References of "Chase, J. Geoffrey"
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See detailUntangling glycaemia and mortality in critical care
Uyttendaele, Vincent ULg; Dickson, Jennifer L.; Shaw, Geoffrey M. et al

in Critical Care (2017), 21(1), 152

Background: Hyperglycaemia is associated with adverse outcomes in the intensive care unit, and initial studies suggested outcome benefits of glycaemic control (GC). However, subsequent studies often ... [more ▼]

Background: Hyperglycaemia is associated with adverse outcomes in the intensive care unit, and initial studies suggested outcome benefits of glycaemic control (GC). However, subsequent studies often failed to replicate these results, and they were often unable to achieve consistent, safe control, raising questions about the benefit or harm of GC as well as the nature of the association of glycaemia with mortality and clinical outcomes. In this study, we evaluated if non-survivors are harder to control than survivors and determined if glycaemic outcome is a function of patient condition and eventual outcome or of the glycaemic control provided. Methods: Clinically validated, model-based, hour-to-hour insulin sensitivity (SI) and its hour-to-hour variability (%ΔSI) were identified over the first 72 h of therapy in 145 patients (119 survivors, 26 non-survivors). In hypothesis testing, we compared distributions of SI and %ΔSI in 6-hourly blocks for survivors and non-survivors. In equivalence testing, we assessed if differences in these distributions, based on blood glucose measurement error, were clinically significant. Results: SI level was never equivalent between survivors and non-survivors (95% CI of percentage difference in medians outside ±12%). Non-survivors had higher SI, ranging from 9% to 47% higher overall in 6-h blocks, and this difference became statistically significant as glycaemic control progressed. %ΔSI was equivalent between survivors and non-survivors for all 6-hourly blocks (95% CI of difference in medians within ±12%) and decreased in general over time as glycaemic control progressed. Conclusions: Whereas non-survivors had higher SI levels, variability was equivalent to that of survivors over the first 72 h. These results indicate survivors and non-survivors are equally controllable, given an effective glycaemic control protocol, suggesting that glycaemia level and variability, and thus the association between glycaemia and outcome, are essentially determined by the control provided rather than by underlying patient or metabolic condition. [less ▲]

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See detailMinimally invasive, patient specific, beat-by-beat estimation of left ventricular time varying elastance.
Davidson, Shaun; Pretty, Chris; Pironet, Antoine et al

in BioMedical Engineering OnLine (2017), 16(1), 42

BACKGROUND: The aim of this paper was to establish a minimally invasive method for deriving the left ventricular time varying elastance (TVE) curve beat-by-beat, the monitoring of which's inter-beat ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The aim of this paper was to establish a minimally invasive method for deriving the left ventricular time varying elastance (TVE) curve beat-by-beat, the monitoring of which's inter-beat evolution could add significant new data and insight to improve diagnosis and treatment. The method developed uses the clinically available inputs of aortic pressure, heart rate and baseline end-systolic volume (via echocardiography) to determine the outputs of left ventricular pressure, volume and dead space volume, and thus the TVE curve. This approach avoids directly assuming the shape of the TVE curve, allowing more effective capture of intra- and inter-patient variability. RESULTS: The resulting TVE curve was experimentally validated against the TVE curve as derived from experimentally measured left ventricular pressure and volume in animal models, a data set encompassing 46,318 heartbeats across 5 Pietrain pigs. This simulated TVE curve was able to effectively approximate the measured TVE curve, with an overall median absolute error of 11.4% and overall median signed error of -2.5%. CONCLUSIONS: The use of clinically available inputs means there is potential for real-time implementation of the method at the patient bedside. Thus the method could be used to provide additional, patient specific information on intra- and inter-beat variation in heart function. [less ▲]

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See detailPractical identifiability analysis of a minimal cardiovascular system model.
Pironet, Antoine; Docherty, Paul D.; Dauby, Pierre ULg et al

in Computer Methods & Programs in Biomedicine (2017)

