References of "Coppieters, Wouter"
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See detailThe impact of dopaminergic genes on inhibitory processes and cognitive control.
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Meyer, Christelle et al

Poster (2016, March 18)

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See detailA stop-gain in the laminin, alpha 3 gene causes recessive junctional epidermolysis bullosa in Belgian Blue cattle
Sartelet, Arnaud ULg; Harland, Chad ULg; Tamma, Nico ULg et al

in Animal Genetics (2015), 46(5), 566-570

Four newborn purebred Belgian Blue calves presenting a severe form of epidermolysis bullosa were recently referred to our heredo-surveillance platform. SNP array genotyping followed by autozygosity ... [more ▼]

Four newborn purebred Belgian Blue calves presenting a severe form of epidermolysis bullosa were recently referred to our heredo-surveillance platform. SNP array genotyping followed by autozygosity mapping located the causative gene in a 8.3-Mb interval on bovine chromosome 24. Combining information from (i) whole-genome sequencing of an affected calf, (ii) transcriptomic data from a panel of tissues and (iii) a list of functionally ranked positional candidates pinpointed a private G to A nucleotide substitution in the LAMA3 gene that creates a premature stop codon (p.Arg2609*) in exon 60, truncating 22% of the corresponding protein. The LAMA3 gene encodes the alpha 3 subunit of the heterotrimeric laminin-332, a key constituent of the lamina lucida that is part of the skin basement membrane connecting epidermis and dermis layers. Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in this gene are known to cause severe junctional epidermolysis bullosa in human, mice, horse, sheep and dog. Overall, our data strongly support the causality of the identified gene and mutation. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the use of the transmission disequilibrium test to detect pseudo-autosomal variants affecting traits with sex-limited expression
Elansary, Mahmoud ULg; Stinckens, Anneleen; Ahariz, Naïma ULg et al

in Animal Genetics (2015)

We herein describe the realization of a genome-wide association study for scrotal hernia and cryptorchidism in Norwegian and Belgian commercial pig populations. We have used the transmission ... [more ▼]

We herein describe the realization of a genome-wide association study for scrotal hernia and cryptorchidism in Norwegian and Belgian commercial pig populations. We have used the transmission disequilibrium test to avoid spurious associations due to population stratification. By doing so, we obtained genome-wide significant signals for both diseases with SNPs located in the pseudo-autosomal region in the vicinity of the pseudo-autosomal boundary. By further analyzing these signals, we demonstrate that the observed transmission disequilibria are artifactual. We determine that transmission bias at pseudo-autosomal markers will occur (i) when analyzing traits with sex-limited expression and (ii) when the allelic frequencies at the marker locus differ between X and Y chromosomes. We show that the bias is due to the fact that (i) sires will preferentially transmit the allele enriched on the Y (respectively X) chromosome to affected sons (respectively daughters) and (ii) dams will appear to preferentially transmit the allele enriched on the Y (respectively X) to affected sons (respectively daughters), as offspring inheriting the other allele are more likely to be non-informative. We define the conditions to mitigate these issues, namely by (i) extracting information from maternal meiosis only and (ii) ignoring trios for which sire and dam have the same heterozygous genotype. We show that by applying these rules to scrotal hernia and cryptorchidism, the pseudo-autosomal signals disappear, confirming their spurious nature. [less ▲]

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See detailPrioritizing likely causative genes in GWAS identified risk loci for immune-mediated inflammatory disorders using cell-type specific eQTL information.
Docampo Martínez, Elisa ULg; Fang, Ming ULg; Dmitrieva, Joelia Borisnova ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 05)

Background/Purpose: Immune-mediated inflammatory disorders (IMIDs) share many genetic risk factors. Pleiotropy may exist at different levels and most of the underlying mechanisms are still to be uncovered ... [more ▼]

