References of "Colinet, Gilles"
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See detailCrop residue management in arable cropping systems under a temperate climate. Part 2: Soil physical properties and crop production. A review
Hiel, Marie-Pierre ULg; Chelin, Marie ULg; Parvin, Nargish ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (in press)

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See detailShort-term effects of tillage practices and crop residue exportation on earthworm communities and soil physico-chemical properties in silt loam arable soil (Belgium)
Lemtiri, Aboulkacem ULg; Colinet, Gilles ULg; Alabi, Taofic ULg et al

in Soil & Tillage Research (in press)

Earthworms are known to play integral roles in soils, and are often referred to as vital soil and ecosystem engineers. They have the ability to influence a wide range of chemical, physical, and biological ... [more ▼]

Earthworms are known to play integral roles in soils, and are often referred to as vital soil and ecosystem engineers. They have the ability to influence a wide range of chemical, physical, and biological properties of soil environment. In the present study, earthworm and soil samples were collected from wheat cultivated fields in Gembloux, Belgium under four agricultural practices: (1) conventional tillage with crop residues incorporated into the soil (CT/IN); (2) conventional tillage with crop residues exported from the field (CT/OUT); (3) reduced tillage with crop residues incorporated into the soil (RT/IN); and (4) reduced tillage with crop residues exported from the field (RT/OUT). The different agricultural practices were applied on luvisol soil for four consecutive years prior to the initiation of the current study. The purpose of this study was to research the influence of agricultural practices on earthworms with considering species and their interactions with soil properties. Results indicated that agricultural practices affected soil properties and earthworm communities. For each depth, measures of soil physico-chemical properties showed significant differences among treatments. The penetration resistance (PR) measured to a depth of 50 cm increased with increasing soil depth in all treatments. PR was significantly higher in RT compared with CT. Soil moisture was measured before PR determination. Soil samples showed higher P and K concentrations in 0 – 10 cm depth compared with other depths. The main reason for the large K and P accumulation near the soil surface is the incorporation of crop residues. Significant differences were not detected between residue incorporation depth treatments, where results showed mean earthworm abundance was respectively 182 and 180 individuals m-2 in CT and RT. Mean earthworm biomass was similarly not significantly different between CT and RT, where results were respectively 48.5 and 57.3 g.m-2. However, a significant difference was observed between IN and OUT treatments, suggesting the exportation of crop residues will limit earthworm abundance and biomass, and will mask the effect of tillage. The endogeic species Apporectodea caliginosa strongly dominated the earthworm community (64%), whereas epigeic and anecic species remained < 3% and 5% of all earthworms. Findings indicate that endogeic and epi-anecic groups appears to be highly affected by tillage practice and the exportation of crop residues. Consequently, it seems that the effect of residue exportation was stronger than tillage effect. In compacted soils, L. terrestris, L. castaneus and A. caliginosa species showed an increased abundance. The obtained results were attributable to earthworm activity and crop residues, suggesting earthworms contributed to nutrient dynamics and soil structure, particularly at increased soil depths. Overall, the results emphasise the influence of crop residues exportation on earthworm community and also, the important influence of earthworm activity on soil physico-chemical properties change, processes which are closely linked. [less ▲]

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See detailÉVOLUTION DE LA TENEUR EN EAU LE LONG D’UNE TOPOSEQUENCE FORESTIERE ARGILO-LIMONEUSE
Deraedt, Deborah ULg; Colinet, Gilles ULg; Degré, Aurore ULg

in Milieux Poreux et Transferts Hydriques (in press)

For the hydrological modeling of forested watersheds, the understanding of the forest hydrodynamic is essential. This study focusses on the hydrology of a Belgian forested plot with high stoniness and ... [more ▼]

For the hydrological modeling of forested watersheds, the understanding of the forest hydrodynamic is essential. This study focusses on the hydrology of a Belgian forested plot with high stoniness and steep slope. The soil water content is monitored at several positions on the toposequence and at different depth. During rain events, peak in soil water content are observed in different depth depending on the position along the toposequence. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigating the Effect of Plant Root Exudates and of Saponin on Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Solubilization in Brownfield Contaminated Soils
Davin, Marie ULg; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg; Colinet, Gilles ULg