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Parameters of mathematical models of the cardiovascular system can be used to monitor cardiovascular state, such as total stressed blood volume status, vessel elastance and ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Parameters of mathematical models of the cardiovascular system can be used to monitor cardiovascular state, such as total stressed blood volume status, vessel elastance and resistance. To do so, the model parameters have to be estimated from data collected at the patient's bedside. This work considers a seven-parameter model of the cardiovascular system and investigates whether these parameters can be uniquely determined using indices derived from measurements of arterial and venous pressures, and stroke volume. METHODS: An error vector defined the residuals between the simulated and reference values of the seven clinically available haemodynamic indices. The sensitivity of this error vector to each model parameter was analysed, as well as the collinearity between parameters. To assess practical identifiability of the model parameters, profile-likelihood curves were constructed for each parameter. RESULTS: Four of the seven model parameters were found to be practically identifiable from the selected data. The remaining three parameters were practically non-identifiable. Among these non-identifiable parameters, one could be decreased as much as possible. The other two non-identifiable parameters were inversely correlated, which prevented their precise estimation. CONCLUSIONS: This work presented the practical identifiability analysis of a seven-parameter cardiovascular system model, from limited clinical data. The analysis showed that three of the seven parameters were practically non-identifiable, thus limiting the use of the model as a monitoring tool. Slight changes in the time-varying function modeling cardiac contraction and use of larger values for the reference range of venous pressure made the model fully practically identifiable. [less ▲]

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See detailImproved pressure contour analysis for estimating cardiac stroke volume using pulse wave velocity measurement.
Kamoi, Shun; Pretty, Christopher; Balmer, Joel et al

in BioMedical Engineering OnLine (2017), 16(1), 51

BACKGROUND: Pressure contour analysis is commonly used to estimate cardiac performance for patients suffering from cardiovascular dysfunction in the intensive care unit. However, the existing techniques ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Pressure contour analysis is commonly used to estimate cardiac performance for patients suffering from cardiovascular dysfunction in the intensive care unit. However, the existing techniques for continuous estimation of stroke volume (SV) from pressure measurement can be unreliable during hemodynamic instability, which is inevitable for patients requiring significant treatment. For this reason, pressure contour methods must be improved to capture changes in vascular properties and thus provide accurate conversion from pressure to flow. METHODS: This paper presents a novel pressure contour method utilizing pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurement to capture vascular properties. A three-element Windkessel model combined with the reservoir-wave concept are used to decompose the pressure contour into components related to storage and flow. The model parameters are identified beat-to-beat from the water-hammer equation using measured PWV, wave component of the pressure, and an estimate of subject-specific aortic dimension. SV is then calculated by converting pressure to flow using identified model parameters. The accuracy of this novel method is investigated using data from porcine experiments (N = 4 Pietrain pigs, 20-24.5 kg), where hemodynamic properties were significantly altered using dobutamine, fluid administration, and mechanical ventilation. In the experiment, left ventricular volume was measured using admittance catheter, and aortic pressure waveforms were measured at two locations, the aortic arch and abdominal aorta. RESULTS: Bland-Altman analysis comparing gold-standard SV measured by the admittance catheter and estimated SV from the novel method showed average limits of agreement of +/-26% across significant hemodynamic alterations. This result shows the method is capable of estimating clinically acceptable absolute SV values according to Critchely and Critchely. CONCLUSION: The novel pressure contour method presented can accurately estimate and track SV even when hemodynamic properties are significantly altered. Integrating PWV measurements into pressure contour analysis improves identification of beat-to-beat changes in Windkessel model parameters, and thus, provides accurate estimate of blood flow from measured pressure contour. The method has great potential for overcoming weaknesses associated with current pressure contour methods for estimating SV. [less ▲]

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See detailA Comparison between four Techniques to Measure Cardiac Output
Pironet, Antoine ULg; Dauby, Pierre ULg; Chase, J. Geoffrey et al

in Proceedings of the 38th International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (2016, August 17)

Cardiac output is an important variable when monitoring hemodynamic status. In particular, changes in cardiac output represent the goal of several circulatory management therapies. Unfortunately, cardiac ... [more ▼]

