References of "Compère, Philippe"
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See detailOrganic and mineral imprints in fossil photosynthetic mats of an East Antarctic lake
Lepot, Kevin; Compère, Philippe ULg; Gerard, E et al

in Geobiology (2014), 12(5), 424-450

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See detailDentinal tubules sealing by means of diode lasers (810 and 980 nm): A preliminary in vitro study
Umana, M.; Heysselaer, D.; Compère, Philippe ULg et al

in Photomedicine and Laser Surgery (2013), 31(7), 307-314

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect on dentinal surfaces of diode lasers (810 and 980 nm) at different parameters. Materials and methods: Twenty-four caries-free human impacted ... [more ▼]

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect on dentinal surfaces of diode lasers (810 and 980 nm) at different parameters. Materials and methods: Twenty-four caries-free human impacted wisdom teeth were used. The crowns were sectioned transversely in order to expose the dentin. The smear layer was removed by a 1 min application of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Each surface was divided into four quadrants irradiated at a different output power setting for each kind of laser: 0.8, 1, 1.6, and 2 W (energy densities: 2547, 3184, 5092, and 6366 J/cm2, irradiation speed 1 mm/sec; optical fiber diameter: 200 μm; continuous and noncontact mode). Half of the samples were stained with a graphite paste. All specimens were sent for scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis. Pulp temperature increases in additional 20 teeth were measured by a thermocouple. Results: Diode laser irradiations at 0.8 and 1 W led to occlusion or narrowing of dentin tubules without provoking fissures or cracks. The application of graphite paste increased the thermal effects in dentin. Measurements of pulp temperature showed that irradiations at 0.8 and 1 W for a period of 10 sec in continuous mode increased pulp temperature (T ≤2 C). Conclusions: Diode lasers (810 and 980 nm) used at 0.8 and 1 W for 10 sec in continuous mode were able to seal the dentin tubules. These parameters can be considered harmless for pulp vitality, and may be effective in the treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity. © Copyright 2013, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2013. [less ▲]

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See detailAntarctic urchin ctenocidaris speciosa spines: Lessons from the deep
Catarino, A. I.; av FD Roosevelt 50, Brussels; Guibourt, V. et al

in Cahiers de Biologie Marine (2013), 54(4), 649-655

Ocean acidification is leading to changes in the oceanic carbonate system. As a result, calcium carbonate saturation horizon is shallowing, especially at high latitudes. Biogenic high magnesium-calcites ... [more ▼]

Ocean acidification is leading to changes in the oceanic carbonate system. As a result, calcium carbonate saturation horizon is shallowing, especially at high latitudes. Biogenic high magnesium-calcites could be particularly vulnerable, since their solubility is either similar or greater than that of aragonite. Cidaroid urchins have magnesium-calcite spines covered by a polycrystalline cortex which becomes exposed to seawater when mature (not covered by an epidermis). However, deep species live at low calcium carbonate saturation states, especially at high latitudes. We describe here the morphology and the magnesium content of Ctenocidaris speciosa spines collected at different depths from the Weddell Sea (Antarctica) and relate the features with seawater calcium carbonate saturation. We observed that the spines cortex of C. speciosa presented a thicker inner cortex layer and a lower [Mg2] below the aragonite saturation horizon. We suggest that the cortex of cidaroid spines is able to resist to low calcium carbonate saturation state. [less ▲]

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See detailInorganic carbon fixation by chemosynthetic ectosymbionts and nutritional transfers to the hydrothermal vent host-shrimp Rimicaris exoculata
Ponsard, Julie ULg; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Zbinden, Magali et al

in ISME Journal (The) (2013), 7

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See detailThe barbel-like specialization of the pelvic fins in Ophidion rochei (Ophidiidae)
Codina, Elisabet; Kever, Loïc ULg; Compère, Philippe ULg et al

in Journal of Morphology (2012), 273(12), 1367-1376

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See detailHistological assessment of gonad maturation in Labeo parvus (Teleostei: Cyprinidae) in Benin
Montchowui, Elie; Compère, Philippe ULg; Thiry, Marc ULg et al

in African Journal of Aquatic Science (2012), 37(2), 155-163

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See detailContinuous synthesis of porous carbon xerogel beads.
Eskenazi, David ULg; Kreit, Patrick ULg; Compère, Philippe ULg et al

in Proceedings of the International Carbon Conference 2012 (2012, June 17)