Background/Purpose: Immune-mediated inflammatory disorders (IMIDs) share many genetic risk factors. Pleiotropy may exist at different levels and most of the underlying mechanisms are still to be uncovered. GWAS have identified hundreds of risk loci for IMIDs but causative genes have been identified in only a handful of cases. Recent fine-mapping efforts indicate that only a minority of risk variants are coding. This suggests that most risk variants will be regulatory hence affecting disease risk via eQTL effects. Methods: To aid in the identification of causative genes for IMIDs, we generated transcriptome information (HT12 arrays) for six blood cell types (CD4, CD8, CD19, CD14, CD15 and platelets) and intestinal biopsies at three anatomical locations (ileum, colon, rectum) for 350 healthy Caucasians. The same individuals were genotyped with SNP arrays interrogating > 700K variants, augmented by imputation from the 1KG project. To detect cis-eQTL we tested variants within 0.5 megabase windows centered on the tested probe. The nominal p-value of the best SNP within a cis-window was Sidak-corrected for the window-specific number of independent tests. The corresponding best, Sidak-corrected p-values for each probe were jointly used to estimate their respective false discovery rate.To identify likely causative genes in GWAS identified risk loci variants and also better understand pleiotropic effects, we (i) developed a method that quantifies the correlation between “disease association pattern” (DAP) and “eQTL association pattern” (EAP) and provides an empirical estimate of its significance, and (ii) evaluated the effect of fitting known risk variants as covariates in the eQTL analysis following Nica et al. (2010). We applied both approaches to celiac disease (CE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the second one to type one diabetes (T1D), multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriasis (PSO). Results: We detected > 16000 significant cis-eQTL, with a degree of sharing between cell types ranging from 38 to 90% highlighting the utility of our multi-tissue panel. GWAS variants were drivers of ciseQTL effects across the different tissues in 399 tests (23.6%), mostly in CD4 cells, and pinpointing 64 new gene-disease associations (3.7%). The number of shared loci and shared eQTL were highly correlated (rho=0.66).RA and SLE showed the highest degree of sharing. Conclusions: We identified new potential candidate genes for IMIDs and characterized pleiotropic effects through ciseQTL mapping in GWAS loci. These findings could shed a light on IMIDs pathogenesis and co-occurrence. Latest results will be presented. [less ▲]

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See detailHigher male than female recombination rate in cattle is controlled by genetic variants effective in both sexes
Kadri, Naveen Kumar ULg; Harland, Chad ULg; Coppieters, Wouter ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 05)

We herein study genetic recombination in three dairy cattle populations from France, New-Zealand and the Netherlands. We apply a new phasing algorithm extracting familial information suited for large half ... [more ▼]

We herein study genetic recombination in three dairy cattle populations from France, New-Zealand and the Netherlands. We apply a new phasing algorithm extracting familial information suited for large half-sib families to reconstruct haplotypes and detect cross-overs (CO). The software is robust to genotyping and map errors. We identify more than 2,000,000 CO events in sperm cells transmitted by 3008 sires to 94,603 offspring, and more than 500,000 CO events in oocytes transmitted by 11,497 cows to 25,390 offspring. When measured in identical family structures, the average number of CO in males (24.0) was found to be larger than in females (21.8). In males, recombination rates were higher closer to telomeres whereas in females, recombination rates dropped at both centromeres and telomeres (probably as a result of lower informativity). The heritability of the global recombination rate (GRR) was close to 0.20 in males and to 0.08 in females. Genetic correlation ranged from 0.38 to 0.69 depending on the population, indicating that shared variants are influencing GRR in both genders. Haplotype-based genome-wide association studies revealed four genome-wide significant QTL, including two previously identified ones (involving REC8 and RNF212). For all QTLs, there was a positive correlation between haplotype effects across sexes, ranging from 0.35 to 0.68. We selected two reference panels of respectively 122 and 215 bulls sequenced at cover > 15x to impute variants in the New-Zealand and French populations. All variants identified by next-generating sequencing in 5 Mb windows encompassing the QTL peaks were imputed with Beagle in order to perform a sequence-based association study. For three QTLs, we identified missense mutations in genes known to be involved in meiosis among the most significantly associated variants. These variants were perfectly associated with the haplotypes underlying the QTL effects. The variant identified in RNF212 had already been reported, whereas missense mutations in MLH3 (N408S) and HFM1 (S1189L) are new findings. Surprisingly, variants previously identified in REC8 did not capture the QTL effect whereas variants in RNF212B, PPP1R3E, BCL2L2, HOMEZ and PABPN1 had much stronger association with the phenotype. The three missense mutations were significant in both genders with two of them accounting for approximately 10% of the genetic variance in males (the allelic substitution effect being approximately equal to one additional CO per genome). Our results are very different from reports of recombination in other species. For instance, in human, recombination rate is higher in females, distinct variants affect recombination rate in males and females and the genetic correlation is close to 0 whereas in cattle, we observed a higher recombination rate in males controlled by shared variants effective in both sexes. [less ▲]

