References of "Chaplin, W. J"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailDifferential population studies using asteroseismology: Solar-like oscillating giants in CoRoT fields LRc01 and LRa01
Miglio, A.; Chiappini, C.; Morel, Thierry ULg et al

in European Physical Journal Web of Conferences (2013, March 01)

Solar-like oscillating giants observed by the space-borne satellites CoRoT and Kepler can be used as key tracers of stellar populations in the Milky Way. When combined with additional photometric ... [more ▼]

Solar-like oscillating giants observed by the space-borne satellites CoRoT and Kepler can be used as key tracers of stellar populations in the Milky Way. When combined with additional photometric/spectroscopic constraints, the pulsation spectra of solar-like oscillating giant stars not only reveal their radii, and hence distances, but also provide well-constrained estimates of their masses, which can be used as proxies for the ages of these evolved stars. In this contribution we provide supplementary material to the comparison we presented in Miglio et al. (2013) between populations of giants observed by CoRoT in the fields designated LRc01 and LRa01. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGalactic archaeology: mapping and dating stellar populations with asteroseismology of red-giant stars
Miglio, A.; Chiappini, C.; Morel, Thierry ULg et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2013), 429

Our understanding of how the Galaxy was formed and evolves is severely hampered by the lack of precise constraints on basic stellar properties such as distances, masses and ages. Here, we show that solar ... [more ▼]

Our understanding of how the Galaxy was formed and evolves is severely hampered by the lack of precise constraints on basic stellar properties such as distances, masses and ages. Here, we show that solar-like pulsating red giants represent a well-populated class of accurate distance indicators, spanning a large age range, which can be used to map and date the Galactic disc in the regions probed by observations made by the CoRoT and Kepler space telescopes. When combined with photometric constraints, the pulsation spectra of such evolved stars not only reveal their radii, and hence distances, but also provide well-constrained estimates of their masses, which are reliable proxies for the ages of the stars. As a first application, we consider red giants observed by CoRoT in two different parts of the Milky Way, and determine precise distances for ˜2000 stars spread across nearly 15 000 pc of the Galactic disc, exploring regions which are a long way from the solar neighbourhood. We find significant differences in the mass distributions of these two samples which, by comparison with predictions of synthetic models of the Milky Way, we interpret as mainly due to the vertical gradient in the distribution of stellar masses (hence ages) in the disc. In the future, the availability of spectroscopic constraints for this sample of stars will not only improve the age determination, but also provide crucial constraints on age-velocity and age-metallicity relations at different Galactocentric radii and heights from the plane. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSeismic Evidence for a Rapidly Rotating Core in a Lower-giant-branch Star Observed with Kepler
Deheuvels, S.; García, R. A.; Chaplin, W. J. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2012), 756

Rotation is expected to have an important influence on the structure and the evolution of stars. However, the mechanisms of angular momentum transport in stars remain theoretically uncertain and very ... [more ▼]

Rotation is expected to have an important influence on the structure and the evolution of stars. However, the mechanisms of angular momentum transport in stars remain theoretically uncertain and very complex to take into account in stellar models. To achieve a better understanding of these processes, we desperately need observational constraints on the internal rotation of stars, which until very recently was restricted to the Sun. In this paper, we report the detection of mixed modes—i.e., modes that behave both as g modes in the core and as p modes in the envelope—in the spectrum of the early red giant KIC 7341231, which was observed during one year with the Kepler spacecraft. By performing an analysis of the oscillation spectrum of the star, we show that its non-radial modes are clearly split by stellar rotation and we are able to determine precisely the rotational splittings of 18 modes. We then find a stellar model that reproduces very well the observed atmospheric and seismic properties of the star. We use this model to perform inversions of the internal rotation profile of the star, which enables us to show that the core of the star is rotating at least five times faster than the envelope. This will shed new light on the processes of transport of angular momentum in stars. In particular, this result can be used to place constraints on the angular momentum coupling between the core and the envelope of early red giants, which could help us discriminate between the theories that have been proposed over the last few decades. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAsteroseismology of old open clusters with Kepler: direct estimate of the integrated red giant branch mass-loss in NGC 6791 and 6819
Miglio, A.; Brogaard, K.; Stello, D. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2012), 419

Mass-loss of red giant branch (RGB) stars is still poorly determined, despite its crucial role in the chemical enrichment of galaxies. Thanks to the recent detection of solar-like oscillations in G-K ... [more ▼]

Mass-loss of red giant branch (RGB) stars is still poorly determined, despite its crucial role in the chemical enrichment of galaxies. Thanks to the recent detection of solar-like oscillations in G-K giants in open clusters with Kepler, we can now directly determine stellar masses for a statistically significant sample of stars in the old open clusters NGC 6791 and 6819. The aim of this work is to constrain the integrated RGB mass-loss by comparing the average mass of stars in the red clump (RC) with that of stars in the low-luminosity portion of the RGB [i.e. stars with L≲L(RC)]. Stellar masses were determined by combining the available seismic parameters ν[SUB]max[/SUB] and Δν with additional photometric constraints and with independent distance estimates. We measured the masses of 40 stars on the RGB and 19 in the RC of the old metal-rich cluster NGC 6791. We find that the difference between the average mass of RGB and RC stars is small, but significant [? (random) ±0.04 (systematic) M[SUB]&sun;[/SUB]]. Interestingly, such a small ? does not support scenarios of an extreme mass-loss for this metal-rich cluster. If we describe the mass-loss rate with Reimers prescription, a first comparison with isochrones suggests that the observed ? is compatible with a mass-loss efficiency parameter in the range 0.1 ≲η≲ 0.3. Less stringent constraints on the RGB mass-loss rate are set by the analysis of the ˜2 Gyr old NGC 6819, largely due to the lower mass-loss expected for this cluster, and to the lack of an independent and accurate distance determination. In the near future, additional constraints from frequencies of individual pulsation modes and spectroscopic effective temperatures will allow further stringent tests of the Δν and ν[SUB]max[/SUB] scaling relations, which provide a novel, and potentially very accurate, means of determining stellar radii and masses. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailKepler Detected Gravity-Mode Period Spacings in a Red Giant Star
Beck, P. G.; Bedding, T. R.; Mosser, B. et al

