References of "Carstanjen, B"
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See detailTreatment of a severe distal forelimb wound presenting with extensive laceration and distal interphalangeal joint luxation in a donkey
Brogniez, L; Launois,T; Perrin R et al

in Pferdeheilkunde (2012), 28(2), 160-166

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See detailBone markers in pregnant Haflinger mares _ A trimestral evaluation
Greiner, C; Remy, Benoît ULg; CAVALIER, Etienne ULg et al

in Procedings of the Hippos-Congress 2012 (2012, February 11)

Introduction Pregnancy is associated with various physiological changes that essentially affect musculoskeletal conditions in the mare. However, the influence of pregnancy on equine bone metabolism has ... [more ▼]

Introduction Pregnancy is associated with various physiological changes that essentially affect musculoskeletal conditions in the mare. However, the influence of pregnancy on equine bone metabolism has not been studied to great detail. Aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pregnancy on bone turnover markers in clinically normal lactating mares. Materials and Methods Venous blood samples were collected three-times from 17 multiparous lactating Haflinger mares, aged four to 18 years, during the first (T1), second (T2) and third (T3) trimester of pregnancy. Blood creatinine and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) values were evaluated. Serum concentrations of osteocalcin and carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX-I) were determined using an equine specific osteocalcin radioimmunoassay and an automated CTX-I electrochemiluminescent sandwich antibody assay. Results All mares had normal creatinine and GGT values. Serum CTX-I values significantly increased during the last trimester of pregnancy. Serum osteocalcin concentrations were lowest at T2 and increased thereafter at T3. Conclusions Changes in bone turnover seem to depend on the stage of pregnancy in multiparous mares. Highest values of serum CTX-I and osteocalcin were obtained in the last trimester of pregnancy. [less ▲]

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See detailClou de rue chez le cheval
Gabriel, Annick ULg; Verwilghen, Denis ULg; Hontoir, F et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2011), 155

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See detailDie Notfalltracheotomie beim Pferd
Carstanjen, B.; Gabriel, Annick ULg

in Praktische Tierarzt (Der) (2007)

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See detailEvaluation of serum osteocalcin and CTX-I in Ardenner horses with special reference to juvenile interphalangeal joint disease.
Pastoret, V.; Carstanjen, B.; Lejeune, Jean-Luc ULg et al

in Journal of Veterinary Medicine. A, Physiology, Pathology, Clinical Medicine (2007), 54(9), 458-63

The first aim of this study was to establish a profile of age-related normal serum concentrations of osteocalcin (OC) in Ardenner horses. For this first part, blood samples from 49 healthy Ardenner horses ... [more ▼]

The first aim of this study was to establish a profile of age-related normal serum concentrations of osteocalcin (OC) in Ardenner horses. For this first part, blood samples from 49 healthy Ardenner horses were collected. The second aim was to study two biochemical markers of bone metabolism, OC and a carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX-I), in 30 young Ardenner horses during 1 year. Amongst them, 17 showed lesions of juvenile degenerative joint disease in the distal forelimbs. A specific radioimmunoassay for equine OC was used to measure the serum concentration of the marker. The serum concentration of CTX-I was measured using a commercially available human assay validated for use in the horse. The effect of age, sex, season and health status (with or without lesions) was assessed. Levels of OC fall between birth and the adult stage: this decrease being most marked between birth and 1 year of age. This age-related decrease of OC was confirmed in the 30 young Ardenner horses, but CTX-I levels remained constant in this group. The Levels of the two markers changed significantly with the season with higher concentrations during the winter. No significant difference was shown either between the two sexes or between the two health statuses. [less ▲]

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See detailQuantitative ultrasonography for the noninvasive assessment of equine bone: a review
Carstanjen, B.; Gabriel, Annick ULg

in IPPOLOGIA (2006), 17(4), 11-15

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See detailSerum osteocalcin and CTX-MMP concentration in young exercising thoroughbred racehorses
Carstanjen, B.; Amory, Hélène ULg; Sulon, Joseph ULg et al

in Journal of Veterinary Medicine. A, Physiology, Pathology, Clinical Medicine (2005), 52(3), 114-120

Bone responds to exercise with changes in bone (re-)modelling, which might be monitored non-invasively with biochemical bone markers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of exercise on ... [more ▼]

