References of "Cooper, C"
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See detailClinical usefulness of bone turnover marker concentrations in osteoporosis.
Morris, H. A.; Eastell, R.; Jorgesen, N. R. et al

in Clinica Chimica Acta (in press)

Current evidence continues to support the potential for bone turnover markers (BTM) to provide clinically useful information particularly for monitoring the efficacy of osteoporosis treatment. Many of the ... [more ▼]

Current evidence continues to support the potential for bone turnover markers (BTM) to provide clinically useful information particularly for monitoring the efficacy of osteoporosis treatment. Many of the limitations identified earlier remain, principally in regard to the relationship between BTM and incident fractures. Important data are now available on reference interval values for CTX and PINP across a range of geographic regions and for individual clinical assays. An apparent lack of comparability between current clinical assays for CTX has become evident indicating the possible limitations of combining such data for meta-analyses. Harmonization of units for reporting serum/plasma CTX (ng/L) and PINP (mug/L) is recommended. The development of international collaborations continues with an important initiative to combine BTM results from clinical trials in osteoporosis in a meta-analysis and an assay harmonization program are likely to be beneficial. It is possible that knowledge derived from clinical studies can further enhance fracture risk estimation tools with inclusion of BTM together with other independent risk factors. Further data of the relationships between the clinical assays for CTX and PINP as well as physiological and pre-analytical factors contributing to variability in BTM concentrations are required. [less ▲]

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See detailA review of glucosamine for knee osteoarthritis: why patented crystalline glucosamine sulfate shoulf be differentiated from the other glucosamines to maximize clinical outcomes
Kucharz, E.J.; Kovalenko, V.; Szanto, S. et al

in Current Medical Research & Opinion (2016), 32(6), 997-1004

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) treatment algorithm for knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommends symptomatic slow-acting drugs for ... [more ▼]

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) treatment algorithm for knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommends symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs) first line for the medium to long term management of OA, due to their ability to control pain, improve function, and delay joint structural changes. Among SYSADOAs, glucosamine is probably the most widely used intervention. In the present review of glucosamine for knee OA, we have investigated whether the evidence is greater for the patented crystalline glucosamine sulfate (pCGS) preparation (Rottapharm/Meda) than for other glucosamine formulations. Glucosamine is actually widely available in many forms, as the prescription-grade pCGS preparation, generic and over-the-counter formulations of glucosamine sulfate (GS) and food supplements containing glucosamine hydrochloride (GH), which vary substantially in molecular form, pharmaceutical formulation and dose regimens. Only pCGS is given as a highly bioavailable once daily dose (1500mg) with a proven pharmacological effect. pCGS consistently reaches the plasma levels of around 10 lM required to inhibit interleukin-1 induced expression of genes involved in the pathophysiology of joint inflammation and tissue destruction, compared with sub-therapeutic levels achieved with GH. It is evident, from careful consideration of the evidence base, that only the pCGS formulation of glucosamine reliably provides an effect size on pain that is higher than that of paracetamol and equivalent to that provided by non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. In comparison, the effect size on pain of non-crystalline GS preparations and GH from randomized controlled trials is repeatedly demonstrated to be zero. In addition, there is evidence that chronic administration of pCGS has disease-modifying effects, with a reduction in the need for total joint replacement surgery lasting for at least 5 years after treatment cessation. Consequently, the pCGS preparation (Rottapharm/Meda) is the logical choice, with demonstrated medium-term control of pain and lasting impact on disease progression. [less ▲]

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See detailEnglish translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the SarQuoL® questionnaire.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Edwards, M.; Dennison, E.M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2016, April), 27(Supplement 1), 221-222

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See detailBalancing benefits and risks of glucocorticoids in rheumatic diseases and other inflammatory joint disorders: new insights from emerging data. An expert consensus paper from the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO)
Cooper, C.; Bardin, T.; Brandi, M.L. et al

in Aging Clinical and Experimental Research (2016), 28(1), 1-16

Purpose: This consensus review article considers the question of whether glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is still relevant in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, with a particular focus on rheumatoid ... [more ▼]

Purpose: This consensus review article considers the question of whether glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is still relevant in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, with a particular focus on rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and whether its side effects can be adequately managed. Recent basic and clinical research on the molecular, cellular and clinical effects of GCs have considerably advanced our knowledge in this field. An overview of the subject seems appropriate. Methods: This review is the result of a multidisciplinary expert working group, organised by European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis. The recent literature was surveyed and the salient evidence synthetized. Results: The pathophysiological basis of RA (and other inflammatory rheumatic diseases) now strongly implicates the adaptive immune system in addition to innate mechanisms. The molecular effect of GCs and differential GC sensitivity is better understood, although exploiting this knowledge is still in its infancy. The newer treatment strategies of early and aggressive control of RA have greatly improved clinical outcomes, but improvements are still possible. Newer targeted anti-inflammatory drugs have made an important impact, yet they too are associated with numerous side effects. Discussion: Short durations of moderate doses of GCs are generally well tolerated and have a positive benefit/risk ratio. Patients should be assessed for fracture risk and bone preserving agents and be prescribed calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Conclusions: Within a strategy of a disease modifying approach to inflammatory disease, combination therapy including a GC is effective approach. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of caldium supplementation in healthy musculoskeletal ageing - An expert consensus meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis ans Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the International Foundation for Osteoporosis (IOF)
Harvey, N.C.; Biver, E.; Kaufman, J.-M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2016), First online

