References of "Coosemans, Nadine"
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See detailInactivation of genes coding for mitochondrial Nd7 and Nd9 complex I subunits in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Impact of complex I loss on respiration and energetic metabolism.
Massoz, Simon; Larosa, Véronique ULg; Plancke, Charlotte et al

in Mitochondrion (2013)

In Chlamydomonas, unlike in flowering plants, genes coding for Nd7 (NAD7/49kDa) and Nd9 (NAD9/30kDa) core subunits of mitochondrial respiratory-chain complex I are nucleus-encoded. Both genes possess all ... [more ▼]

In Chlamydomonas, unlike in flowering plants, genes coding for Nd7 (NAD7/49kDa) and Nd9 (NAD9/30kDa) core subunits of mitochondrial respiratory-chain complex I are nucleus-encoded. Both genes possess all the features that facilitate their expression and proper import of the polypeptides in mitochondria. By inactivating their expression by RNA interference or insertional mutagenesis, we show that both subunits are required for complex I assembly and activity. Inactivation of complex I impairs the cell growth rate, reduces the respiratory rate, leads to lower intracellular ROS production and lower expression of ROS scavenging enzymes, and is associated to a diminished capacity to concentrate CO2 without compromising photosynthetic capacity. [less ▲]

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See detailReconstruction of a human mitochondrial complex I mutation in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas.
Larosa, Véronique ULg; Coosemans, Nadine ULg; Motte, Patrick ULg et al

in Plant Journal (The) (2012), 70

Defects in complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) are the most frequent cause of human respiratory disorders. The pathogenicity of a given human mitochondrial mutation can be difficult to demonstrate ... [more ▼]

Defects in complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) are the most frequent cause of human respiratory disorders. The pathogenicity of a given human mitochondrial mutation can be difficult to demonstrate because the mitochondrial genome harbors large numbers of polymorphic base changes that have no pathogenic significance. In addition, mitochondrial mutations are usually found in the heteroplasmic state, which could hide the biochemical effect of the mutation. We propose that the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas could be used to study such mutations because (1) respiratory-deficient mutants are viable and mitochondrial mutations are found in the homoplasmic state, (2) transformation of the mitochondrial genome is feasible, (3) Chlamydomonas complex I is close to that of humans. To illustrate that, we have introduced a Leu157Pro substitution in the Chlamydomonas ND4 subunit of complex I of two different recipient strains by biolistic transformation, demonstrating that site-directed mutagenesis of the Chlamydomonas mitochondrial genome is possible. This substitution did not lead to any respiratory enzyme defect when it is present in the heteroplasmic state in a patient presenting chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. When present in the homoplasmic state in the alga, the mutation does not prevent the assembly of the 950 kDa whole complex I which conserves nearly all the NADH dehydrogenase activity of the peripheral arm. However, the NADH:duroquinone oxidoreductase activity is strongly reduced, suggesting that the substitution could affect ubiquinone fixation to the membrane domain. The in vitro defects are correlated in vivo with a decrease in dark respiration and growth rate. [less ▲]

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See detailChlamydomonas can play a role in the study of a heteroplasmic human mitochondrial mutation
Larosa, Véronique ULg; Coosemans, Nadine ULg; Bonnefoy, Nathalie et al

Scientific conference (2011)

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See detailAtypical subunit composition of the chlorophycean mitochondrial F1FO ATP synthase and role of Asa7 protein in stability and oligomycin resistance of the enzyme.
Lapaille, Marie; Escobar-Ramirez, Adelma; Degand, Hervé et al

in Molecular Biology and Evolution (2010), 27(7), 1630-1644

Background. In yeast, mammals, and land plants, mitochondrial F(1)F(O) ATP synthase (complex V) is a remarkable enzymatic machinery which comprises about 15 conserved subunits. Peculiar among eukaryotes ... [more ▼]