Bone responds to exercise with changes in bone (re-)modelling, which might be monitored non-invasively with biochemical bone markers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of exercise on serum osteocalcin and serum carboxy-terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen generated by matrix metalloproteinases (CTX-MMP) concentration in young racehorses. Seventy-one 2 to 4-year-old Thoroughbreds were included in this prospective infield study. Blood sampling was performed six times (i.e. six sampling cycles) during a 9-month period. Serum samples were analysed with commercial osteocalcin and CTX-MMP radioimmunoassays. Two-year-old racehorses had higher serum osteocalcin and CTX-MMP values than 3-year-old horses. Gender and training amplitude did not significantly influence serum osteocalcin and CTX-MMP values. Two-year-old horses showed an increase in osteocalcin values between cycles 2 and 3 and an increase in serum CTX-MMP values between cycles 1 and 2. Serum osteocalcin and CTX-MMP concentrations decreased between cycles 4 and 5, and 5 and 6. Three-year-old horses showed an increase in serum osteocalcin levels between cycles 3 and 4 and an increase in serum CTX-MMP concentrations between cycles 1 and 2, and 3 and 4. Serum osteocalcin levels decreased between cycles 5 and 6, whereas serum CTX-MMP levels decreased between cycles 4 and 5, and 5 and 6. Two- and three-year-old horses showed a decreased osteocalcin/CTX-MMP ratio between cycles 1 and 2. Moreover, 2-year-old horses showed an increase in the osteocalcin/CTX-MMP ratio between cycles 2 and 3. Sore shin formation did not significantly influence serum osteocalcin and CTX-MMP values. Serum osteocalcin and CTX-MMP are promising bone markers for monitoring exercise induced changes in equine bone metabolism. [less ▲]

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See detailSerum osteocalcin in donkeys as evaluated with an equine-specific radioimmunoassay
Carstanjen, B.; Amory, Hélène ULg; Youssao, I. et al

in Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition (2004), 88(1-2), 1-6

The purpose of this study was to validate an equine-specific osteocalcin (OC) radioimmunoassay (RIA) for use in donkeys and to establish age-related changes in serum OC concentrations in healthy donkeys ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this study was to validate an equine-specific osteocalcin (OC) radioimmunoassay (RIA) for use in donkeys and to establish age-related changes in serum OC concentrations in healthy donkeys. Serial dilutions of donkey serum showed parallelism with standard curves obtained with the equine-specific OC RIA. There was a tight linear regression between donkey serum OC values obtained with the equine specific OC RIA and a commercially available bovine-specific OC RIA. Serum OC levels of 27 healthy donkeys, analysed with the equine-specific OC RIA, showed a tight negative logarithmic regression with age. Least square means and standard error of serum OC values were 67 +/- 10 mug/l in 0.6-4-year-old donkeys (group 1), 32 +/- 9 mug/l in 5-9-year-old donkeys (group 2) and 15 +/- 11 mug/l in >9-year-old donkeys (group 3). Serum OC values were significantly (p < 0.01) higher in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3. The equine-specific OC RIA may be a useful and practical tool to assess bone metabolism and skeletal diseases in donkeys. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effect of race training on biochemical bone markers in young thoroughbreds
Carstanjen, B; Lepage, OM; Sulon, J et al

in Proceedings of the 13th annual scientific meeting of the ECVS (2003)

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See detailSpeed of Sound Measurements of the Third Metacarpal Bone in Young Exercising Thoroughbred Racehorses
Carstanjen, B.; Lepage, O. M.; Hars, O. et al

in BONE (2003), 33

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See detailIsolation ad Characterization of osteocalcin in horses
Carstanjen, B; Wattiez, R; Amory, Hélène ULg et al

in Proceedings of the ECVS meeting 2002 (Resident Forum) (2002)

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See detailThe assessment of third metacarpal bone speed of sound measurements in young exercising thorougbreds
Carstanjen, B; Langlois, P; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

in Proceedings of the European Society of the Veterinary Society (ESVOT) (2002)

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See detailIsolation and Radioimmunoassay Formation of Equine Osteocalcin- Preliminary Results
Carstanjen, B; Sulon, J; Banga-Mboko, H et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2002), 6(1), 8-9

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See detailEinsatz der quantitativen Ultrasonometrie in der Knochendiagnostik beim Pferd
Carstanjen, B; Lepage, OM; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

Poster (2002)

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See detailMulti-site quantitative ultrasound measurements of the third metacarpal bone in young thoroughbred horses
Carstanjen, B; Lepage, OM; Langlois, P et al

in Proceedings of the CESMAS congress 2002 (2002)