Cardiac output is an important variable when monitoring hemodynamic status. In particular, changes in cardiac output represent the goal of several circulatory management therapies. Unfortunately, cardiac output is very difficult to estimate, either in experimental or clinical settings. The goal of this work is to compare four techniques to measure cardiac output: pressure-volume catheter, aortic flow probe, thermodilution, and the PiCCO monitor. These four techniques were simultaneously used during experiments of fluid and endotoxin administration on 7 pigs. Findings show that, first, each individual technique is precise, with a relative coefficient of repeatability lower than 7 %. Second, 1 cardiac output estimate provided by any technique relates poorly to the estimates from the other 3, even if there is only small bias between the techniques. Third, changes in cardiac output detected by one technique are only detected by the others in 62 to 100 % of cases. This study confirms the difficulty of obtaining a reliable clinical cardiac output measurement. Therefore, several measurements using different techniques should be performed, if possible, and all such should be treated with caution. [less ▲]

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See detailA Comparison between four Techniques to Measure Cardiac Output
Pironet, Antoine ULg; Dauby, Pierre ULg; Chase, J. Geoffrey et al

Poster (2016, August 17)

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See detailModel-Based Decision Support Algorithm to Guide Fluid Resuscitation
Pironet, Antoine ULg; Dauby, Pierre ULg; MORIMONT, Philippe ULg et al

in IFAC-PapersOnLine (2016, July 26), 49(5), 224-229

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See detailModel-Based Decision Support Algorithm to Guide Fluid Resuscitation
Pironet, Antoine ULg; Dauby, Pierre ULg; MORIMONT, Philippe ULg et al

Conference (2016, June 02)

Fluid resuscitation is the first choice therapy for sepctic shock. However, fluid infusion only increases cardiac output in approximately 50 % of cases, while an excess of fluid can have harmful effects ... [more ▼]

Fluid resuscitation is the first choice therapy for sepctic shock. However, fluid infusion only increases cardiac output in approximately 50 % of cases, while an excess of fluid can have harmful effects. Therefore, clinicians are looking for indices to predict the effect of fluid infusion on cardiac output, before giving fluid. In this work, a minimal mathematical model of the cardiovascular system is used, representing the heart, an artery and a vein. The nine model parameters, including total stressed blood volume, are identified from experimental data. The experimental data was recorded during three 500 ml fluid infusions on two pigs infected with endotoxin, to simulate septic shock. The total stressed blood volume parameter is negatively associated with the change in cardiac output after fluid infusion, as observed in previous studies. Subsequently, an algorithm is proposed to guide fluid resuscitation, based on the value of this parameter. The use of the algorithm results in 60 % less fluid being given with virtually no effect on cardiac output. The decision algorithm has the potential to be used in human clinical trials since the data required for parameter identification can be obtained in an intensive care unit. [less ▲]

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See detailCardio-pulmonary mechanics and minimal modelling in critical care
de Bournonville, Sébastien; Pironet, Antoine ULg; Desaive, Thomas ULg et al

Poster (2016, March 04)

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See detailCardio-pulmonary mechanics and minimal modelling in critical care
de Bournonville, Sébastien; Pironet, Antoine ULg; Desaive, Thomas ULg et al

in 14th Belgian Day on Biomedical Engineering (2016, March 04)

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See detailParameter Correlation Analysis in Four Mathematical Models of Left Ventricular Relaxation
Pironet, Antoine ULg; MORIMONT, Philippe ULg; Dauby, Pierre ULg et al

in 14th Belgian Day on Biomedical Engineering (2016, March 04)

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See detailStructural identifiability analysis of a cardiovascular system model
Pironet, Antoine ULg; Dauby, Pierre ULg; Chase, J. Geoffrey et al

in Medical engineering & physics (2016)

The six-chamber cardiovascular system model of Burkhoff and Tyberg has been used in several theoretical and experimental studies. However, this cardiovascular system model (and others derived from it) are ... [more ▼]