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See detailInfluence of sodium hypochlorite on Er:YAG Laser-irradiated dentin and its effect on the quality of adaptation of the composite restoration margins
LAHMOUZI, Jamila ULg; Farache, M.; Umana, M. et al

in Photomedicine and Laser Surgery (2012), 30(11), 655-662

Objective: The aims of this in vitro study were to evaluate: (1) the influence of 5% NaOCl application on Er:YAG-irradiated dentin; and (2) its effect on the quality of adaptation of the composite ... [more ▼]

Objective: The aims of this in vitro study were to evaluate: (1) the influence of 5% NaOCl application on Er:YAG-irradiated dentin; and (2) its effect on the quality of adaptation of the composite restoration margins. Background data: Previous research has shown that Er:YAG dentin irradiation produces a thermally affected tissue layer that results in lower bond strength than that of nonirradiated dentin. The removal of this thermally-affected layer may enhance the quality of dentin bonding Materials and methods: Forty-nine caries-free extracted human molars were transversely sectioned in order to totally expose the dentin. Four standardized cavities were created on the dentinal surface of each molar. First, two cavities were irradiated with Er:YAG laser (2.94 nm): 150 mJ, 10 Hz, variable square pulse (VSP) mode (100 μsec), beam diameter=0.9 mm, speed of irradiation=1 mm/sec, 20% air and 20% water. Then, one of irradiated cavities and one of nonirradiated cavities were treated for 30 sec with 5% NaOCl solution. Finally, they went through a standard bonding treatment for composite restoration, etching, bonding, and composite filling. We obtained four groups of cavities: (1) one control group of nonirradiated cavities not pretreated with NaOCl; (2) one group of nonirradiated cavities, pretreated with NaOCl; (3) one group of irradiated cavities, not pretreated with NaOCl; and (4) one group of irradiated cavities, pretreated with NaOCl. All samples were subjected to thermocycling. Every cavity was immersed into a 0.5% solution of methylene blue. The percentage of dye penetration (microleakage) in the composite-dentin interface was evaluated. Six molars were analyzed by scanning electron microscope. Results: Dye infiltration depth was significantly reduced in irradiated cavities treated with 5% NaOCl solution. Conclusions: The application of a 5% NaOCl solution on Er:YAG irradiated cavities can significantly improve the marginal quality of composite bonding. © Copyright 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2012. [less ▲]

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See detailManagement of root perforations using MTA with or without Er:YAG laser irradiation: An in vitro study
Tielemans, Marc; Saloukas, I.; Heysselaer, D. et al

in International Journal of Dentistry (2012)

The aim of this in vitro study is to compare the microleakage of a root perforation sealed with MTA (mineral trioxide aggregate) (group M) to that sealed with MTA following Er:YAG laser irradiation (group ... [more ▼]

The aim of this in vitro study is to compare the microleakage of a root perforation sealed with MTA (mineral trioxide aggregate) (group M) to that sealed with MTA following Er:YAG laser irradiation (group ML). Forty-two recently extracted human monoroot teeth were used. Two cavities were prepared on each root surface. Randomly, on each root, the exposed dentine of one cavity was irradiated prior to MTA filling using an Er:YAG laser with the following settings: 200 mJ/pulses under an air water spray, 10Hz, pulse duration of 50sec, and 0.7mm beam diameter. All cavities were then sealed with MTA. submitted to thermocycling and immersed in 2 methylene blue dye solution for 12h. The penetration of methylene blue in the microleakage of cavity was observed and recorded. The mean value dye penetration in cavities sealed with MTA following Er:YAG laser irradiation (23.91 14.63 ) was lower than that of unlased cavities sealed only with MTA (25.17 17.53 ). No significant difference was noted. The use of an Er:YAG laser beam for dentinal conditioning prior to MTA filling of perforated roots did not decrease significantly the microleakage of MTA sealing when compared to the conventional use of MTA filling. Copyright © 2012 M. Tielemans et al. [less ▲]