Conference (2016, August 08)

In Wallonia, there are 6,000 estimated brownfields (rising to over 3.5 million in Europe) that require remediation. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of recalcitrant carcinogenic ... [more ▼]

In Wallonia, there are 6,000 estimated brownfields (rising to over 3.5 million in Europe) that require remediation. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of recalcitrant carcinogenic/mutagenic organic compounds of major concern as they accumulate in the environment and represent 17% of all encountered pollutants. As an alternative to environmentally aggressive, expensive and often disruptive soil remediation strategies, a lot of research has been directed to developing techniques targeting organic pollutants. The following experiment, based on the observation that PAHs soil content decreases in the presence of plants, aimed at improving our understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved in phytoremediation. It focusses on plant root exudates and whether they improve PAHs solubilization, which would make them more available for bioremediation by soil microorganisms. The effect of saponin, a natural surfactant found in some plant roots such as members of the Fabaceae family, on PAHs solubilization was also investigated as part of the implementation of the experimental protocol. The experiments were conducted on soil collected from a brownfield in Saint-Ghislain (Belgium) and presenting weathered PAHs contamination. Samples of soil were extracted with different solutions containing either plant root exudates or commercial saponin. Extracted PAHs were determined in the different aqueous solutions using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Fluorimetric Detection (HPLC-FLD). Both root exudates of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) or red clover (Trifoliumpratense L.) and commercial saponin were tested in different concentrations. Distilled water was used as a control. First of all, results show that PAHs are more extracted using saponin solutions than distilled water and that the amounts generally rise with the saponin concentration. However, the amount of each extracted compound diminishes as its molecular weight rises. Also, it appears that passed a certain surfactant concentration, PAHs are less extracted. This suggests that saponin might be investigated as a washing agent in polluted soil remediation techniques, either for ex situ or in situ treatments, as an alternative to synthetic surfactants. On the other hand, preliminary results on experiments using plant root exudates also show differences in PAHs solubilization compared to the control solution. Further results will allow discussion as to whether or not there are differences according to the exudates provenance and concentrations. [less ▲]

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See detailCrop residue management in arable cropping systems under temperate climate. Part 1: Soil biological and chemical (phosphorus and nitrogen) properties. A review
Lemtiri, Aboulkacem ULg; Degrune, Florine ULg; Barbieux, Sophie ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2016)

Interacting soil organisms support biological processes that participate in soil functions, organic matter decomposition, and nutrient cycling. Earthworms and microorganisms play a range of beneficial ... [more ▼]

Interacting soil organisms support biological processes that participate in soil functions, organic matter decomposition, and nutrient cycling. Earthworms and microorganisms play a range of beneficial roles in agricultural systems, including increased organic matter mineralization, nutrient cycling, and soil structure stabilization. The following aspects of crop residue management effects are examined in this paper: (i) earthworm composition and structure; (ii) soil microbial communities; and (iii) phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) element availability and distribution in the soil profile. Conventional tillage (ploughing) is often reported to generate decreased soil organism abundance and diversity, primarily earthworms and microorganisms, as well as a uniform distribution of the nutrients P and N within the ploughed soil horizon. Soil residue incorporation of mineral particles can maintain P and N levels, however returning soil also increases aeration and the activation of microbial activity. Hence, comparisons of tillage effects on soil biological functioning and nutrient cycling remain unclear. This review highlights the challenges in establishing definitive evidence regarding the effects of crop residue management on soil organisms and nutrient dynamics. The studies examined reported variability in soil and climate, and the complexity of soil processes contributed to the absence of clear findings. Further research is required under temperate climate conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailNo favorable effect of reduced tillage on microbial community diversity in a silty loam soil (Belgium)
Degrune, Florine ULg; Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas ULg; Dufrêne, Marc ULg et al

in Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment (2016)