The six-chamber cardiovascular system model of Burkhoff and Tyberg has been used in several theoretical and experimental studies. However, this cardiovascular system model (and others derived from it) are not identifiable from any output set. In this work, two such cases of structural non-identifiability are first presented. These cases occur when the model output set only contains a single type of information (pressure or volume). A specific output set is thus chosen, mixing pressure and volume information and containing only a limited number of clinically available measurements. Then, by manipulating the model equations involving these outputs, it is demonstrated that the six-chamber cardiovascular system model is structurally globally identifiable. A further simplification is made, assuming known cardiac valve resistances. Because of the poor practical identifiability of these four parameters, this assumption is usual. Under this hypothesis, the six-chamber cardiovascular system model is structurally identifiable from an even smaller dataset. As a consequence, parameter values computed from limited but well-chosen datasets are theoretically unique. This means that the parameter identification procedure can safely be performed on the model from such a well-chosen dataset. Thus, the model may be considered suitable for use in diagnosis. [less ▲]

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See detailBlood Glucose Levels of Subelite Athletes During 6 Days of Free Living.
Thomas, Felicity Louise ULg; Pretty, Chris G.; Desaive, Thomas ULg et al

in Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology (2016)

BACKGROUND: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices, with their 1-5 min measurement interval, allow blood glucose (BG) concentration dynamics to be captured more frequently and less invasively than ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices, with their 1-5 min measurement interval, allow blood glucose (BG) concentration dynamics to be captured more frequently and less invasively than traditional BG measures. One cohort CGM could provide insight is athletes. This study investigates what impact their heightened energy expenditure and dietary intake may have on their ability to achieve optimal BG. METHODS: Ten subelite athletes (resting HR<60 bpm, training>6 hrs per week) were recruited. Two Ipro2 CGM devices (Medtronic Minimed, Northridge, CA) were inserted into the abdomen and remained in place for ~6 days. Time in band was calculated as the percentage of CGM BG measurements with in the 4.0-6.0 mmol/L. Fasting glucose was calculated using CGM calibration BG measurements and postprandial glucose response was also calculated using the CGM values. RESULTS: 4/10 athletes studied spent more than 70% of the total monitoring time above 6.0 mmol/L even with the 2-hour period after meals is excluded. Fasting BG was also in the ADA defined prediabetes range for 3/10 athletes. Only 1 participant spent substantial time below 4.0 mmol/L which was largely due to significantly lower energy intake compared to recommendations. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to expectations high BG appears to be more of a concern for athletes then low BG even in those with the highest energy expenditure and consuming below the recommended carbohydrate intake. This study warrants further investigation on the recommended diets and the BG of athletes to better determine the causes and impact of this hyperglycemia on overall athlete health. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessing respiratory mechanics using pressure reconstruction method in mechanically ventilated spontaneous breathing patient.
Damanhuri, Nor Salwa; Chiew, Yeong Shiong; Othman, Nor Azlan et al

in Computer Methods & Programs in Biomedicine (2016), 130

BACKGROUND: Respiratory system modelling can aid clinical decision making during mechanical ventilation (MV) in intensive care. However, spontaneous breathing (SB) efforts can produce entrained "M-wave ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Respiratory system modelling can aid clinical decision making during mechanical ventilation (MV) in intensive care. However, spontaneous breathing (SB) efforts can produce entrained "M-wave" airway pressure waveforms that inhibit identification of accurate values for respiratory system elastance and airway resistance. A pressure wave reconstruction method is proposed to accurately identify respiratory mechanics, assess the level of SB effort, and quantify the incidence of SB effort without uncommon measuring devices or interruption to care. METHODS: Data from 275 breaths aggregated from all mechanically ventilated patients at Christchurch Hospital were used in this study. The breath specific respiratory elastance is calculated using a time-varying elastance model. A pressure reconstruction method is proposed to reconstruct pressure waves identified as being affected by SB effort. The area under the curve of the time-varying respiratory elastance (AUC Edrs) are calculated and compared, where unreconstructed waves yield lower AUC Edrs. The difference between the reconstructed and unreconstructed pressure is denoted as a surrogate measure of SB effort. RESULTS: The pressure reconstruction method yielded a median AUC Edrs of 19.21 [IQR: 16.30-22.47]cmH2Os/l. In contrast, the median AUC Edrs for unreconstructed M-wave data was 20.41 [IQR: 16.68-22.81]cmH2Os/l. The pressure reconstruction method had the least variability in AUC Edrs assessed by the robust coefficient of variation (RCV)=0.04 versus 0.05 for unreconstructed data. Each patient exhibited different levels of SB effort, independent from MV setting, indicating the need for non-invasive, real time assessment of SB effort. CONCLUSION: A simple reconstruction method enables more consistent real-time estimation of the true, underlying respiratory system mechanics of a SB patient and provides the surrogate of SB effort, which may be clinically useful for clinicians in determining optimal ventilator settings to improve patient care. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucose Control in the ICU: A Continuing Story.
Preiser, Jean-Charles; Chase, J. Geoffrey; Hovorka, Roman et al