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See detailNew digestive symbiosis in the hydrothermal vent amphipoda Ventiella sulfuris
Corbari, L.; Durand, L.; Cambon-Bonavita, M.-A. et al

in Comptes Rendus Biologies (2012), 335(2), 142-154

Ventiella sulfuris Barnard and Ingram, 1990 is the most abundant amphipod species inhabiting the Eastern Pacific Rise (EPR 9°N) vent fields. This vent-endemic species is frequently encountered near ... [more ▼]

Ventiella sulfuris Barnard and Ingram, 1990 is the most abundant amphipod species inhabiting the Eastern Pacific Rise (EPR 9°N) vent fields. This vent-endemic species is frequently encountered near colonies of Pompeii worms Alvinella pompejana. V. sulfuris specimens were collected during the oceanographic cruise LADDER II at the Bio9 (9°50.3′ N, 2508 m depth) hydrothermal vent site. Main objectives were to highlight the occurrence of bacterial symbiosis in V. sulfuris and to hypothesise their implications in nutrition. Observations in light and electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) showed that the outer body surface and appendages are free of microorganisms. In contrast, the digestive system revealed two major microbial communities settled in the midgut and in the hindgut. Gut contents showed bacterial traces together with abundant fragments of Alvinellid cuticle and setae, from A. pompejana, suggesting that V. sulfuris could directly feed on Alvinellids and/or on their bacterial epibionts. Molecular analyses based on the 16S rRNA genes revealed the diversity of bacterial communities in the digestive system, of which, the Epsilonproteobacteria phylum, could be considered as one of the major bacterial group. Hypotheses were proposed on their symbiotic features and their implications in V. sulfuris nutrition. © 2011 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDiet and gut microorganisms of Munidopsis squat lobsters associated with natural woods and mesh-enclosed substrates in the deep South Pacific
Hoyoux, Caroline; Zbinden, M.; Samadi, S. et al

in Marine Biology Research (2012), 8(1), 28-47

Squat lobsters of the deep-sea genus Munidopsis are among the most regularly reported crustaceans associated with deep-sea wood falls. They are often thought to indirectly use these substrates for preying ... [more ▼]

Squat lobsters of the deep-sea genus Munidopsis are among the most regularly reported crustaceans associated with deep-sea wood falls. They are often thought to indirectly use these substrates for preying or scavenging wood-associated molluscs or annelids, albeit the species M. andamanica has been recently highlighted as a xylophagous specialist. In this work, we examined the feeding appendages, gut contents and gut lining of M. nitida, M. bispinoculata and M. pilosa specimens from natural sunken woods and compared them with specimens of the same species having survived and grown on different hard-to-digest substrates (i.e. woods, turtle shells and whale bones) experimentally submerged in the deep South Pacific. In both cases, all three species directly ingest large wood fragments deeply degraded by microorganisms, but M. nitida also feeds on experimentally submerged whale bone and turtle shell fragments. Munidopsis nitida is also the only species to host a resident gut microflora, but the bacterial morphotypes vary according to the ingested substrate. The results suggest that the three species are most probably opportunistic, bacterivorous detritivores and that M. nitida could be at the beginning of an evolutionary process towards xylophagy within the genus Munidopsis. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. [less ▲]

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See detailLiposome surface charge influence on skin penetration behaviour
Gillet, Aline ULg; Compère, Philippe ULg; Lecomte, Frédéric ULg et al

in International Journal of Pharmaceutics (2011), 411(1-2), 223-231

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See detailInsertional mutagenesis to select mutants for modified hydrogen photoproduction in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii
Godaux, Damien ULg; Emonds-Alt, Barbara ULg; Cardol, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2011, May 17)