Among the soil management practices used to promote sustainable agriculture, reduced tillage and retention of residues from the previous crop are reported to enhance significantly both soil fertility and ... [more ▼]

Among the soil management practices used to promote sustainable agriculture, reduced tillage and retention of residues from the previous crop are reported to enhance significantly both soil fertility and crop productivity. Here, high-throughput sequencing (454 technology) was used to see how the tillage regime (conventional vs. reduced tillage) and the fate of crop residues (retention or removal) affect microbial communities at two sampling depths (top soil: 0–5 cm and deeper soil: 15–20 cm) in a fertile silty loam soil in Belgium. All combinations of these three factors were studied. After 6 years of conversion from conventional to reduced tillage, depth emerged as the main factor responsible for variation in microbial diversity, tillage regime ranked second, and finally, crop residue fate had no influence on microbial diversity. For both bacteria and fungi, the diversity appeared higher in the top soil than in the deeper soil, and surprisingly, higher under conventional than under reduced tillage. These differences are explained by changes in community composition due to taxon loss rather than taxon replacement. The specific local set of environmental conditions (a loess-derived soil and an oceanic temperate climate) may explain these results. These observations raise the question: does impoverishment in indicator taxa influence soil processes, and thus crop production? To answer this question, we discuss how the presence of certain indicator taxa liable to play an ecological role might relate to crop productivity. [less ▲]

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See detailEarthworms Eisenia fetida affect the uptake of heavy metals by plants Vicia faba and Zea mays in metal-contaminated soils
Lemtiri, Aboulkacem ULg; Liénard, Amandine ULg; Alabi, Taofic ULg et al

in Applied Soil Ecology (2016), 104

Earthworms increase the availability of heavy metals in some situations and aid in maintaining the structure and quality of soil. The introduction of earthworms into metal-contaminated soils has been ... [more ▼]

Earthworms increase the availability of heavy metals in some situations and aid in maintaining the structure and quality of soil. The introduction of earthworms into metal-contaminated soils has been suggested as an aid for phytoremediation processes. In Wallonia, Belgium, a century of industrial metallurgic activities has led to the substantial pollution of soils by heavy metals, including copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd), due to atmospheric dusts. Two plant species, Vicia faba and Zea mays, and earthworms (Eisenia fetida) (Savigny, 1826) were exposed to different concentrations of long-term-contaminated soils for 42 days. The soil samples, which were collected from the land surrounding a former Zn-Pb ore-treatment plant, exhibited different levels of heavy metals. Our aim was to evaluate the role of earthworms E. fetida on the availability of metals in soils and their effects on metal uptake by V. faba and Z. mays plants at different soil concentrations. The results suggest that earthworms and plants modified the availability of metals in contaminated soils after 42 days of exposure. Earthworm life-cycle parameters were affected by metal contamination and/or the addition of plants; cocoon production and weight were more responsive to adverse conditions than earthworm survival or weight change. The concentrations of Pb and Cd in earthworm tissues decreased in the presence of plants. Results showed that metal accumulation in plants depended on the metal element considered and the presence of earthworms. However, the presence of earthworms did not change the concentrations of metals in plants, except for Cd. In the presence or absence of earthworms, V. faba accumulated higher concentrations of Cu and Zn compared with Z. mays, which accumulated higher concentrations of Cd. These findings have revealed that earthworm activities can modify the availability of heavy metals for uptake by plants in contaminated soils. Moreover, the study results show that the ecological context of phytoremediation should be broadened by considering earthworm-plant-soil interaction, which influence both the health of the plant and the uptake of heavy metals by plants. [less ▲]

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See detailIndicators of phosphorus status in soils: Significance and relevance for crop soils in Southern Belgium. A review
Renneson, Malorie ULg; Barbieux, Sophie ULg; Colinet, Gilles ULg

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2016), 20(S1), 257-272

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See detailJardin, mon beau jardin...
Colinet, Gilles ULg; Barbieux, Sophie ULg

in Allemand, Sylvain; Heurgon, Edith (Eds.) Nourritures jardinières dans les sociétés urbanisées (2016)