Background. In yeast, mammals, and land plants, mitochondrial F(1)F(O) ATP synthase (complex V) is a remarkable enzymatic machinery which comprises about 15 conserved subunits. Peculiar among eukaryotes, complex V from Chlamydomonadales algae (order of chlorophycean class) has an atypical subunit composition of its peripheral stator and dimerization module, with 9 subunits of unknown evolutionary origin (Asa subunits). In vitro, this enzyme exhibits an increased stability of its dimeric form, and in vivo, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells are insensitive to oligomycins, which are potent inhibitors of proton translocation through the F(O) moiety. Methodology/Principal Findings. In this work, we showed that the atypical features of the Chlamydomonadales complex V enzyme are shared by the other chlorophycean orders. By biochemical and in silico analyses, we detected several atypical Asa subunits in Scenedesmus obliquus (Sphaeropleales) and Chlorococcum ellipsoideum (Chlorococcales). In contrast, Complex V has a canonical subunit composition in other classes of Chlorophytes (Trebouxiophyceae, Prasinophyceae, and Ulvophyceae) as well as in Streptophytes (land plants) and in Rhodophytes (red algae). Growth, respiration and ATP levels in Chlorophyceae were also barely affected by oligomycin concentrations that affect representatives of the other classes of Chlorophytes. We finally studied the function of the Asa7 atypical subunit by using RNA interference in C. reinhardtii. Although the loss of Asa7 subunit has no impact on cell bioenergetics or mitochondrial structures, it destabilizes in vitro the enzyme dimeric form and renders growth, respiration and ATP level sensitive to oligomycins. Conclusions/Significance. Altogether, our results suggest that the loss of canonical components of the Complex V stator happened at the root of chlorophycean lineage and was accompanied by the recruitment of novel polypeptides. Such a massive modification of Complex V stator features might have conferred novel properties, including the stabilization of the enzyme dimeric form and the shielding of the proton channel. In these respects, we discuss an evolutionary scenario for F(1)F(O) ATP synthase in the whole green lineage (i.e. Chlorophyta and Streptophyta). [less ▲]

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See detailKnock-down of the COX3 and COX17 gene expression of cytochrome c oxidase in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.
Remacle, Claire ULg; Coosemans, Nadine ULg; Jans, Frédéric ULg et al

in Plant Molecular Biology (2010), 74(3), 223-2363

The COX3 gene encodes a core subunit of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) whereas the COX17 gene encodes a chaperone delivering copper to the enzyme. Mutants of these two genes were isolated ... [more ▼]

The COX3 gene encodes a core subunit of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) whereas the COX17 gene encodes a chaperone delivering copper to the enzyme. Mutants of these two genes were isolated by RNA interference in the microalga Chlamydomonas. The COX3 mRNA was completely lacking in the cox3-RNAi mutant and no activity and assembly of complex IV were detected. The cox17-RNAi mutant presented a reduced level of COX17 mRNA, a reduced activity of the cytochrome c oxidase but no modification of its amount. The cox3-RNAi mutant had only 40% of the wild-type rate of dark respiration which was cyanide-insensitive. The mutant presented a 60% decrease of H(2)O(2) production in the dark compared to wild type, which probably accounts for a reduced electron leakage by respiratory complexes III and IV. In contrast, the cox17-RNAi mutant showed no modification of respiration and of H(2)O(2) production in the dark but a two to threefold increase of H(2)O(2) in the light compared to wild type and the cox3-RNAi mutant. The cox17-RNAi mutant was more sensitive to cadmium than the wild-type and cox3-RNAi strains. This suggested that besides its role in complex IV assembly, Cox17 could have additional functions in the cell such as metal detoxification or Reactive Oxygen Species protection or signaling. Concerning Cox3, its role in Chlamydomonas complex IV is similar to that of other eukaryotes although this subunit is encoded in the nuclear genome in the alga contrary to the situation found in all other organisms. [less ▲]

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See detailThe ARG9 Gene Encodes the Plastid-Resident N-Acetyl Ornithine Aminotransferase in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii
Remacle, Claire ULg; Cline, Sara; Boutaffala, Layla ULg et al

in Eukaryotic Cell (2009), 8(9), 1460-1463

Here we report the characterization of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii gene ARG9, encoding the plastid resident N-acetyl ornithine aminotransferase, which is involved in arginine synthesis. Integration of ... [more ▼]

Here we report the characterization of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii gene ARG9, encoding the plastid resident N-acetyl ornithine aminotransferase, which is involved in arginine synthesis. Integration of an engineered ARG9 cassette in the plastid chromosome of the nuclear arg9 mutant restores arginine prototrophy. This suggests that ARG9 could be used as a new selectable marker for plastid transformation. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh-efficiency biolistic transformation of Chlamydomonas mitochondria can be used to insert mutations in complex I genes
Remacle, Claire ULg; Cardol, Pierre ULg; Coosemans, Nadine ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2006), 103(12), 4771-4776

Mitochondrial transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been optimized by using a particle-gun device and cloned mitochondrial DNA or PCR fragments. A respiratory-deficient strain lacking a 1.2-kb ... [more ▼]

