References of "Carnol, Monique"
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See detailThe role of soil microbial diversity and activity in ecosystem functioning
Carnol, Monique ULiege

Conference (2017, October)

Soil microorganisms and soil organic matter availability regulate soil quality and fertility. Through their activity in biogeochemical cycling processes, soil microorganisms decompose soil organic matter ... [more ▼]

Soil microorganisms and soil organic matter availability regulate soil quality and fertility. Through their activity in biogeochemical cycling processes, soil microorganisms decompose soil organic matter and thus regulate nutrient availability and primary production. Landuse changes, such as a shift from forest to agricultural land, as well as a change in tree species composition, can modify microbial diversity and activity and consequently ecosystem funcitoning. Some parameters can be used as biological indicators, relating land use management to soil functioning and ecosystem services. New molecular tools allow now an in-depth investigation of the role of soil microbial diversity in ecosystem functioning. I will adress biogeochemical cycling processes and their relation to ecosystem functioning, with particular emphasis on forest ecosystems. Examples will be drawn from recent research projects investigating the links between tree species, tree species diversity, and soil microbial biomass, diversity and activity in temperate and tropical forests. [less ▲]

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See detailSoil Microbial Properties and Nutrients Content Under Exotic and Native Tree Species in Southern Rwanda
Rwibasira, Peter; Naramabuye, François Xavier; Nsabimana, Donat et al

Conference (2017, October)

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See detailLa qualité des sols, un capital
Carnol, Monique ULiege; Krüger, Inken ULiege; Malchair, Sandrine ULiege et al

in Blerot, Philippe; Heyninck, Christophe (Eds.) Le grand livre de la Forêt (2017)

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See detailLes Cycles Minéraux
Vincke, Caroline; Ponette, Quentin; Carnol, Monique ULiege

in Blerot, Philippe; Heyninck, Christophe (Eds.) Le Grand Livre de la Forêt (2017)

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See detailSpatial and temporal variability of microbial soil quality indicators in two forest catchments
Carnol, Monique ULiege; Bosman, Bernard ULiege; Ratcliffe, Sophia ULiege

Poster (2017, August)

Appropriate indicators for assessing forest soil quality are needed to monitor changes in the frame of air pollution and climate change, assess impacts of forest management actions and consequently decide ... [more ▼]

Appropriate indicators for assessing forest soil quality are needed to monitor changes in the frame of air pollution and climate change, assess impacts of forest management actions and consequently decide on long-term management objectives. In addition to chemical indicators, such as for example soil organic carbon and pH, biological indicators inform on soil functions/processes and provide an early diagnosis of changes in the environment. The objectives of this work were to provide first baseline values for Belgian forest soils, to evaluate the sensitivity of selected indicators to changes in tree species on the same soil type, and to assess the temporal variability of the indicators. This work is part of a long-term study on element concentrations and fluxes in 2 small (each ca. 80 ha) forested watersheds (Waroneu and Robinette, east Belgium) in relation to forest management. Both catchments show spatial variability of tree species cover and drainage. In particular, Robinette was partially clear-cut in 1996 and replanted with deciduous tree species in 1998. Six sub-plots with a specific tree species/soil hydrology combination were defined in each catchment. Selected biological indicators (potential respiration, nitrogen mineralization, microbial biomass, metabolic diversity of bacteria) and two ecophysiological indices (microbial quotient and metabolic quotient) were measured in spring and autumn during 3 consecutive years. Our results suggest that (1) radar plots can be a useful tool to visualize the ranges of several indicators simultaneously (2) the biological indicators showed significant differences between the sub-plots, even though they are situated on the same geological substrate and in a limited geographical region, indicating high sensitivity to detect changes (3) Small scale differences detected raise the question of the appropriate spatial scale and classifying criteria to define baseline values (4) there were no marked seasonal differences, but for some indicators (N mineralization, potential respiration, microbial and metabolic quotients) the sampling moment induced a certain variability. [less ▲]

