy volunteers devoid of personal or family history of migraine (HV), in migraine without aura patients (MO) and in healthy volunteers with a family history of migraine in first degree relatives (HV-F). We elicited the nBR by stimulating the right supraorbital region with a custom-built electrode in 16 MO between attacks, 15 HV and 14 HV-F. Habituation was measured as the percentage area-under-the-curve decrease in 10 consecutive blocks of five averaged rectified responses. nBR habituation was clearly reduced in MO and HV-F compared to HV. Percentage area under the curve decreased between the 1st and the 10th block by 55.01% in HV, 25.71% in MO (P = 0.001) and 26.73% in HV-F (P = 0.043). HV-F had the most pronounced abnormality with potentiation instead of habituation in the second block. We found a positive intraindividual correlation between attack frequency and habituation in MO (r = 0.621; P = 0.010). Migraine patients have interictally a deficient habituation of the nBR which is inversely related to attack frequency, suggesting that it is not due to trigeminal sensitization. Surprisingly, the most pronounced habituation deficit is found in asymptomatic individuals with a family history of migraine. Deficient nBR habituation could thus be a trait marker for the genetic predisposition to migraine. [less ▲]

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See detailInduction of long-lasting changes of visual cortex excitability by five daily sessions of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in healthy volunteers and migraine patients
Fumal, Arnaud ULg; Coppola, G.; Bohotin, V. et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2006), 26(2), 143-149

We have shown that in healthy volunteers (HV) one session of 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the visual cortex induces dishabituation of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) on ... [more ▼]

We have shown that in healthy volunteers (HV) one session of 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the visual cortex induces dishabituation of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) on average for 30 min, while in migraineurs one session of 10 Hz rTMS replaces the abnormal VEP potentiation by a normal habituation for 9 min. In the present study, we investigated whether repeated rTMS sessions (1 Hz in eight HV; 10 Hz in eight migraineurs) on 5 consecutive days can modify VEPs for longer periods. In all eight HV, the 1 Hz rTMS-induced dishabituation increased in duration over consecutive sessions and persisted between several hours (n = 4) and several weeks (n = 4) after the fifth session. In six out eight migraineurs, the normalization of VEP habituation by 10 Hz rTMS lasted longer after each daily stimulation but did not exceed several hours after the last session, except in two patients, where it persisted for 2 days and 1 week. Daily rTMS can thus induce long-lasting changes in cortical excitability and VEP habituation pattern. Whether this effect may be useful in preventative migraine therapy remains to be determined. [less ▲]

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See detailProton MRS findings in migraine patients during visual stimulation
da Silva, H. M.; Magis, Delphine ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2005, December), 25(12), 1196

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See detailLack of habituation of visual evoked gamma band oscillations in migraine patients between attacks
Coppola, G.; Ambrosini, A.; Di Clemente, L. et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2005, October), 25(10), 885

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See detailEfficacy of coenzyme Q10 in migraine prophylaxis: A randomized controlled trial
Sandor, P. S.; Di Clemente, L.; Coppola, G. et al

in Neurology (2005), 64(4), 713-715

Riboflavin, which improves energy metabolism similarly to coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), is effective in migraine prophylaxis. We compared CoQ10 (3 x 100 mg/day) and placebo in 42 migraine patients in a double ... [more ▼]

Riboflavin, which improves energy metabolism similarly to coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), is effective in migraine prophylaxis. We compared CoQ10 (3 x 100 mg/day) and placebo in 42 migraine patients in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. CoQ10 was superior to placebo for attack-frequency, headache-days and days-with-nausea in the third treatment month and well tolerated; 50%-responder-rate for attack frequency was 14.4% for placebo and 47.6% for CoQ10 (number-needed-to-treat: 3). CoQ10 is efficacious and well tolerated. [less ▲]

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