References of "Chardon, Michel"
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See detailInternal anatomy of catfishes.
Kapoor, B. G.; Khana, B.; Diogo, Rui et al

in Kapoor, B. G.; Arratia, G.; Diogo, Rui (Eds.) et al Catfishes (2003)

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See detailMorphology, development and evolution of the weberian apparatus in catfishes
Chardon, Michel ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg

in Kapoor, B. G.; Arratia, G.; Chardon, Michel (Eds.) et al Catfishes (2003)

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See detailPreliminary study on the ecomorphological signification of the sound-producing complex in Carapidae
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Chardon, Michel ULg; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg

in Van Damme, Raoul; Aerts, Pieter; D'Août, Kristiaan (Eds.) et al Topics in Functional and Ecological Vertebrate Morphology (2002)

Carapidae can be classified in four ecological groups : pelagic, dermersal, commensal and parasitic. Carapidae display otophysic structures associated with the anterior part of the swim bladder and highly ... [more ▼]

Carapidae can be classified in four ecological groups : pelagic, dermersal, commensal and parasitic. Carapidae display otophysic structures associated with the anterior part of the swim bladder and highly modified labyrinths, which suggest particular acoustic performances. The commensal and parasitic species have the best developed sound-producing features and also the thickest sagitta within the largest otic cavity, and surrounded by the thinnest cranial wall. However, these features do not necessarily imply a direct relation between the sound emission and reception in a given species but suggest a selective pressure lying in the habitat use of the species. The structures involved in sound-production and hearing are seemingly adapted to match the loss of energy of the sonic vibrations when travelling through the host tissues. [less ▲]

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See detailThe branchial basket in Teleost feeding.
Vandewalle, Pierre ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Chardon, Michel ULg

in Cybium (2000), 24(4), 319-342

In teleosts, feeding is effected principally by suction and food is handled by the branchial basket. Preys are carried to the oesophagus by the pharyngeal jaws (PJs). The pharyngobranchial bones ... [more ▼]

In teleosts, feeding is effected principally by suction and food is handled by the branchial basket. Preys are carried to the oesophagus by the pharyngeal jaws (PJs). The pharyngobranchial bones constitute the upper pharyngeal jaws (UPJs) and the 5th ceratobranchial bones, the lower pharyngeal jaws (LPJs). In lower teleosts, these jaws have well-separated spindly parts attached to the neurocranium, pectoral girdle, and hyoid bar; they only transport food and LPJ activity predominates. In acanthopterygians, the PJs become stronger, the left and right ceratobranchials fuse into one LPJ, and the pharyngobranchials join together to form two big UPJs articulating with the neurocranium. In labrids and scarids, the LPJ is also joined to the pectoral girdle. In acanthopterygians, a new retractor dorsalis muscle gives the UPJs the major role in food chewing and transport. Cypriniforms have developed original PJs with strong 5th ceratobranchials opposed to a postero-ventral neurocranial plate. Small-sized preys and food particles are seized by the gill rakers, small skeletal pieces supported by the branchial arches. [less ▲]

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See detailPhylogenetic analysis of the pearlfish Carapini (Ophidiiformes, Carapidae)
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Castillo Cabello, Gabriel ULg; Chardon, Michel ULg et al

in Acta Zoologica (2000), 81

Fishes of the tribe Carapini (Encheliophis and Carapus) share a noteworthy peculiarity: they shelter in holothurian echinoderms or bivalve hosts. Some species are considered parasitic, others commensal ... [more ▼]

Fishes of the tribe Carapini (Encheliophis and Carapus) share a noteworthy peculiarity: they shelter in holothurian echinoderms or bivalve hosts. Some species are considered parasitic, others commensal. This study focuses on the phylogeny of the tribe, using two other Carapidae species as an outgroup (Snyderidia canina and Onuxodon fowleri). Insofar as possible, the selected anatomical and behavioural characters where chosen in an ecomorphological perspective, as features that could be responses to various lifestyle-related constraints. Our character selection also took into account the fact that some features are (presumably) linked. Such features were grouped together as a single trait to avoid their overvaluation. This methodology enabled us to separate commensals from parasites, the former belonging to Carapus and the latter to Encheliophis. Carapus species reflect in their morphology the constraints imposed by a diet of hard, mobile, elusive prey, showing predator-type features: a strong dentition, a wide mouth opening, a robust food intake apparatus. On the other hand, the endoparasitic Encheliophis species show a generally weaker buccal apparatus and narrow mouth opening, in relation to the different constraints of their lifestyle where the diet constraints are less pronounced: they eat body parts of their host. We propose changes in both generic diagnoses and transfer three species from Encheliophis to Carapus. [less ▲]

