References of "Chapurlat, R"
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See detailDenosumab for the treatment of men with low bone mineral density: 24-month results from the Adamo Trial
Langdahl, B; Teglbjaerg, C; Ho, PR et al

in Endocrine Reviews (2014), 35(3), 22-1

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See detailStrontium ranelate decreases the number of rapid radiological progressors from the first year in SEKOIA study
Chevalier, X; Richette, P; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2014), 22(1), 461

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See detailRepublished: Value of biomarkers in osteoarthritis: current status and perspectives.
Lotz, M.; Martel-Pelletier, J.; Christiansen, C. et al

in Postgraduate Medical Journal (2014), 90(1061), 171-8

Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation. Biomarkers are being developed to quantify joint ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation. Biomarkers are being developed to quantify joint remodelling and disease progression. This article was prepared following a working meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis convened to discuss the value of biochemical markers of matrix metabolism in drug development in osteoarthritis. The best candidates are generally molecules or molecular fragments present in cartilage, bone or synovium and may be specific to one type of joint tissue or common to them all. Many currently investigated biomarkers are associated with collagen metabolism in cartilage or bone, or aggrecan metabolism in cartilage. Other biomarkers are related to non-collagenous proteins, inflammation and/or fibrosis. Biomarkers in osteoarthritis can be categorised using the burden of disease, investigative, prognostic, efficacy of intervention, diagnostic and safety classification. There are a number of promising candidates, notably urinary C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type II and serum cartilage oligomeric protein, although none is sufficiently discriminating to differentiate between individual patients and controls (diagnostic) or between patients with different disease severities (burden of disease), predict prognosis in individuals with or without osteoarthritis (prognostic) or perform so consistently that it could function as a surrogate outcome in clinical trials (efficacy of intervention). Future avenues for research include exploration of underlying mechanisms of disease and development of new biomarkers; technological development; the 'omics' (genomics, metabolomics, proteomics and lipidomics); design of aggregate scores combining a panel of biomarkers and/or imaging markers into single diagnostic algorithms; and investigation into the relationship between biomarkers and prognosis. [less ▲]

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See detailStrontium ranelate improves osteoarthritis symptoms compared to placebo in patients with knee OA: The SEKOIA study
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Richette, P; Bellamy, N et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013, April), 24(Suppl.1), 49-51

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See detailEfficacy and safety of strontium ranelate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: results of a double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Badurski, J; Bellamy, N et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2013), 72(2), 179-86

BACKGROUND: Strontium ranelate is currently used for osteoporosis. The international, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled Strontium ranelate Efficacy in Knee OsteoarthrItis triAl evaluated its ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Strontium ranelate is currently used for osteoporosis. The international, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled Strontium ranelate Efficacy in Knee OsteoarthrItis triAl evaluated its effect on radiological progression of knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: Patients with knee osteoarthritis (Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or 3, and joint space width (JSW) 2.5-5 mm) were randomly allocated to strontium ranelate 1 g/day (n=558), 2 g/day (n=566) or placebo (n=559). The primary endpoint was radiographical change in JSW (medial tibiofemoral compartment) over 3 years versus placebo. Secondary endpoints included radiological progression, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score, and knee pain. The trial is registered (ISRCTN41323372). RESULTS: The intention-to-treat population included 1371 patients. Treatment with strontium ranelate was associated with smaller degradations in JSW than placebo (1 g/day: -0.23 (SD 0.56) mm; 2 g/day: -0.27 (SD 0.63) mm; placebo: -0.37 (SD 0.59) mm); treatment-placebo differences were 0.14 (SE 0.04), 95% CI 0.05 to 0.23, p<0.001 for 1 g/day and 0.10 (SE 0.04), 95% CI 0.02 to 0.19, p=0.018 for 2 g/day. Fewer radiological progressors were observed with strontium ranelate (p<0.001 and p=0.012 for 1 and 2 g/day). There were greater reductions in total WOMAC score (p=0.045), pain subscore (p=0.028), physical function subscore (p=0.099) and knee pain (p=0.065) with strontium ranelate 2 g/day. Strontium ranelate was well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with strontium ranelate 1 and 2 g/day is associated with a significant effect on structure in patients with knee osteoarthritis, and a beneficial effect on symptoms for strontium ranelate 2 g/day. [less ▲]