Abstract The place of calcium supplementation, with or without concomitant vitamin D supplementation, has been much debated in terms of both efficacy and safety. There have been numerous trials and meta ... [more ▼]

Abstract The place of calcium supplementation, with or without concomitant vitamin D supplementation, has been much debated in terms of both efficacy and safety. There have been numerous trials and meta-analyses of supplementation for fracture reduction, and associations with risk of myocardial infarction have been suggested in recent years. In this report, the product of an expert consensus meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the International Foundation for Osteoporosis (IOF), we review the evidence for the value of calcium supplementation, with or without vitamin D supplementation, for healthy musculoskeletal ageing.We conclude that (1) calcium and vitamin D supplementation leads to a modest reduction in fracture risk, although population-level intervention has not been shown to be an effective public health strategy; (2) supplementation with calcium alone for fracture reduction is not supported by the literature; (3) side effects of calcium supplementation include renal stones and gastrointestinal symptoms; (4) vitamin D supplementation, rather than calcium supplementation, may reduce falls risk; and (5) assertions of increased cardiovascular risk consequent to calciumsupplementation are not convincingly supported by current evidence. In conclusion, we recommend, on the basis of the current evidence, that calcium supplementation, with concomitant vitamin D supplementation, is supported for patients at high risk of calcium and vitamin D insufficiency, and in those who are receiving treatment for osteoporosis. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh Kellgren-Lawrence Grade and Bone Marrow Lesions Predict Worsening Rates of Radiographic Joint Space Narrowing; The SEKOIA Study
Edwards, M.H.; Parsons, C.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Journal of Rheumatology (2016), 43(3), 657-65

Objective. Determinants of radiographic progression in osteoarthritis (OA) are poorly understood. We investigated which features on baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acted as predictors of change ... [more ▼]

Objective. Determinants of radiographic progression in osteoarthritis (OA) are poorly understood. We investigated which features on baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acted as predictors of change in joint space width (JSW). Methods. A total of 559 men and women over the age of 50 years with clinical knee OA [Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade 2-3] were recruited to the placebo arm of the SEKOIA study (98 centers; 18 countries). Minimal tibiofemoral joint space and KL grade on plain radiograph of the knee were assessed at baseline and at yearly followup up to 3 years. In a subset, serial knee MRI examinations were performed. Individuals with a bone marrow lesion (BML) ≥ grade 2 at the tibiofemoral joint at baseline were classified as BML-positive. Relationships between change in JSW and risk factors were assessed using linear regression. Results. The mean age of study participants was 62.8 (SD 7.5) years and 73% were female; 38.6% had BML. Mean baseline JSW was 3.65 mm. This reduced by 0.18 (0.30) mm/year in men and 0.13 (0.23) mm/year in women. Those with BML had a significantly higher rate of annualized change in JSW; this relationship remained robust after adjustment for age, sex, and baseline KL grade [β = –0.10 (95% CI –0.18, –0.02) mm/yr]. Age, sex, baseline KL grade, and other MRI findings did not influence the rate of change in JSW. Conclusion. The rate of change in JSW was similar in men and women. BML on knee MRI predicted the rate of radiographic change in JSW. This relationship was independent of age, sex, and baseline KL grade. (First Release January 15 2016; J Rheumatol 2016;43:657–65; doi:10.3899/jrheum.150053) [less ▲]

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See detailClinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease
SMOLEN, J.S.; COLLAUD BASSET, S.; BOERS, M. et al

in Annals of Rheumatic Diseases (2016), 75

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial ... [more ▼]

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft ‘Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for the treatment of RA’ released by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Special emphasis was placed by the group on the development of new drugs for the treatment of early RA. In the absence of a clear definition of early RA, it was suggested that clinical investigations in this condition were conducted in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs naïve patients with no more than 1 year disease duration. The expert group recommended using an appropriate improvement in disease activity (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or Simplified/Clinical Disease Activity Index (SDAI/CDAI) response criteria) or low disease activity (by any score) as primary endpoints, with ACR/European League Against Rheumatism remission as a secondary endpoint. Finally, as compelling evidence showed that the Disease Acrivity Score using 28-joint counts (DAS28) might not provide a reliable definition of remission, or sometimes even low disease activity, the group suggested replacing DAS28 as a measurement instrument to evaluate disease activity in RA clinical trials. Proposed alternatives included SDAI, CDAI and Boolean criteria. [less ▲]

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See detailEnglish translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the SARQOL Questionnaire
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Edwards, M.; Dennisson, E. et al

in Journal of Frailty & Aging (2016), 5(Supplement 1), 58

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See detailOptimizing the management of osteoarthritis-Transitioning evidence-based guidelines into practical guidance for real-world clinical practice
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Cooper, C.