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See detailMorphological particularities of the head in four Carapidae (Ophidiiformes)
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Chardon, Michel ULg; Poulicek, Mathieu ULg et al

in Séret, Bernard; Sire, Jean-Yves (Eds.) 5th Indo-Pacific Fish Conference, Noumea - New Caledonia, 3-8 November 1997: Proceedings (1999)

A study of the skull and the musculature of the oral and pharyngeal region of four adult Carapidae species (Encheliophis boraborensis, Encheliophis homei, Encheliophis gracilis and Carapus acus) has ... [more ▼]

A study of the skull and the musculature of the oral and pharyngeal region of four adult Carapidae species (Encheliophis boraborensis, Encheliophis homei, Encheliophis gracilis and Carapus acus) has undertaken to compare it with the diet related characters. The cephalic organization of E. boraborensis and E. gracilis seems related to diet (mainly fishes and shrimps for the first one and holothurian tissues for the other) : these fishes are respectively commensal and parasitic. Although the feeding characters of E. homei and C. acus are closely similar to those of E. boraborensis, there are sparse observations of holothurian tissues in their stomach contents. It is suggested that these fishes are commensal when they are adults and have parasitic tendency when they are juvenile. [less ▲]

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See detailMorphology of the buccal apparatus and related structures in four Carapidae
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Chardon, Michel ULg; Poulicek, Mathieu ULg et al

in Australian Journal of Zoology (1998), 46(3), 391-404

The aims of this study were (1) to compare the morphology of the buccal apparatus, the suspensorium and the opercle in four species of Carapidae (Carapus acus, Encheliophis boraborensis, Encheliophis ... [more ▼]

The aims of this study were (1) to compare the morphology of the buccal apparatus, the suspensorium and the opercle in four species of Carapidae (Carapus acus, Encheliophis boraborensis, Encheliophis homei and Encheliophis gracilis) and (2) to investigate the relationships between their cranial anatomy, their carnivorous diet, and their well known ability to enter holothurians. The complex and strong dentition and the wide hyomandibular with thickenings that seem to suit the constraints of the adductor mandibulae muscles partly inserted on the neurocranium are signs of a carnivorous diet. C. acus, E. boraborensis and E. homei have extremely strong buccal pieces and can protrude their upper jaws. However, in E. gracilis, the jaws are more slender, and the insertions of the A 1 along the entire length of the maxillary associated with the lack of mobility between the maxillary and the premaxillary prevent buccal protrusion. These differences could be related to the diet: C. acus, E. boraborensis and E. homei can feed on fishes and crustaceans, whereas E. gracilis feeds only on holothurian tissue. The cephalic morphology of the four species is not incompatible with entering the host. However, the neutralisation of the suboperculum spine by ‘cartilaginous’ tissue could be considered to be a particular adaptation to this behaviour. [less ▲]

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See detailDistinctive Anatomical Features of the Branchial Basket in four Carapidae Species (Ophidiiformi, Paracanthopterygii)
Vandewalle, Pierre ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Poulicek, Mathieu ULg et al

in European Journal of Morphology (1998), 36(3), 153-164

The present study focuses on the branchial basket in four Carapidae species: Carapus acus , Encheliophis boraborensis , Encheliophis homei and Encheliophis gracilis . The aim is to highlight the skeletal ... [more ▼]

The present study focuses on the branchial basket in four Carapidae species: Carapus acus , Encheliophis boraborensis , Encheliophis homei and Encheliophis gracilis . The aim is to highlight the skeletal and muscular features of the branchial basket, especially those that are believed to be related to their way of life and/or to be linked to the presence of primary sound-producing muscles. The space occupied by the primary sound-producing muscles between the neurocranium and the branchial basket gives rise to distinctive skeletal and muscular features. They prevent the 1st pharyngobranchials from becoming attached to the neurocranium in the normal way. These do not seem to play any role in the suspension of the upper pharyngeal jaws, as it is usually the case in teleosteans. The 1st epibranchials are separated from the 2nd pharyngobranchials. Ossified interarcual elements jointed to the 2nd pharyngobranchials and 1st epibranchials are found in the position usually occupied by the latter. The presence of primary sound-producing muscles gives rise to the need for the reorganisation of the musculature which is seen in particular with regards to the levatores branchiales. These are not found on the neurocranium but on the hyomandibular. The general skeletal and muscular data and the observations of the stomach contents suggest that the action of the branchial basket is restricted to carrying food in Carapus acus , Encheliophis boraborensis and Encheliophis homei , whereas it could also play a role in the work of cutting up soft food in Encheliophis gracilis . [less ▲]

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See detailBiomechanics of Feeding in Vertebrates
Beels, Vincent; Chardon, Michel ULg; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg

Book published by Springer (1994)

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