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See detailLe ranélate de strontium diminue la proportion de patients progressant rapidement dès la première année : une analyse post hoc de l'étude SEKOIA
Chevalier, X; Richette, P; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2013), 80(S1), 59-60

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See detailWhat is the predictive value of MRI for the occurrence of knee replacement surgery in knee osteoarthritis?
Pelletier, J.-P.; Cooper, C.; Peterfy, C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2013), 72(10), 1594-1604

Knee osteoarthritis is associated with structural changes in the joint. Despite its many drawbacks, radiography is the current standard for evaluating joint structure in trials of potential disease ... [more ▼]

Knee osteoarthritis is associated with structural changes in the joint. Despite its many drawbacks, radiography is the current standard for evaluating joint structure in trials of potential disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs. MRI is a non-invasive alternative that provides comprehensive imaging of the whole joint. Frequently used MRI measurements in knee osteoarthritis are cartilage volume and thickness; others include synovitis, synovial fluid effusions, bone marrow lesions (BML) and meniscal damage. Joint replacement is considered a clinically relevant outcome in knee osteoarthritis; however, its utility in clinical trials is limited. An alternative is virtual knee replacement on the basis of symptoms and structural damage. MRI may prove to be a good alternative to radiography in definitions of knee replacement. One of the MRI parameters that predicts knee replacement is medial compartment cartilage volume/thickness, which correlates with radiographic joint space width, is sensitive to change, and predicts outcomes in a continuous manner. Other MRI parameters include BML and meniscal lesions. MRI appears to be a viable alternative to radiography for the evaluation of structural changes in knee osteoarthritis and prediction of joint replacement. [less ▲]

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See detailValue of biomarkers in osteoarthritis: current status and perspectives.
Lotz, M.; Martel-Pelletier, J.; Christiansen, C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2013), 72

Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation. Biomarkers are being developed to quantify joint ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation. Biomarkers are being developed to quantify joint remodelling and disease progression. This article was prepared following a working meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis convened to discuss the value of biochemical markers of matrix metabolism in drug development in osteoarthritis. The best candidates are generally molecules or molecular fragments present in cartilage, bone or synovium and may be specific to one type of joint tissue or common to them all. Many currently investigated biomarkers are associated with collagen metabolism in cartilage or bone, or aggrecan metabolism in cartilage. Other biomarkers are related to non-collagenous proteins, inflammation and/or fibrosis. Biomarkers in osteoarthritis can be categorised using the burden of disease, investigative, prognostic, efficacy of intervention, diagnostic and safety classification. There are a number of promising candidates, notably urinary C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type II and serum cartilage oligomeric protein, although none is sufficiently discriminating to differentiate between individual patients and controls (diagnostic) or between patients with different disease severities (burden of disease), predict prognosis in individuals with or without osteoarthritis (prognostic) or perform so consistently that it could function as a surrogate outcome in clinical trials (efficacy of intervention). Future avenues for research include exploration of underlying mechanisms of disease and development of new biomarkers; technological development; the 'omics' (genomics, metabolomics, proteomics and lipidomics); design of aggregate scores combining a panel of biomarkers and/or imaging markers into single diagnostic algorithms; and investigation into the relationship between biomarkers and prognosis. [less ▲]

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See detailDenosumab treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis for 6 years : results from the first 3 years of the freedom extension
Papapoulos, S; Brown, JP; Chapurlat, R et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012, March), 23(S2), 76

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See detailStructure modifying effects of strontium ranelate in knee osteoarthritis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Chapurlat, R; Christiaensen, C et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012, March), 23(S2), 58-59

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See detailStrontium ranelate reduces the number of radiological or radioclinical progressors in patients with primary knee osteoarthritis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Chapurlat, R; Christiansen, C et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012, March), 23(S2), 366-367

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See detailFive years of denosumab exposure in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis: Results from the first two years of the FREEDOM extension.
Papapoulos, S.; Chapurlat, R.; Libanati, C. et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2012), 27(3), 694-701

The 3-year FREEDOM trial assessed the efficacy and safety of 60 mg denosumab every 6 months for treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Participants who completed FREEDOM were eligible to ... [more ▼]

