References of "Collin, Bernard"
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See detailÉtude des contraintes mécaniques locomotrices chez le cheval
Noble, Prisca ULg; Collin, Bernard ULg; Denoix, Jean-Marie et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (in press)

In locomotor biomechanics, three high groups of contraints are commonly encountared : pressure, traction and torsion. In supra-maximal conditions, all of these contraints would be responsible of some ... [more ▼]

In locomotor biomechanics, three high groups of contraints are commonly encountared : pressure, traction and torsion. In supra-maximal conditions, all of these contraints would be responsible of some equine diseased locomotor systems. In order to understand better the contraints in the equine locomotor dynamics, some investigations have been carried out. Moreover, some measurement methods, based on the mechanics of Newton, have been performed. This review shows the different measurement techniques and introduces the mechanical basis that are compulsory for the understanding of the equine locomotor apparatus functioning. [less ▲]

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See detailThe relationship between fetlock joint dorsiflexion and flexor tendon moment arms variations
Noble, Prisca ULg; Collin, Bernard ULg; Denoix, Jean-Marie et al

in Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia (2010, July 28), 39(4), 335-336

Introduction: To calculate flexor tendon forces on the basis of inverse dynamic analysis, flexor tendon moment arms need to be determinated in the equine distal forelimb. Moment arm of deep digital flexor ... [more ▼]

Introduction: To calculate flexor tendon forces on the basis of inverse dynamic analysis, flexor tendon moment arms need to be determinated in the equine distal forelimb. Moment arm of deep digital flexor tendon (dDDF) and of superficial digital flexor tendon (dSDF) have been recognised to vary during the fetlock joint dorsiflexion, however little distal forelimb model has taken into account dSDF and dDDF variations. This study describes a method to determinate the relationship between the fetlock joint dorsiflexion and the flexor moment arms variations. Methods: Eleven forelimbs of eleven horses (~500 Kg) were collected, transversally cut below the shoulder joint, frozen and cut into a sagittal plane until above the fetlock joint. Considering the forelimb pulley model (Meershoek et al. AJVR 2001; 62 1585-1593), in the segment based coordinate system, for the fetlock joint the pulley centers of the DDF and SDF tendons were determined directly from the section. For the fetlock radius-pulley experiments, forelimbs were thawed overnight, fixed to an immobilizing support and attached to a hoist that dorsiflexed the fetlock joint. For the fetlock dorsal angle (θ) 180° to 150°, the dDDF and the dSDF were measured directly from the section. For each tendon all of these data were fitted using a polynomial regression model (OriginPro8) and the relationships between θ and the radius pulley variation (∆d) was described assuming that ∆d was zero at θ equal to 180°. Results : When the fetlock dorsiflexion increased, dDDF and dSDF decreased (∆dDDF(150)= -6.1 mm; ∆dSDF(150)= -5.2 mm) according to the following equations: ∆dDDF(θ)= -0.24923 x θ1 + 0.00139 x θ² (R²=0.89867) ; ∆dSDF(θ)= -0.21494 x θ1 + 0.0012 x θ² (R²=0.91504). Conclusions : A distal forelimb pulley model with variable dDDF and dSDF has been performed. It could become an important tool for use in inverse dynamic procedures. [less ▲]

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See detailCompared anatomy of the locomotor system : a website
Noble, Prisca ULg; Collin, Bernard ULg; Denoix, Jean-Marie

in Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia (2010, July 28), 39(4), 275

Introduction: This website is a multi-dimensional approach of the locomotor system in domestic animals. The first objective of this anatomical presentation is to establish relation between systemic ... [more ▼]