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2016), 45(4 Suppl), 1-2

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See detailA consensus statement on the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis - From evidence-based medicine to the real-life setting.
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Cooper, C.; Pelletier, J.P. et al

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2016), 45(4 Suppl), 3-11

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis(ESCEO) published a treatment algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in 2014,which provides ... [more ▼]

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis(ESCEO) published a treatment algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in 2014,which provides practical guidance for the prioritization of interventions. Further analysis of real-world data for OA provides additional evidence in support of pharmacological interventions,in terms of management of OA pain and function, avoidance of adverse events, disease-modifying effects and long-term outcomes, e.g., delay of total joint replacement surgery, and pharmacoeconomic factors such as reduction in healthcare resource utilization. This article provides an updated assessment of the literature for selected interventions in OA, focusing on real-life data, with the aim of providing easy-to-follow advice on how to establish a treatment flow in patients with knee OA in primary care clinical practice, in support of the clinicians’ individualized assessment of the patient. In step 1, background maintenance therapy with symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs) is recommended, for which high-quality evidence is provided only for the prescription formulations of patented crystalline glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate. Paracetamol may be added for rescue analgesia only,due to limited efficacy and increasing safety signals. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may provide additional symptomatic treatment with the same degree of efficacy as oral NSAIDs without the systemic safety concerns. Oral NSAIDs maintain a central role in step2 Advanced management of persistent symptoms. However, oral NSAIDs are highly heterogeneous in terms of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety profile, and patient stratification with careful treatment selection is advocated to maximize the risk: benefit ratio. Intra-articular hyaluronic acid as a next step provides sustained clinical benefit with effects lasting up to 6 months after a short-course of weekly injections. As a last step before surgery, thes low titration of sustained-release tramadol, aweak opioid, affords sustained analgesia with improved tolerability. [less ▲]

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See detailAdherence to a standardized protocol for measuring grip strength and appropriate cut-off values in adults over 65 years with sarcopenia: a systematic review protocol.
FOX, B; HENWOOD, T.; SCHAAP, L. et al

in JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports (2015), 13(10), 50-59

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See detailRecommendations for an update of the 2010 European regulatory guideline on clinical investigation of medical products used in the treatment of osteoarthritis and reflections about related clinically relevant outcomes: expert consensus statement.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; REITER-NIESERT, S.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2015), 23

Objective: The European Society on Clinical and Economic aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) organised a working group to evaluate the need for updating the current European guideline on ... [more ▼]

Objective: The European Society on Clinical and Economic aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) organised a working group to evaluate the need for updating the current European guideline on clinical investigation of drugs used in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Design: Areas of potential attention were identified and the need for modifications, update or clarification was examined. Proposals were then developed based on literature reviews and through a consensus process. Results: It was agreed that the current guideline overall still reflects the current knowledge in OA, although two possible modifications were identified. The first relates to the number and timing of measurements required as primary endpoints during clinical trials of symptom-relieving drugs, either drugs with rapid onset of action or slow acting drugs. The suggested modifications are intended to take into consideration the time related clinical need and expected time response to these drugs e i.e., a more early effect for the first category in addition to the maintenance of effect, a more continuous benefit over the long-term for the latter e in the timing of assessments. Secondly, values above which a benefit over placebo should be considered clinically relevant were considered. Based on literature reviews, the most consensual values were determined for primary endpoints of both symptom-relieving drugs (i.e., pain intensity on a visual analogue scale (VAS)) and disease-modifying drugs (i.e., radiographic joint-space narrowing). [less ▲]

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See detailDiabetes is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis progression
Eymard, F; Parsons, C; Edwards, M et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2015), 23

Purpose Recent studies have suggested that metabolic factors (obesity, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia) and their clustering in metabolic syndrome (MetS) might be involved in the pathophysiology ... [more ▼]