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See detailX-Linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) due to microduplications of chromosome Xq26 : A new disorder and implications for acromegaly
Trivellin, G; Daly, AF; Faucz, FR et al

in Abstract book - ENDO 2015 (2015, March)

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See detailScanning the genome for QTL affecting the recombination process in the male and female cattle germline
Kadri, Naveen Kumar ULg; Harland, Chad ULg; Coppieters, Wouter ULg et al

Poster (2015, February)

We herein study genetic recombination in three dairy cattle population from France, New-Zealand and The Netherlands. We apply a new phasing algorithm extracting familial information suited for large half ... [more ▼]

We herein study genetic recombination in three dairy cattle population from France, New-Zealand and The Netherlands. We apply a new phasing algorithm extracting familial information suited for large half-sib families to reconstruct haplotypes and detect cross-overs. The software is robust to genotyping errors and map errors (genome builts still contain errors for non-model organisms). We identify more than 2,000,000 cross-over events in sperm cells transmitted by 2942 sires to 94,049 offspring, and more than 500,000 cross-over events in oocytes transmitted by 10,943 cows to 23,850 offspring. The estimated number of cross-overs per gamete and its accuracy were influenced by the family structure (number of offsprings, parents and grand-parents genotyped). The average number of cross-overs in males (24.0) was larger than in females (21.8), even after correction for family structure. In males, recombination rates were higher closer to telomeres whereas in females, recombination rates dropped at both centromeres and telomeres (probably as a result of lower informativity). The heritability of the global recombination rate was close to 0.20 in males and to 0.10 in females and the genetic correlation was ~0.70, indicating that common genes are influencing both traits. Genome-wide association studies clearly confirmed QTL located close to REC8 and RNF212 in males. The QTL associated to REC8 was also detected in females and there was a positive correlation between QTL effects in males and females. The QTL associated to REC8 accounted for ~10% of the genetic variance in both males and females. [less ▲]

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See detailSelection in action: dissecting the molecular underpinnings of the increasing muscle mass of Belgian Blue Cattle
Druet, Tom ULg; Ahariz, Naïma ULg; Cambisano, Nadine ULg et al

Conference (2014, October 17)

Belgian Blue cattle are famous for their exceptional muscular development or “double-muscling”. This defining feature emerged following the fixation of a loss-of-function variant in the myostatin gene in ... [more ▼]

Belgian Blue cattle are famous for their exceptional muscular development or “double-muscling”. This defining feature emerged following the fixation of a loss-of-function variant in the myostatin gene in the eighties. Since then, sustained selection has further increased muscle mass of Belgian Blue animals to a comparable extent. In the present paper, we study the genetic determinants of this second wave of muscle growth. A scan for selective sweeps did not reveal the recent fixation of another allele with major effect on muscularity. However, a genome-wide association study identified two genome-wide significant and three suggestive QTLs affecting specific muscle groups and jointly explaining 8-21% of the heritability. The top two QTL are caused by presumably recent mutations on unique haplotypes that have rapidly risen in frequency in the population. While one appears on its way to fixation, the ascent of the other is compromised as the underlying MRC2 mutation causes crooked tail syndrome in homozygotes. Genomic prediction models indicate that the residual additive variance is largely polygenic. Contrary to complex traits in humans which have a near-exclusively polygenic architecture, muscle mass in beef cattle (as other production traits under directional selection), appears to be controlled by (i) a handful of recent mutations with large effect that rapidly sweep through the population, and (ii) a large number of presumably older variants with very small effects that rise slowly in the population (polygenic adaptation). [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of molecular components of the host-microbiota-connectome by using "Omics Approaches"
Mariman, Rob ULg; Coppieters, Wouter ULg; Elansary, Mahmoud ULg et al

