References of "Chiolero, R"
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See detailGlucose, insulin and myocardial ischaemia
Devos, P.; Chiolero, R.; Van den Berghe, G. et al

in Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care (2006), 9(2), 131-139

Purpose of review The importance of glucose metabolism and insulin therapy during myocardial ischaemia is increasingly being investigated. Insulin is used to achieve a tight glucose control or as part of ... [more ▼]

Purpose of review The importance of glucose metabolism and insulin therapy during myocardial ischaemia is increasingly being investigated. Insulin is used to achieve a tight glucose control or as part of glucose-insulin-potassium therapy. We have reviewed (1) the physiological and physiopathological consequences of hyperglycaemia focusing on potential machanisms of myocardial ischaemia, (2) the effects of insulin on vascular tone, on the release of free fatty acids, on inflammatory pathways, on the switch of energy source and on apoptosis, and (3) clinical data reporting the effects of intensive insulin therapy and glucose-insulin-potassium solutions during myocardial ischaemia and ischaemic heart failure. Recent findings In addition to its known toxic cellular effects, hyperglycaemia increases the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase and promotes inflammation. Conversely insulin exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects. Glucose-insulin-potassium solutions could improve survival after acute myocardial infarction or after surgery, according to recent meta-analyses, but confirmation of these data is eagerly awaited. Summary Hyperglycaemia is toxic, while insulin is beneficial during acute myocardial ischaemia. Some recent evidence confirms a substantial benefit of insulin administered either alone to achieve a tight glucose control or as a component of glucose-insulin-potassium therapy. Further research is needed to confirm that tendency and to define the threshold of tight glucose control. [less ▲]

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See detailIs parenteral nutrition guilty?
Varga, P.; Griffiths, R.; Chiolero, R. et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2003), 29(11), 1861-1864

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See detailEffects of infused sodium lactate on glucose and energy metabolism in healthy humans.
Paquot, Nicolas ULg; Schneiter, P.; Cayeux, M. C. et al

in Diabètes & Métabolism (1995), 21(5), 345-52

To assess the effects of lactate on glucose metabolism, sodium lactate (20 mumol.kg-1.min-1) was infused into healthy subjects in basal conditions and during application of a hyperinsulinaemic (6 pmol.kg ... [more ▼]

To assess the effects of lactate on glucose metabolism, sodium lactate (20 mumol.kg-1.min-1) was infused into healthy subjects in basal conditions and during application of a hyperinsulinaemic (6 pmol.kg-1.min-1) euglycaemic clamp. Glucose rate of appearance (GRa) and disappearance (GRd) were measured from plasma dilution of infused U- 13C glucose, and glucose oxidation (G(ox)) from breath 13CO2 and plasma 13C glucose. In basal conditions, lactate infusion did not alter G(ox) (8.8 +/- 0.9 vs 9.2 +/- 1.1 mumol.kg-1.min-1), while GRa slightly decreased from 15.2 +/- 0.8 basal to 13.9 +/- 0.9 mumol.kg-1.min-1 after lactate (p < 0.05). During a hyperinsulinaemic clamp, hepatic glucose production was completely suppressed with or without lactate. Lactate decreased G(ox) from 17.1 +/- 0.4 to 13.4 +/- 1.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1 (p < 0.05), whereas GRd was unchanged (39.7 +/- 3.6 vs 45.6 +/- 2.6 mumol.kg-1.min-1. It is concluded that infusion of lactate in basal conditions does not increase GRa or interfere with peripheral glucose oxidation, and that during hyperinsulinaemia lactate decreases glucose oxidation but does not alter hepatic or peripheral insulin sensitivity. [less ▲]

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