Introduction: This website is a multi-dimensional approach of the locomotor system in domestic animals. The first objective of this anatomical presentation is to establish relation between systemic anatomy and topographic anatomy. The second objective is to teach a practical anatomy that must be adapted to the clinician work. Methods: From the dissection of equine, bovine and canine specimens, osteology, arthrology and myology (OAM) were photographed and filmed. All photos and movies were captioned and designed using Fireworks (Adobe CS4, USA), AVS video converter 6 (MediaTechnologies Ltd, UK) and Divx Author (Divx Inc, USA). The website was designed using Dreamweaver (Adobe CS4, USA). Results: Compared anatomy site consists on dichotomously organised web pages. Each page is transversally and vertically connected with others, and always surmounted by a navigation barr. From the navigation barr we can travel through different drop-down menus (DDM). The first DDM corresponds to the lesson menu (it sends to general OAM) ; the second and third DDMs correspond to the equine picture menu and the bovine/canine picture menu (from them we can navigate in OAM per species and per system using clickable captioned photos and movies, the functional aspects being explained). For practical reasons, equine species is used as animal reference. Indeed only anatomical differences of the other species are detailed and compared. Finally the button Index corresponds to the surgeon view (all of the body is transversally cut, the clickable anatomical structures are sent back to their specific topic web page). Conclusions: Because of the numerous photos and movies, the three-dimensional view is better understood. Because of the transversal and vertical links, the navigation, in whatever level per species or per system or per anatomical cut, strengthens the cognitive process. This website is a fabulous multi-scale tool to teach and to learn the veterinary anatomy. [less ▲]

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See detailA pendulum test as a tool to evaluate viscous friction parameters in the equine fetlock joint
Noble, Prisca ULg; Lumay, Geoffroy ULg; Coninx, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2010, April)

This study describes an equine fetlock joint pendulum test, and investigates the influence of post mortem time and intra-articular lipid solvent on the viscous frictional response. Fresh equine digits ... [more ▼]

This study describes an equine fetlock joint pendulum test, and investigates the influence of post mortem time and intra-articular lipid solvent on the viscous frictional response. Fresh equine digits (control group 1 (n = 6); lipid solvent group 2 (n = 6)) were mounted in a pendulum tribometer. Assuming that pendular joint damping could be modelled by a harmonic oscillator fluid damping (HOFD), damping time (t), viscous damping coefficient (c ) and friction coefficient (µ) were then followed for 5 hours under experimental conditions (400 N; 20 °C). In all experiments, pendular joint damping was found to follow an exponential decay function (R² = 0.99714), which confirms that joint damping is fluid. The evolution of t, c and µ was found to be significantly (P <0.05) different in the two groups. Indeed, t decreased and c and µ increased more rapidly and strongly in the group 2. It was concluded that pendular joint damping can be modelled by an HOFD model. The influence of post mortem time on results suggests that, ideally, joint mechanical properties should only be tested on fresh cadavers at the same post mortem time. Finally, the addition of lipid solvent was found to be responsible for upper viscous friction parameters and for a reduced damping time, which suggests that articular lubricating ability was compromised. This equine pendulum test could be used to test the efficacy of various bio-lubricant treatments. [less ▲]

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See detailAn equine joint friction test model using a cartilage-on-cartilage arrangement.
Noble, Prisca ULg; Collin, Bernard ULg; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline ULg et al

in Veterinary Journal (2010)

This study describes an equine joint friction test using a cartilage-on-cartilage arrangement and investigates the influence of age and load on the frictional response. Osteochondral plugs were extracted ... [more ▼]

This study describes an equine joint friction test using a cartilage-on-cartilage arrangement and investigates the influence of age and load on the frictional response. Osteochondral plugs were extracted from equine shoulder joints (2-5 years, n=12; 10-14 years, n=15), and mounted in a pin-on-disc tribometer. The frictional response was then measured under constant conditions (2N; 20 degrees C; 5 mm/s), and with increasing load (2N, 5N, 10N). In all experiments, the friction coefficient of young cartilage was significantly (P<0.001) smaller than obtained from old cartilage, while the application of a greater load resulted in a significant (P<0.001) decrease in friction coefficient only in old cartilage. It was concluded that cartilage ageing was responsible for an increase in friction coefficient under these experimental conditions. Moreover, where young cartilage lubrication remained stable, cartilage ageing may have been responsible for lubrication regime change. The cartilage-on-cartilage model could be used to better understand lubrication regime disturbances in healthy and diseased equine joints, and to test the efficacy of various bio-lubricant treatments. [less ▲]

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See detailL'articulation synoviale : un systeme tribologique parfait
Noble, Prisca ULg; Collin, Bernard ULg; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline ULg et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2010), 154(2), 83-93

The synovial joint, by load bearing and by minimal wear and minimal friction conferring, is considered as a perfect tribological system. During these last years, researchs in articular biomechanics have ... [more ▼]