Poster (2014, April 24)

The host immune system plays an critical role in maintaining homeostasis with resident microbial communities, therefore ensuring that the complex symbiotic relationship is maintained. At the same time ... [more ▼]

The host immune system plays an critical role in maintaining homeostasis with resident microbial communities, therefore ensuring that the complex symbiotic relationship is maintained. At the same time, resident microbiota contribute to host nutrition and energy balance and to the development or maintenance of a robust immune system. Dysbiosis of the microbiota is associated with various immunological disorders, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Both genetic and environmental factors are implicated in this disturbance; however, the relative contributions of these two factors, and the mechanism by which they interact remain unclear. Recently, we started a project that aims to identify molecular components of the hostmicrobiota-connectome by taking advantage of common variation in – on the one hand – the genome, transcriptome and metabolome of the host, and – on the other hand – the composition of its gut microbiota. We will take advantage of the already established CEDAR cohort that provides integrated genetic (SNP genotypes) and transcriptome data (circulating immune cells subset, as well as samples from various anatomical locations in the intestine). We will further enrich the dataset in this cohort with metabolome (plasma), and gut microbiota data (16srRNA sampled at the ileum, colon, and rectum). The CEDAR cohort is composed of healthy individuals and is therefore more suitable to study effect of common risk variants than (IBD) patients, since analysis of samples from patients suffering from active inflammation may only give insight in ongoing patho-physiological processes, that are likely to mask the primum movens events. Next, we will study the overlap between the identified components of the HMC network identified and the ~160 GWAS-identified risk loci for IBD. We anticipate to reveal novel connections between the microbiota and IBD by this integrative “omics” approach, thereby shedding new light on the pathogenesis of IBD. Latest results will be presented with respect to the microbiota composition of from different anatomical locations in the intestine using the V2 and V5-6 regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA. [less ▲]

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See detailA missense mutation accelerating the gating of the lysosomal Cl-/H+-exchanger ClC-7/Ostm1 causes osteopetrosis with gingival hamartomas in cattle.
Sartelet, Arnaud ULg; Stauber, Tobias; Coppieters, Wouter ULg et al

in Disease Models & Mechanisms (2014), 7

Chloride/proton exchange by the lysosomal anion transporter ClC-7/Ostm1 is of pivotal importance for the physiology of lysosomes and bone resorption. Mice lacking either ClC-7 or Ostm1 develop a lysosomal ... [more ▼]

Chloride/proton exchange by the lysosomal anion transporter ClC-7/Ostm1 is of pivotal importance for the physiology of lysosomes and bone resorption. Mice lacking either ClC-7 or Ostm1 develop a lysosomal storage disease and mutations in either protein have been found to underlie osteopetrosis in mice and humans. Some human disease-causing CLCN7 mutations accelerate the usually slow voltage-dependent gating of ClC-7/Ostm1. However, it has remained unclear whether the fastened kinetics is indeed causative for the disease. Here we identified and characterized a new deleterious ClC-7 mutation in Belgian Blue Cattle with a severe symptomatology including peri-natal lethality and in most cases gingival hamartomas. By autozygosity mapping and genome-wide sequencing we found a handful of candidate variants, including a cluster of three private SNPs causing the substitution of a conserved tyrosine in the CBS2 domain of ClC-7 by glutamine. The case for ClC-7 was strengthened by subsequent examination of affected calves that revealed severe osteopetrosis. The Y750Q mutation largely preserved the lysosomal localization and assembly of ClC-7/Ostm1, but drastically accelerated its activation by membrane depolarization. These data provide first evidence that accelerated ClC-7/Ostm1 gating per se is deleterious, highlighting a physiological importance of the slow voltage-activation of ClC-7/Ostm1 in lysosomal function and bone resorption. [less ▲]