Purpose Recent studies have suggested that metabolic factors (obesity, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia) and their clustering in metabolic syndrome (MetS) might be involved in the pathophysiology of knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated their impact on radiographic progression by an annualised measure of the joint space narrowing (JSN) of the medial tibiofemoral compartment. Methods 559 patients older than 50 years with symptomatic knee OA were recruited for the placebo arm of the SEKOIA trial. The presence of diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia was determined at baseline interview. BMI was calculated, obesity was considered >30 kg/m2. MetS was defined by the sum of metabolic factors ≥3. Minimal medial tibiofemoral joint space on plain radiographs was measured by an automated method at baseline and then annually for up to 3 years. Results The mean age of patients was 62.8 [62.2-63.4] years; 392 were women. A total of 43.8% was obese, 6.6% had type 2 diabetes, 45.1% hypertension, 27.6% dyslipidemia and 13.6% MetS. Mean annualised JSN was greater for patients with type 2 diabetes than without diabetes (0.26 [-0.35 - -0.17] vs. 0.14 [-0.16 - -0.12] mm; p=0.001). This association remained significant after adjustment for sex, age, BMI, hypertension and dyslipidemia (p=0.018). In subgroup analysis, type 2 diabetes was a significant predictor of JSN in males but not females. The other metabolic factors and MetS were not associated with annualised JSN. Conclusion Type 2 diabetes was a predictor of joint space reduction in men with established knee OA. No relationships were found between MetS or other metabolic factors and radiographic progression. [less ▲]

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See detailTrabecular bone score (TBS) as a new complementary approach for osteoporosis evaluation in clinical practice.
Harvey, N. C.; Gluer, C. C.; Binkley, N. et al

in Bone (2015), 78

Trabecular bone score (TBS) is a recently-developed analytical tool that performs novel grey-level texture measurements on lumbar spine dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) images, and thereby captures ... [more ▼]

Trabecular bone score (TBS) is a recently-developed analytical tool that performs novel grey-level texture measurements on lumbar spine dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) images, and thereby captures information relating to trabecular microarchitecture. In order for TBS to usefully add to bone mineral density (BMD) and clinical risk factors in osteoporosis risk stratification, it must be independently associated with fracture risk, readily obtainable, and ideally, present a risk which is amenable to osteoporosis treatment. This paper summarizes a review of the scientific literature performed by a Working Group of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis. Low TBS is consistently associated with an increase in both prevalent and incident fractures that is partly independent of both clinical risk factors and areal BMD (aBMD) at the lumbar spine and proximal femur. More recently, TBS has been shown to have predictive value for fracture independent of fracture probabilities using the FRAX(R) algorithm. Although TBS changes with osteoporosis treatment, the magnitude is less than that of aBMD of the spine, and it is not clear how change in TBS relates to fracture risk reduction. TBS may also have a role in the assessment of fracture risk in some causes of secondary osteoporosis (e.g. diabetes, hyperparathyroidism and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis). In conclusion, there is a role for TBS in fracture risk assessment in combination with both aBMD and FRAX. [less ▲]

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See detailThe position of Strontium ranelate in today's management of osteoporosis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Brandi, M.L; Cannata-Andia, J. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26

Osteoporosis accounts for about 3 % of total European health-care spending. The low proportion of costs for the pharmacological prevention of osteoporotic fracture means that it is highly cost saving ... [more ▼]

Osteoporosis accounts for about 3 % of total European health-care spending. The low proportion of costs for the pharmacological prevention of osteoporotic fracture means that it is highly cost saving, especially in patient with severe osteoporosis or patients who cannot take certain osteoporosis medications due to issues of contraindications or tolerability. Following recent regulatory changes, strontium ranelate is now indicated in patients with severe osteoporosis for whom treatment with other osteoporosis treatments is not possible, and without contraindications including uncontrolled hypertension, established, current or past history of ischaemic heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, and/or cerebrovascular disease. We review here today’s evidence for the safety and efficacy of strontium ranelate. The efficacy of strontium ranelate in patients complying with the new prescribing information (i.e. severe osteoporosis without contraindications) has been explored in a multivariate analysis of clinical trial data, which concluded that the antifracture efficacy of strontiumranelate is maintained in patients with severe osteoporosis without contraindications and also demonstrated how the new target population mitigates risk. Strontium ranelate is therefore an important alternative in today’s management of osteoporosis, with a positive benefit-risk balance, provided that the revised indication and contraindications are followed and cardiovascular risk is monitored. The bone community should be reassured that there remain viable alternatives in patients in whom treatment with other agents is not possible and protection against the debilitating effects of fracture is still feasible in patients with severe osteoporosis. [less ▲]

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See detailRecommendations for the registration of drugs to treat sarcopenia
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Cooper, C; Rizzoli, R et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 62

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See detailCan we identify patients to be treated in osteoarthritis?
Arden, NK; Richette, P; Cooper, C et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 61-62

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See detailTrabecular bone score (TBS) as a new complementary appproach for osteoporosis evaluation in clinical practice
Harvey, NC; Binkley, N; Brandi, ML et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 60

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