Mitochondrial transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been optimized by using a particle-gun device and cloned mitochondrial DNA or PCR fragments. A respiratory-deficient strain lacking a 1.2-kb mitochondrial DNA region including the left telomere and part of the cob gene could be rescued as well as a double-frameshift mutant in the mitochondrial cox1 and nd1 genes. High transformation efficiency has been achieved (100-250 transformants per microgram of DNA), the best results being obtained with linearized plasmid DNA. Molecular analysis of the transformants suggests that the right telomere sequence can be copied to reconstruct the left telomere by recombination. In addition, both nondeleterious and deleterious mutations could be introduced. Myxothiazol-resistant transformants have been created by introducing a nucleotide substitution into the cob gene. Similarly, an in-frame deletion of 23 codons has been created in the nd4 mitochondrial gene of both the deleted and frameshift recipient strains. These 23 codons are believed to encode the first transmembrane segment of the ND4 protein. This Delta nd4 mutation causes a misassembly of complex 1, with the accumulation of a subcomplex that is 250-kDa smaller than the wild-type complex 1. The availability of efficient mitochondrial transformation in Chlamydomonas provides an invaluable tool for the study of mitochondrial biogenesis and, more specifically, for site-directed mutagenesis of mitochondrially encoded subunits of complex 1, of special interest because the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whose mitochondrial genome can be manipulated virtually at will, is lacking complex 1. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of the alternative oxidase Aox1 gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Role of the nitrogen source on the expression of a reporter gene under the control of the Aox1 promoter
Baurain, Denis ULg; Dinant, Monique; Coosemans, Nadine ULg et al

in Plant Physiology (2003), 131(3), 1418-1430

In higher plants, various developmental and environmental conditions enhance expression of the alternative oxidase (AOX), whereas its induction in fungi is mainly dependent on cytochrome pathway ... [more ▼]

In higher plants, various developmental and environmental conditions enhance expression of the alternative oxidase (AOX), whereas its induction in fungi is mainly dependent on cytochrome pathway restriction and triggering by reactive oxygen species. The AOX of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is encoded by two different genes, the Aox1 gene being much more transcribed than Aox2. To analyze the transcriptional regulation of Aox1, we have fused its 1.4-kb promoter region to the promoterless arylsulfatase (Ars) reporter gene and measured ARS enzyme activities in transformants carrying the chimeric construct. We show that the Aox1 promoter is generally unresponsive to a number of known AOX inducers, including stress agents, respiratory inhibitors, and metabolites, possibly because the AOX activity is constitutively high in the alga. In contrast, the Aox1 expression is strongly dependent on the nitrogen source, being down-regulated by ammonium and stimulated by nitrate. Inactivation of nitrate reductase leads to a further increase of expression. The stimulation by nitrate also occurs at the AOX protein and respiratory levels. A deletion analysis of the Aox1 promoter region demonstrates that a short upstream segment (-253 to +59 with respect to the transcription start site) is sufficient to ensure gene expression and regulation, but that distal elements are required for full gene expression. The observed pattern of AOX regulation points to the possible interaction between chloroplast and mitochondria in relation to a potential increase of photogenerated ATP when nitrate is used as a nitrogen source. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of two genes encoding the mitochondrial alternative oxidase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii
Dinant, Monique; Baurain, Denis ULg; Coosemans, Nadine ULg et al

in Current Genetics (2001), 39(2), 101-108

Two cDNA clones (AOX1 and AOX2) and the corresponding genes encoding the alternative oxidases (AOXs) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were isolated and sequenced. The cDNAs, AOX1 and AOX2, contained open ... [more ▼]

Two cDNA clones (AOX1 and AOX2) and the corresponding genes encoding the alternative oxidases (AOXs) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were isolated and sequenced. The cDNAs, AOX1 and AOX2, contained open reading frames (ORFs) encoding putative proteins of 360 amino acids and 347 amino acids, respectively. For each of the ORFs, a potential mitochondrial-targeting sequence was found in the 5'-end regions. In comparison to AOX enzymes from plants and fungi, the predicted amino acid sequences of the ORFs showed their highest degree of identity with proteins from Aspergillus niger (38.1% and 37.2%) and Ajellomyces capsulatus (37% and 34.9%). Several residues supposed either to be Fe ligands or to be involved in the ubiquinol-binding site were fully conserved in both C. reinhardtii putative AOX proteins. In contrast, a cysteine residue conserved in the sequences of all higher plants and probably involved in the regulation of the enzyme activity was missing both from the AOX1 and AOX2 amino acid sequences and from protein sequences from various other microorganisms. The transcriptional expression of the AOX1 and AOX2 genes in wild-type cells and in mutant cells deficient in mitochondrial complex III activity was also investigated. [less ▲]

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