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See detailSelection in action: dissecting the molecular underpinnings of the increasing muscle mass of Belgian Blue Cattle.
Druet, Tom ULg; Ahariz, Naima; Cambisano, Nadine et al

in BMC genomics (2014), 15(1), 796

BACKGROUND: Belgian Blue cattle are famous for their exceptional muscular development or "double-muscling". This defining feature emerged following the fixation of a loss-of-function variant in the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Belgian Blue cattle are famous for their exceptional muscular development or "double-muscling". This defining feature emerged following the fixation of a loss-of-function variant in the myostatin gene in the eighties. Since then, sustained selection has further increased muscle mass of Belgian Blue animals to a comparable extent. In the present paper, we study the genetic determinants of this second wave of muscle growth. RESULTS: A scan for selective sweeps did not reveal the recent fixation of another allele with major effect on muscularity. However, a genome-wide association study identified two genome-wide significant and three suggestive quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting specific muscle groups and jointly explaining 8-21% of the heritability. The top two QTL are caused by presumably recent mutations on unique haplotypes that have rapidly risen in frequency in the population. While one appears on its way to fixation, the ascent of the other is compromised as the likely underlying MRC2 mutation causes crooked tail syndrome in homozygotes. Genomic prediction models indicate that the residual additive variance is largely polygenic. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to complex traits in humans which have a near-exclusive polygenic architecture, muscle mass in beef cattle (as other production traits under directional selection), appears to be controlled by (i) a handful of recent mutations with large effect that rapidly sweep through the population, and (ii) a large number of presumably older variants with very small effects that rise slowly in the population (polygenic adaptation). [less ▲]

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See detailGigantism and Acromegaly Due to Xq26 Microduplications and GPR101 Mutation.
Trivellin, Giampaolo; Daly, Adrian ULg; Faucz, Fabio R. et al

in The New England journal of medicine (2014)

Background Increased secretion of growth hormone leads to gigantism in children and acromegaly in adults; the genetic causes of gigantism and acromegaly are poorly understood. Methods We performed ... [more ▼]

Background Increased secretion of growth hormone leads to gigantism in children and acromegaly in adults; the genetic causes of gigantism and acromegaly are poorly understood. Methods We performed clinical and genetic studies of samples obtained from 43 patients with gigantism and then sequenced an implicated gene in samples from 248 patients with acromegaly. Results We observed microduplication on chromosome Xq26.3 in samples from 13 patients with gigantism; of these samples, 4 were obtained from members of two unrelated kindreds, and 9 were from patients with sporadic cases. All the patients had disease onset during early childhood. Of the patients with gigantism who did not carry an Xq26.3 microduplication, none presented before the age of 5 years. Genomic characterization of the Xq26.3 region suggests that the microduplications are generated during chromosome replication and that they contain four protein-coding genes. Only one of these genes, GPR101, which encodes a G-protein-coupled receptor, was overexpressed in patients' pituitary lesions. We identified a recurrent GPR101 mutation (p.E308D) in 11 of 248 patients with acromegaly, with the mutation found mostly in tumors. When the mutation was transfected into rat GH3 cells, it led to increased release of growth hormone and proliferation of growth hormone-producing cells. Conclusions We describe a pediatric disorder (which we have termed X-linked acrogigantism [X-LAG]) that is caused by an Xq26.3 genomic duplication and is characterized by early-onset gigantism resulting from an excess of growth hormone. Duplication of GPR101 probably causes X-LAG. We also found a recurrent mutation in GPR101 in some adults with acromegaly. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others.). [less ▲]

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See detailA splice-acceptor site variant in the bovine PIGH gene causes glycosylphosphatidyl inositol deficiency and lethal arthrogryposis syndrome.
Sartelet, Arnaud ULg; Li, Wanbo; Pailhoux Eric et al

in Bayrou, Calixte; Cabaraux, Jean-François; Delguste, Catherine (Eds.) et al Proccedings of the 3rd Scientific Meetingof the Faculty of Veterinary Medecine (2013, October 11)

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See detailMethod for identifying cows with mastitis by bulk genotyping of tank milk.
Georges, Michel ULg; Coppieters, Wouter ULg; Blard, Grégoire

Patent (2013)

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See detailMethod for identifying cows with mastitis by bulk genotyping of tank milk.
Georges, Michel ULg; Blard, Grégoire; Coppieters, Wouter ULg

Patent (2013)

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