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See detailL’épandage d’engrais de ferme avant le semis d’une culture intermédiaire (CIPAN) présente-t-il un risque important de lixiviation de nitrate ?
Vandenberghe, Christophe ULg; De Toffoli, Marc; Lambert, Richard et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2016), 20(2),

Description of the subject. The implementation of the Nitrates Directives in the Walloon region (in the south of Belgium) allows the summer spreading of any kind of manure on soils in preparation for the ... [more ▼]

Description of the subject. The implementation of the Nitrates Directives in the Walloon region (in the south of Belgium) allows the summer spreading of any kind of manure on soils in preparation for the sowing of a catch crop. Objectives. This paper aims to assess whether the spreading of a manure before sowing a catch crop is more risky for groundwater quality than planting a cereal followed by another crop without any action being implemented between the harvesting of the cereal and the sowing (winter or spring) of the next crop. Method. This study is based on measurements of the nitrate nitrogen content of soils, at the beginning of the leaching period, performed on reference parcels and on controlled parcels. Results. Three thousand six hundred soil analyses performed in relation to controlled parcels between 2008 and 2013 showed that the presence of a catch crop (information about the possible application of a manure was not known) led to a nitrate nitrogen content (median) lower (with a very highly significant difference) than in a situation where no action was implemented between the two main crops. For the same period, the analysis of 600 results in reference parcels led to the same conclusion. Moreover, no significant difference was found between the two kinds of manure (“fast action”, such as pig slurry or “low action”, such as bovine manure). Conclusions. After the harvesting of a cereal, the spreading of a manure before sowing a catch crop creates no higher risk for water quality than the succession of a cereal by a crop sowed in the autumn. [less ▲]

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See detailNo favorable effect of reduced tillage on microbial communities in a silty loam soil (Belgium)
Degrune, Florine ULg; Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas ULg; Dufrêne, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2015, December 01)

To date, only a few studies have applied metagenomics to investigate the influence of different tillage regimes and types of crop residue management on soil microbial communities. These studies were ... [more ▼]

To date, only a few studies have applied metagenomics to investigate the influence of different tillage regimes and types of crop residue management on soil microbial communities. These studies were conducted under specific climates on soils characterized by particular land-use histories. A very different ecological context is to be found in certain areas of Western Europe, such as central Belgium, whose loess-derived soils are among the most fertile in the world and have long been used for intensive agriculture. Specific objectives were to determine diversity levels and changes in microbial community composition under different combinations of tillage regime (conventional vs. reduced) and crop residue fate (residue removal R- vs. residues left R+ on the field). As reduced tillage results in two contrasting zones (the first centimeters of soil are mixed each year, while the soil below remains unperturbed), we chose to perform the analysis at two depths: 0 to 5 cm and 15 to 20 cm. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria on Wheat Growth under Greenhouse and Field Conditions in combination with different nitrogen fertilizer levels
Nguyen, Minh ULg; Ongena, Marc ULg; Colinet, Gilles ULg et al

Poster (2015, November 23)

Many Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) are able to enhance root growth, mineral availability, and nutrient use efficiency of crops. The aim of this project is to screen commercially available ... [more ▼]