The 3-year FREEDOM trial assessed the efficacy and safety of 60 mg denosumab every 6 months for treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Participants who completed FREEDOM were eligible to enter an extension to continue the evaluation of denosumab efficacy and safety for up to 10 years. For the extension results presented here, women from the FREEDOM denosumab group had 2 more years of denosumab treatment (long-term group) and those from the FREEDOM placebo group had 2 years of denosumab exposure (cross-over group). We report results for bone turnover markers (BTMs), bone mineral density (BMD), fractures rates, and safety. A total of 4550 women enrolled in the extension (2343 long-term; 2207 cross-over). Reductions in BTMs were maintained (long-term group) or occurred rapidly (cross-over group) following denosumab administration. In the long-term group, lumbar spine and total hip BMD increased further, resulting in 5-year gains of 13.7% and 7.0%, respectively. In the cross-over group, BMD increased at the lumbar spine (7.7%) and total hip (4.0%) during the 2-year denosumab treatment. Yearly fracture incidences for both groups were below rates observed in the FREEDOM placebo group and below rates projected for a "virtual untreated twin" cohort. Adverse events did not increase with long-term denosumab administration. Two adverse events in the cross-over group were adjudicated as consistent with osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). Five-year denosumab treatment of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis maintained BTM reduction and increased BMD, and was associated with low fracture rates and a favorable risk/benefit profile. (c) 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. [less ▲]

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See detailEffet structuro-modulateur du ranélate de strontium dans la gonarthrose : l'étude SEKOIA
Chevalier, X; Chapurlat, R; Cooper, C et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2012), 79(S1), 271

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See detailLe ranélate de strontium diminue le nombre de progresseurs radiologiques ou radiocliniques chez les patients ayant une arthrose primaire du genou
Chevalier, X; Chapurlat, R; Cooper, C et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2012), 79(S1), 270

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See detailA randomized, placebo-controlled study of the effects of denosumab for the treatment of men with low bone mineral density
Orwoll, E.; Teglbjærg, C. S.; Langdahl, B. L. et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (2012), 97(9), 3161-3169

Context: Men with low bone mineral density (BMD) were treated with denosumab. Objective: Our objective was to investigate the effects of denosumab compared with placebo in men with low BMD after 1 yr of ... [more ▼]

Context: Men with low bone mineral density (BMD) were treated with denosumab. Objective: Our objective was to investigate the effects of denosumab compared with placebo in men with low BMD after 1 yr of treatment. Design, Subjects, and Intervention: This was a placebo-controlled, phase 3 study to investigate the efficacy and safety of denosumab 60 mg every 6 months vs. placebo in men with low BMD. Main Outcome Measure: The primary endpoint was the percent change from baseline in lumbar spine (LS) BMD at month 12. Results: Of the 242 randomized subjects (mean age 65 yr), 228 (94.2%) completed 1 yr of denosumab therapy. After 12 months, denosumab resulted in BMD increases of 5.7% at the LS, 2.4% at the total hip, 2.1% at the femoral neck, 3.1% at the trochanter, and 0.6% at the one third radius (adjusted P≥0.0144 for BMD percent differences at all sites compared with placebo). Sensitivity analyses done by controlling for baseline covariates (such as baseline testosterone levels, BMD T-scores, and 10-yr osteoporotic fracture risk) demonstrated that the results of the primary endpoint were robust. Subgroup analyses indicate that treatment with denosumab was effective across a spectrum of clinical situations. Treatment with denosumab significantly reduced serum CTX levels at d 15 (adjusted P < 0.0001). The incidence of adverse events was similar between groups. Conclusions: One year of denosumab therapy in men with low BMD was well tolerated and resulted in a reduction in bone resorption and significant increases in BMD at all skeletal sites assessed. Copyright © 2012 by The Endocrine Society. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationship between changes in bone mineral density and incidence of fracture with 6 years of Denosumab treatment
Bolognese, MA; Miller, PD; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2012), 64(S10), 847

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See detailStrontium ranelate in knee osteoarthritis trial (SEKOIA) : a structural and symptomatic efficacy
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Chapurlat, R; Christiansen, C et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2012), 64(S10), 681

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See detailEffects of Strontium ranelate on knee osteoarthritis pain : a responder analysis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Chapurlat, R; Bellamy, N et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2012), 64(S10), 110

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See detailTreatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis for six years with denosumab : three-year results from the freedom extension
Chapurlat, R; Papapoulos, S; Brown, JP et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2012), 71(3), 588

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See detailEfficacy and safety of strontium ranelate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis : a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled international trial
Cooper, C; Chapurlat, R; Christiansen, C et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2012), 71(3), 693

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