The synovial joint, by load bearing and by minimal wear and minimal friction conferring, is considered as a perfect tribological system. During these last years, researchs in articular biomechanics have been performed to study how the joint friction coefficient, a dimensionless measure which represents the ratio between the frictional force on the normal force, was close to zero. Today, there is still no consensual explanation and the articular prosthesis partially imitates the biological mechanics. This review describes the composition and the general properties of the synovial joint components. Additionally, different theorical models, on the tribology of the articular triplex cartilage-synovial fluid-cartilage, are explained. [less ▲]

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See detailHeel effects on joint contact force components in the equine digit : a sensitivity analysis
Noble, Prisca ULg; Lejeune, Jean-Philippe ULg; Caudron, Isabelle ULg et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement (2010), 42

Reasons for performing study: Whereas the effect of heel configuration on the tension of the suspensory apparatus is well documented in the literature, there are few reports of joint contact force ... [more ▼]

Reasons for performing study: Whereas the effect of heel configuration on the tension of the suspensory apparatus is well documented in the literature, there are few reports of joint contact force components in the equine distal forelimb. Objectives: To improve understanding of the effect of heel configuration on equine digit joint loading, a sensitivity analysis was performed to compare the effect of a raised heel on joint contact force components in the coffin and fetlock joints during the stance phase of the trot. Materials and methods: FourWarmblood horses were used. An inverse dynamic analysis was carried out using kinematic and kinetic data. Taking into account the tendon wrapping forces (WF) around the sesamoid bones in the calculations, the joint contact forces (CF) were estimated for the coffin and fetlock joints during the trot stance phase (4 m/s). To test the sensitivity of the results to heel configuration changes, calculations were performed repeatedly for different heel configurations (raised by 0, 6 and 12°). A one-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used to test the effect of heel configuration (at the 3 levels) (a = 0.05; P<0.05; post hoc testing: Bonferroni). Results: For heel configurations raised from 0–12°: whereas the tension of the deep digital flexor tendon decreased and the tension of the superficial digital flexor tendon increased, for the coffin joint the peakWF(1.4 +- 0.25 bwt; 1.2 +- 0.2 bwt; 0.95 +- 0.1 bwt) and the peak CF (2.45 +- 0.25 bwt; 2.2 +- 0.2 bwt; 2 +- 0.1 bwt) decreased significantly (P<0.05). For the fetlock joint, the peak WF (3.8 +- 0.7 bwt; 4.1 +- 0.3 bwt; 4.4 0.25 bwt) and the peak CF (4.35 +- 0.7 bwt; 4.7 +- 0.35 bwt; 5 +- 0.3 bwt) increased, but not significantly. Conclusion: This analysis suggests that the coffin joint loading and fetlock joint loading are strongly connected. The heel configuration may influence both coffin joint and fetlock joint contact force components. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of joint contact forces in the equine digit
Noble, Prisca ULg; Collin, Bernard ULg; Denoix, Jean-Marie et al

in ISB proceedings (2009, July)

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See detailAnatomie Comparée (Web-site)
Noble, Prisca ULg; Collin, Bernard ULg

Learning material (2009)

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See detailPhysiology of reproduction and endocrinology in cervids. A review
Drion, Pierre ULg; Hanzen, Christian ULg; Wirth, Delphine - in memoriam et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2003), 147(5), 291-313

Knowledge about cervids are rapidly growing. This work aims to present the more recent scientific information on reproductive physiology and endocrinology of the cervids: anatomy of the genital tract ... [more ▼]

Knowledge about cervids are rapidly growing. This work aims to present the more recent scientific information on reproductive physiology and endocrinology of the cervids: anatomy of the genital tract, length of breeding season, parameters and endocrinology of the reproductive cycle, endocrinology of pregnancy. It also aims to highlight differences between cervids and domestic ruminants such as embryonic diapause observed in Capreolus capreolus. [less ▲]

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See detailMorphometrical study of the equine navicular bone: age-related changes and influence of exercise
Gabriel, Annick ULg; Detilleux, Johann ULg; Jolly, Sandra ULg et al

in Veterinary Research Communications (1999), 23(1), 15-40

Navicular bones from the four limbs of 95 horses, classified in 9 categories, were studied. The effects of age on navicular bone morphometry and histomorphometry were estimated, after adjustment of the ... [more ▼]