in Journal of diabetes science and technology (2016)

In the present era of near-continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and automated therapeutic closed-loop systems, measures of accuracy and of quality of glucose control need to be standardized for licensing ... [more ▼]

In the present era of near-continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and automated therapeutic closed-loop systems, measures of accuracy and of quality of glucose control need to be standardized for licensing authorities and to enable comparisons across studies and devices. Adequately powered, good quality, randomized, controlled studies are needed to assess the impact of different CGM devices on the quality of glucose control, workload, and costs. The additional effects of continuing glucose control on the general floor after the ICU stay also need to be investigated. Current algorithms need to be adapted and validated for CGM, including effects on glucose variability and workload. Improved collaboration within the industry needs to be encouraged because no single company produces all the necessary components for an automated closed-loop system. Combining glucose measurement with measurement of other variables in 1 sensor may help make this approach more financially viable. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential Acute Impacts of Sleeve Gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery and Matched Caloric Restriction Diet on Insulin Secretion, Insulin Effectiveness and Non-Esterified Fatty Acid Levels Among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.
Thomas, Felicity Louise ULg; Smith, Greg C.; Lu, Jun et al

in Obesity surgery (2016)

BACKGROUND: Bariatric surgery is an increasingly common option for control of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity. Mechanisms underlying rapid improvement of T2D after different types of bariatric surgery ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Bariatric surgery is an increasingly common option for control of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity. Mechanisms underlying rapid improvement of T2D after different types of bariatric surgery are not clear. Caloric deprivation and altered levels of non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) have been proposed. This study examines how sleeve gastrectomy (SG), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GBP) or matched hypocaloric diet (DT) achieves improvements in T2D by characterising components of the glucose metabolism and NEFA levels before and 3 days after each intervention. METHODS: Plasma samples at five time points during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) from subjects with T2D undergoing GBP (N = 11) or SG (N = 12) were analysed for C-peptide, insulin and glucose before surgery and 3-day post-intervention or after DT (N = 5). Fasting palmitic, linoleic, oleic and stearic acid were measured. C-peptide measurements were used to model insulin secretion rate (ISR) using deconvolution. RESULTS: Subjects who underwent GBP surgery experienced the greatest improvement in glycaemia (median reduction in blood glucose (BG) from basal by 29 % [IQR -57, -18]) and the greatest reduction in all NEFA measured. SG achieved improvement in glycaemia with lower ISR and reduction in all but palmitoleic acid. DT subjects achieved improvement in glycaemia with an increase in ISR, 105 % [IQR, 20, 220] and stearic acid. CONCLUSIONS: GBP, SG and DT each improve glucose metabolism through different effects on pancreatic beta cell function, insulin sensitivity and free fatty acids. [less ▲]

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See detailCardio-pulmonary mechanics and minimal modelling in critical care
de Bournonville, Sébastien; Pironet, Antoine ULg; Desaive, Thomas ULg et al

Poster (2015, November 26)

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See detailCardio-pulmonary mechanics and minimal modelling in critical care
de Bournonville, Sébastien; Pironet, Antoine ULg; Desaive, Thomas ULg et al

in Proceedings of the IEEE-EMBS Benelux chapter 2015 meeting (2015, November 26)

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