Many Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) are able to enhance root growth, mineral availability, and nutrient use efficiency of crops. The aim of this project is to screen commercially available PGPR formulations and lab strains to increase wheat growth and yield in combination with an optimized nitrogen (N) fertilizer application scheme. This could lead to a significant reduction of N fertilizer application without affecting the subsequent grain yields. The screened products collection includes (1) Mix1 (a mix of Azospirillum sp., Azorhizobium sp., and Azoarcus sp.), (2) Mix2 (a mix of Mix1 complemented with two strains of phosphorus-solubilizing Bacillus sp.), (3) Bacillus amyloliquefaciens a, (4) B. subtilis, and (5) B. amyloliquefaciens b. These products were screened under greenhouse and field conditions in 2014 by using spring and winter wheat varieties, respectively. Under greenhouse conditions, there was a significant increase in root dry weight and in root per shoot ratio of plants inoculated with Mix1. Under field conditions, the interaction between PGPR inoculation and different N fertilizer doses was assessed. The grain yield was negatively impacted by low N fertilizer applications. Under such conditions, the inoculation of the wheat rhizosphere with B. subtilis increased the grain yield by 15% relative to the water control. However, in the field trial, the variability between plot replicates was high and lead to non-significant results. Based on these results, modified screening strategies for PGPR selection were set up for the next trials. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria-based Biostimulants on Wheat Growth under Greenhouse and Field Conditions
Nguyen, Minh ULg; Ongena, Marc ULg; Colinet, Gilles ULg et al

Poster (2015, November 16)

Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) are one of the main biostimulant classes due to their capacity of stimulating root growth and enhancing soil mineral availability, hence increasing nutrient use ... [more ▼]

Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) are one of the main biostimulant classes due to their capacity of stimulating root growth and enhancing soil mineral availability, hence increasing nutrient use efficiency in crops. The aim of this study is to screen commercially PGPR-containing products to enhance wheat growth and yield in combination with an optimized nitrogen (N) fertilizer application scheme. This could lead to a significant reduction of N fertilizer application without affecting the subsequent grain yields. The screened products collection includes (1) Mix1 (a mix of Azospirillum sp., Azorhizobium sp., and Azoarcus sp.), (2) Mix2 (a mix of Mix1 complemented with two strains of phosphorus-solubilizing Bacillus sp.), (3) Bacillus amyloliquefaciens a, (4) B. subtilis, and (5) B. amyloliquefaciens b. These biostimulants were screened under greenhouse and field conditions in 2014 by using spring and winter wheat varieties respectively. There was a significant increase in root dry weight and in root per shoot ratio of plants inoculated with Mix1. Under field conditions, the interaction between PGPR inoculation and N fertilizer application was assessed. The grain yield was negatively impacted by low N fertilizer applications. Under such conditions, the inoculation of the wheat rhizosphere with Bacillus subtilis increased the grain yield by 15% relative to the water control. However, in the field trial, the variability between plot replicates was high and lead to non-significant results. Based on those results, modified screening strategies for PGPR selection were set up for the 2015 trials to reduce field variability and possibly achieve higher yield increases. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of the contamination of the soil and forage by heavy metals in the pastureland of the north west of Tunisia
Riahi, Thameur; Colinet, Gilles ULg; Said, S et al

Poster (2015, November)

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See detailMéthodologie de diagnostic environnemental autour de captages d’eau potabilisable sensibles qualitativement du point de vue nitrate
Vandenberghe, Christophe ULg; Bah, Boubacar Billo ULg; Orban, Philippe ULg et al

Report (2015)

Le projet s’inscrit dans le cadre des « contrats de captages » dont la mise en oeuvre est assurée par la SPGE (Société Publique de Gestion de l’Eau) et ce, conformément au contrat de gestion qui lie cette ... [more ▼]

Le projet s’inscrit dans le cadre des « contrats de captages » dont la mise en oeuvre est assurée par la SPGE (Société Publique de Gestion de l’Eau) et ce, conformément au contrat de gestion qui lie cette dernière avec le Gouvernement wallon. L’objectif se décline en trois phases : 1. établir une méthodologie commune de détermination et priorisation des actions à entreprendre autour de captages en vue d’y préserver ou de restaurer la qualité de l’eau ; 2. tester la méthodologie (définition des actions à entreprendre) sur six situations jugées représentatives sur des captages de la SWDE (Société Wallonne des Eaux) ; 3. proposer et coordonner des actions à mettre en oeuvre sur deux ou trois des six sites pilotes. La méthodologie est traduite en logigrammes d’actions qui proposent des démarches communes de diagnostic et d’actions à entreprendre autour de captages en vue d’y préserver ou de restaurer la qualité de l’eau. [less ▲]

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