in Science (2011), 332

Stellar interiors are inaccessible through direct observations. For this reason, helioseismologists made use of the Sun’s acoustic oscillation modes to tune models of its structure. The quest to detect ... [more ▼]

Stellar interiors are inaccessible through direct observations. For this reason, helioseismologists made use of the Sun’s acoustic oscillation modes to tune models of its structure. The quest to detect modes that probe the solar core has been ongoing for decades. We report the detection of mixed modes penetrating all the way to the core of an evolved star from 320 days of observations with the Kepler satellite. The period spacings of these mixed modes are directly dependent on the density gradient between the core region and the convective envelope. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSolar-like Oscillations in Low-luminosity Red Giants: First Results from Kepler
Bedding, T. R.; Huber, D.; Stello, D. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2010), 713

We have measured solar-like oscillations in red giants using time-series photometry from the first 34 days of science operations of the Kepler Mission. The light curves, obtained with 30 minute sampling ... [more ▼]

We have measured solar-like oscillations in red giants using time-series photometry from the first 34 days of science operations of the Kepler Mission. The light curves, obtained with 30 minute sampling, reveal clear oscillations in a large sample of G and K giants, extending in luminosity from the red clump down to the bottom of the giant branch. We confirm a strong correlation between the large separation of the oscillations (Πν) and the frequency of maximum power (ν[SUB]max[/SUB]). We focus on a sample of 50 low-luminosity stars (ν[SUB]max[/SUB] > 100 μHz, L <~ 30 L [SUB]sun[/SUB]) having high signal-to-noise ratios and showing the unambiguous signature of solar-like oscillations. These are H-shell-burning stars, whose oscillations should be valuable for testing models of stellar evolution and for constraining the star formation rate in the local disk. We use a new technique to compare stars on a single échelle diagram by scaling their frequencies and find well-defined ridges corresponding to radial and non-radial oscillations, including clear evidence for modes with angular degree l = 3. Measuring the small separation between l = 0 and l = 2 allows us to plot the so-called C-D diagram of δν[SUB]02[/SUB] versus Πν. The small separation δν[SUB]01[/SUB] of l = 1 from the midpoint of adjacent l = 0 modes is negative, contrary to the Sun and solar-type stars. The ridge for l = 1 is notably broadened, which we attribute to mixed modes, confirming theoretical predictions for low-luminosity giants. Overall, the results demonstrate the tremendous potential of Kepler data for asteroseismology of red giants. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Asteroseismic Potential of Kepler: First Results for Solar-Type Stars
Chaplin, W. J.; Appourchaux, T.; Elsworth, Y. et al

in Astrophysical Journal Letters (2010), 713

We present preliminary asteroseismic results from Kepler on three G-type stars. The observations, made at one-minute cadence during the first 33.5 days of science operations, reveal high signal-to-noise ... [more ▼]

We present preliminary asteroseismic results from Kepler on three G-type stars. The observations, made at one-minute cadence during the first 33.5 days of science operations, reveal high signal-to-noise solar-like oscillation spectra in all three stars: about 20 modes of oscillation may be clearly distinguished in each star. We discuss the appearance of the oscillation spectra, use the frequencies and frequency separations to provide first results on the radii, masses, and ages of the stars, and comment in the light of these results on prospects for inference on other solar-type stars that Kepler will observe. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAsteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler I: Data analysis
Karoff, C.; Chaplin, W. J.; Appourchaux, T. et al

in Astronomische Nachrichten (2010), 331

We report on the first asteroseismic analysis of solar-type stars observed by Kepler. Observations of three G-type stars, made at one-minute cadence during the first 33.5 days of science operations ... [more ▼]

We report on the first asteroseismic analysis of solar-type stars observed by Kepler. Observations of three G-type stars, made at one-minute cadence during the first 33.5 days of science operations, reveal high signal-to-noise solar-like oscillation spectra in all three stars: About 20 modes of oscillation can clearly be distinguished in each star. We discuss the appearance of the oscillation spectra, including the presence of a possible signature of faculae, and the presence of mixed modes in one of the three stars. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSolar-like oscillations in cluster stars
Stello, D.; Basu, S.; Bedding, T. R. et al

in Astronomische Nachrichten (2010), 331

This article summaries a talk given at the HELAS IV international meeting We present a brief overview of the history of attempts to obtain a clear detection of solar-like oscillations in cluster stars ... [more ▼]

This article summaries a talk given at the HELAS IV international meeting We present a brief overview of the history of attempts to obtain a clear detection of solar-like oscillations in cluster stars, and discuss the results on the first clear detection, which was made by the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC) Working Group 2. Data from Kepler. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (22 ULg)