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See detailUse of multisite quantitative ultrasonography for noninvasive assessment of bone in horses
Carstanjen, B.; Lepage, O. M.; Detilleux, J. et al

in American Journal of Veterinary Research (2002), 63(10), 1464-1469

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the usefulness of multisite quantitative ultrasonography for noninvasive assessment of bone in horses. SAMPLE POPULATION: 12 healthy horses and both forelimbs from 8 clinically ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the usefulness of multisite quantitative ultrasonography for noninvasive assessment of bone in horses. SAMPLE POPULATION: 12 healthy horses and both forelimbs from 8 clinically normal horses. PROCEDURE: For in vivo measurements, various regions of interest (ROI) were examined on the third metacarpal bone, radius, and tibia. Precision error for speed of sound (SOS) measurements was obtained by measuring each ROI of 4 horses 10 times with probe repositioning. Additionally, 3 operators measured each aspect of the third metacarpal bone of 6 horses 5 times each. For ex vivo measurements, third metacarpal bones were examined at 9 ROI, and SOS measurements were performed before and after soft tissue removal. One ROI of a single forelimb was subjected to 96 ex vivo measurements with 3 different contact media. RESULTS: The lateral aspect of the third metacarpal bone had significantly higher SOS values than the dorsal and medial aspect of the third metacarpal bone. No difference was obtained between SOS values of the lateral and medial aspect of the radius. The tibia had significantly higher SOS values than the lateral aspect of the radius and the dorsal and medial aspect of the third metacarpal bone. Intraoperator coefficients of variation ranged from 0.62 to 3.15%, and interoperator coefficients of variation ranged from 0.78 to 2.70%. Values of SOS were highest when silicone oil was used as the contact medium. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Speed of sound measurements obtained by quantitative ultrasonography in axial transmission mode can be used to precisely measure superficial cortical bone properties of third metacarpal bone, radius, and tibia in horses. [less ▲]

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See detailEquine Third Metacarpal Bone Assessment by Quantitative Ultrasound and Dual-Energy-X-Ray absorptiometry
Carstanjen, B; Duboeuf, F; Amory, Hélène ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 11th annual scientific meeting of the ECVS (2001)

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See detailThe isolation and characterization of equine Osteocalcin
Carstanjen, B; Wattiez, R; Amory, Hélène ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 1st meeting of the International Bone and Mineral Society (IBMS) (2001)

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See detailQuantitative ultrasound and dual-X-ray absorptiometry-measurements of the third metacarpal bone in horses
Carstanjen, B; Duboeuf, F; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2000), 15

The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between in vivo and ex vivo quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurements with and without soft tissue and ex vivo dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at ... [more ▼]

The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between in vivo and ex vivo quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurements with and without soft tissue and ex vivo dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at different aspects and levels of the third metacarpal bone (MC III) in horses. Both MC III of 8 clinically normal horses were divided in 9 sites (lateral, medial, dorsal aspect; proximal, mid, distal level). Speed of sound (SOS) measurements were performed with a QUS multisite device (Sunlight Ltd., Rehovot, Israel) and a DXA device (Hologic Inc., Bedford, USA) was used to evaluate cortical bone mineral density (BMD) at each site. Ex vivo data on MC III were analysed with a mixed model to test the hypothesis of no difference between aspect and level in QUS and DXA while adjusting for fixed member and for random horse effects. Pearson correlation coefficients between SOS and BMD obtained on MC III with soft tissue were calculated for each member and site. A mixed model was used to determine whether there is a difference between in vivo and ex vivo SOS data while adjusting for fixed aspect, level, and member and random horse effects. Highly significant (p<0.001) differences were obtained between aspects for ex vivo SOS and DXA measurements. Differences (p<0.001) were obtained between measurement levels for DXA data. The table shows least squares means (LSM) and standard errors (Std Err) for QUS and DXA measurements performed at different aspects. The correlation coefficient between SOS and DXA over all 9 sites and both MC III was negative (r=-0.28; p<0.001). In vivo and ex vivo SOS data were different (p<0.01) BUT NOT EX VIVO DATA WITH AND WITHOUT SOFT TISSUE (P>0.05). The study suggests that, in horses, SOS results can not be explained only by BMD, but could reflect additional properties of bone, such as elasticity, architecture or bone strength. Our results indicate that soft tissue does not influence ex vivo SOS measurement results. [less ▲]

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