References of "Cedraschi, C"
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See detailHow much does the Dallas Pain Questionnaire score have to improve to indicate that patients with chronic low back pain feel better or well?
Marty, M; Courvoisier, D; Foltz, V et al

in European Spine Journal (2016), 25

Purpose: The Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ) assesses the impact of low back pain (LBP) on four components (0–100) of daily life. We estimated the minimal clinically important improvement (MCII) and the ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ) assesses the impact of low back pain (LBP) on four components (0–100) of daily life. We estimated the minimal clinically important improvement (MCII) and the patient acceptable symptom state (PASS) values of DPQ in LBP patients. Methods: 142 patients with LBP lasting for at least 4 weeks completed a battery of questionnaires at baseline and 6 months later. Questions for MCII addressed patientreported response to treatment at 6 months on a five-point Likert scale, while a yes/no question concerning satisfaction with present state was used to determine PASS. MCII wascomputed as the difference in mean DPQ scores between patients reporting treatment as effective vs. patients reporting treatment as not effective, and PASS was computed as the third quartile of the DPQ score among patients who reported being satisfied with their present state. Results: MCII values were 22, 23, 2 and 10 for daily activities, work and leisure, social interest, and anxiety/depression, respectively. PASS values were 29, 23, 20 and 21 for the four components, respectively. The PASS total score threshold of 24 correctly classified 84.1 % of the patients who reported being unsatisfied with their present state, and 74.7 % of patients reported being satisfied. Conclusions: These values give information of paramount importance for clinicians in interpreting change in DPQ values over time. Authors should be encouraged to report the percentage of patients who reach MCII and PASS values in randomized clinical trials and cohort studies to help clinicians to interpret clinical results. [less ▲]

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See detailCore Outcome Measure Index for low back patients: do we miss anxiety and depression?
Cedraschi, C; Marty, M; Courvoisier, DS et al

in European Spine Journal (2016), 25

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See detailPropriétés métrologiques du Dallas Pain Questionnaire
Marty, M; Genevay, S; Courvoisier, D et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2014, December), 81S

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See detailLa volition est-elle un chaînon manquant de la prise en charge du patient lombalgique ?
Broonen, Jean-Paul ULg; Marty, M.; Legout, V. et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2011), 78(1), 238-41

Patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain are typically prescribed a regimen of regular physical exercises to improve pain and function, increase workability, and prevent pain recurrence. However ... [more ▼]

Patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain are typically prescribed a regimen of regular physical exercises to improve pain and function, increase workability, and prevent pain recurrence. However, adherence to home exercise programs is often partial at best. Patients often fail to translate their intention to exercise (motivation) into action (implementation). Volition is the mental activity by which intentions are implemented. In this review, we argue that volition may be crucial to the successful rehabilitation of patients with low back pain. Obstacles to the implementation of intentions are described, as well as factors that promote implementation, most notably the conscious formation of implementation intentions. [less ▲]

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See detailInformation delivery to patients with acute low back pain: a longitudinal observational randomized survey
Marty, M; Moyse, D; Bazin, T et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2009), 68(Suppl 3), 700

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See detailInformation des patients souffrant de lombalgie aigue: enquête sur les pratiques des médecins français
Marty, M; Moyse, D; Bazin, T et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2008), 75

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See detailPourquoi et comment informer le patient lombalgique ?
Bazin, T.; Henrotin, Yves ULg; Cedraschi, C. et al

in Réflexions rhumatologiques (2006), 10(3), 32-35

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