The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has evolved the ability to redirect electrons from the photosynthetic chain to drive hydrogen production via chloroplast oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases ... [more ▼]

The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has evolved the ability to redirect electrons from the photosynthetic chain to drive hydrogen production via chloroplast oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases. This process occurs under anaerobic conditions and provides a biological basis for solar-driven hydrogen production. Nevertheless, the yield is a major limitation for an economic viability and fundamental knowledge is still needed in order to have a better understanding of the process. In 2000, Melis and co-worker defined a protocol allowing a sustainable hydrogen production in sulfur deprivation condition. By adjustment of an existent protocol called the Winkler test, we are trying to isolate mutants with an attenuated photosynthesis to respiration capacity ratio (P/R ratio). This kind of mutants could be able to reach anoxia needed for hydrogenases activity without the stressful impact of sulfur deprivation. An insertional mutagenesis of Chlamydomonas has been carried out with an hygromycin resistance cassette and about 2500 transformants have generated and screened by the adapted Winkler test. We have isolated several oxygen-consuming mutants and the most promising one is subject to functional, molecular and genetic characterization. To discover new genes involved in hydrogenases activity, we are also planning to screen the same insertional library for mutants with attenuated levels of hydrogen photoproduction, using sensitive chemochromic sensor films which turn in blue in presence of hydrogen. We are currently making the chemochromic sensor WO3 films by dip-coating which is on the brink of being useable. [less ▲]

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See detailOrgano-mineral imprints in fossil cyanobacterial mats of an Antarctic lake
Lepot, Kevin ULg; Deremiens; Namsaraev, Zorigto ULg et al

Poster (2011, April 07)

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See detailIn vitro culture of the parasitic wasp Aphidius ervi: Sweet dream or Reality
Sabri, Ahmed ULg; Leroy, Pascal ULg; Haubruge, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2011, March 03)

Aphidius ervi is an entomophagous parasitoid and represents an effective parasitoid of several aphid species that cause great damages in agriculture. Several investigations, for its in vitro mass ... [more ▼]

Aphidius ervi is an entomophagous parasitoid and represents an effective parasitoid of several aphid species that cause great damages in agriculture. Several investigations, for its in vitro mass production, have achieved a limited success and suggest that in vitro culture of this valuable biological control agent is rather closer to a dream than reality. Our work provides a chronological study of A. ervi development, from the oviposition until hatching of the first instar larva, in the body of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. We show that this parasitoid has some characteristics in its embryological development that are rather complex and different from most other reported insects, which can be phylogenetically very close. Some of these characteristics concern extraembryonic membranes and could be among the causes of the limited success achieved in the in vitro culture. [less ▲]

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See detailPlacenta-Like Structure of the Aphid Endoparasitic Wasp Aphidius ervi: A Strategy of Optimal Resources Acquisition.
Sabri, Ahmed ULg; Hance, Thierry; Leroy, Pascal ULg et al

in PloS one (2011), 6(4), 18847

Aphidius ervi (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is an entomophagous parasitoid known to be an effective parasitoid of several aphid species of economic importance. A reduction of its production cost during mass ... [more ▼]

Aphidius ervi (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is an entomophagous parasitoid known to be an effective parasitoid of several aphid species of economic importance. A reduction of its production cost during mass rearing for inundative release is needed to improve its use in biological control of pests. In these contexts, a careful analysis of its entire development phases within its host is needed. This paper shows that this parasitoid has some characteristics in its embryological development rather complex and different from most other reported insects, which can be phylogenetically very close. First, its yolkless egg allows a high fecundity of the female but force them to hatch from the egg shell rapidly to the host hemocoel. An early cellularisation allowing a rapid differentiation of a serosa membrane seems to confirm this hypothesis. The serosa wraps the developing embryo until the first instar larva stage and invades the host tissues by microvilli projections and form a placenta like structure able to divert host resources and allowing nutrition and respiration of embryo. Such interspecific invasion, at the cellular level, recalls mammal's trophoblasts that anchors maternal uterine wall and underlines the high adaptation of A. ervi to develop in the host body. [less ▲]

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