Navicular bones from the four limbs of 95 horses, classified in 9 categories, were studied. The effects of age on navicular bone morphometry and histomorphometry were estimated, after adjustment of the data to even out the effects of front and rear limbs, morphometrical type, sex, weight, and size. All the external measurements of the navicular bone decreased significantly with increasing age. From the histomorphometrical data, cortical bone volume decreased with age in most horses, whereas cancellous bone volume and, in particular, the marrow spaces increased. The increase in the cancellous bone volume could have resulted from tunnelling of the internal part of the cortex, which converted it progressively into a porous trabecular-like structure. Trabecular bone volume also decreased with age and the trabecular lattice changed dramatically to become disconnected in aged horses. These observations corresponded closely to those reported for ageing of the skeletal system in humans. However, in sporting horses, the navicular cortical bone volume increased with age and the cancellous bone volume decreased. Exercise appeared to have decreased bone resorption and increased bone formation at the endocortical junction. The cancellous bone architecture was also improved. in that the trabecular lattice and trabecular bone volume remained unchanged in aged sporting horses. Our findings confirmed that exercise may be good practice to prevent age-related bone loss. [less ▲]

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See detailMorphometric Study of the Equine Navicular Bone: Variations with Breeds and Types of Horse and Influence of Exercise
Gabriel, Annick ULg; Jolly, Sandra ULg; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

in Journal of Anatomy (1998), 193((Pt 4)), 535-49

Navicular bones from the 4 limbs of 95 horses, classified in 9 categories, were studied. The anatomical bases were established for the morphometry of the navicular bone and its variations according to the ... [more ▼]

Navicular bones from the 4 limbs of 95 horses, classified in 9 categories, were studied. The anatomical bases were established for the morphometry of the navicular bone and its variations according to the category of horse, after corrections were made for front or rear limb, sex, weight, size and age. In ponies, navicular bone measurements were smallest for light ponies and regularly increased with body size, but in horses, navicular bone dimensions were smallest for the athletic halfbred, intermediate for draft horse, thoroughbreds and sedentary halfbreds and largest for heavy halfbreds. The athletic halfbred thus showed reduced bone dimensions when compared with other horse types. Navicular bones from 61 horses were studied histomorphometrically. Light horses and ponies possessed larger amounts of cancellous bone and less cortical bone. Draft horses and heavy ponies showed marked thickening of cortical bone with minimum intracortical porosity, and a decrease in marrow spaces associated with more trabecular bone. Two distinct zones were observed for the flexor surface cortex: an external zone composed mainly of poorly remodelled lamellar bone, disposed in a distoproximal oblique direction, and an internal zone composed mainly of secondary bone, with a lateromedial direction for haversian canals. Flexor cortex external zone tended to be smaller for heavy ponies than for the light ponies. It was the opposite for horses, with the largest amount of external zone registered for draft horses. In athletic horses, we observed an increase in the amount of cortical bone at the expense of cancellous bone which could be the result of reduced resorption and increased formation at the corticoendosteal junction. Cancellous bone was reduced for the athletic horses but the number of trabeculae and their specific surfaces were larger. Increased bone formation and reduced resorption could also account for these differences. [less ▲]

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See detailEtude morphométrique du sabot et du petit sésamoïde du cheval
Gabriel, Annick ULg; Detilleux, J.; Jolly, S. et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (1997), 147

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See detailEtude morphométrique des squelettes équins mérovingiens de Tournai
Gabriel, Annick ULg; Mees, G; Collin, Bernard ULg

in Colloques d'histoire des connaissances zoologiques, Tome 6. Le cheval et les autres équidés: aspect de l'histoire de leur insertion dans les activités humaines (1995)

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See detailEtude morphométrique des squelettes équins mérovingiens
Gabriel, Annick ULg; Mees, G; Collin, Bernard ULg

in Colloques d'Histoire des Connaissances Zoologiques (1994)

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See detailEtude morphométrique des chevaux Mérovingiens
Gabriel, Annick ULg; Mees, G; Collin, Bernard ULg

in Tony Hackens; Raymond Brulet (Eds.) Les Fouilles du quartier Saint-Brice à Tournai", Vol. 2 (1991)

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See detailEtude morphométrique des chevaux Mérovingiens
Gabriel, Annick ULg; Mees, G.; Collin, Bernard ULg

in Hackens, Tony; Brulet, Raymond (Eds.) Les Fouilles du quartier Saint-Brice à Tournai (1991)

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