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See detailMapping Soil Organic Carbon stocks and estimating uncertainties at the regional scale following a legacy sampling strategy (Southern Belgium, Wallonia)
Chartin, Caroline; Stevens, Antoine; Goidts, Esther et al

in Geoderma Regional (2017), 9

The quantification and the spatialisation of reliable SOC stocks (Mg C ha− 1) and total stock (Tg C) baselines and associated uncertainties are fundamental to detect the gains or losses in SOC, and to ... [more ▼]

The quantification and the spatialisation of reliable SOC stocks (Mg C ha− 1) and total stock (Tg C) baselines and associated uncertainties are fundamental to detect the gains or losses in SOC, and to locate sensitive areas with low SOC levels. Here, we aim to both quantify and spatialize SOC stocks at regional scale (southern Belgium) based on data from one non-design-based or model-based sampling scheme. To this end, we developed a computation procedure based on Digital Soil Mapping techniques and stochastic simulations (Monte-Carlo) allowing the estimation of multiple (here, 10,000) independent spatialized datasets. The computation of the prediction uncertainty accounts for the errors associated to both the estimations of i) SOC stocks and ii) parameters of the spatial model. Based on these 10,000 individuals, median SOC stocks and 90% prediction intervals were computed for each pixel, as well as total SOC stocks and their 90% prediction intervals for selected sub-areas and for the entire study area. Hence, a Generalised Additive Model (GAM) explaining 69.3% of the SOC stock variance was calibrated and then validated (R2 = 0.64). The model overestimated low SOC stock (below 50 Mg C ha− 1) and underestimated high SOC stock (especially those above 100 Mg C kg− 1). A positive gradient of SOC stock occurred from the northwest to the center of Wallonia with a slight decrease on the southernmost part, correlating to the evolution of precipitation and temperature (along with elevation) and dominant land use. At the catchment scale higher SOC stocks were predicted on valley bottoms, especially for poorly drained soils under grassland. Mean predicted SOC stocks for cropland and grassland in Wallonia were of 26.58 Tg C (SD 1.52) and 43.30 Tg C (2.93), respectively. The procedure developed here allowed to predict realistic spatial patterns of SOC stocks all over agricultural lands of southern Belgium and to produce reliable statistics of total SOC stocks for each of the 20 combinations of land use/agricultural regions of Wallonia. This procedure appears useful to produce soil maps as policy tools in conducting sustainable management at regional and national scales, and to compute statistics which comply with specific requirements of reporting activities. [less ▲]

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See detailStreptomyces from Moonmilk, an Untapped Source of New Bioactive Compounds
Martinet, Loïc ULiege; Maciejewska, Marta; Adam, Delphine ULiege et al

Poster (2017, May 24)

Moonmilk speleothems of limestone caves host a rich microbiome, among which Actinobacteria represent one of the most abundant phyla. Ancient medical texts reported that moonmilk had therapeutical ... [more ▼]

Moonmilk speleothems of limestone caves host a rich microbiome, among which Actinobacteria represent one of the most abundant phyla. Ancient medical texts reported that moonmilk had therapeutical properties, thereby suggesting that its filamentous endemic actinobacterial population might be a source of natural products useful in human treatment. In this work, a screening approach was undertaken in order to isolate cultivable Actinobacteria from moonmilk of the Grotte des Collemboles in Belgium, to evaluate their taxonomic profile, and to assess their potential in biosynthesis of antimicrobials. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all 78 isolates were exclusively affiliated to the genus Streptomyces and clustered into 31 distinct phylotypes displaying various pigmentation patterns and morphological features. Phylotype representatives were tested for antibacterial and antifungal activities and their genomes were mined for secondary metabolite biosynthetic genes coding for non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs), and polyketide synthases (PKS). The moonmilk Streptomyces collection was found to display strong inhibitory activities against a wide range of reference organisms, as 94, 71, and 94% of the isolates inhibited or impaired the growth of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria, and fungi, respectively. Interestingly, 90% of the cave strains induced strong growth suppression against the multi-drug resistant Rasamsonia argillacea, a causative agent of invasive mycosis in cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous diseases. We are currently identifying molecules responsible for the observed antimicrobial activities which, next to few known bioactive compounds, also reveals many active compounds with molecular masses that do not correspond to known antibiotic deposited in web biomolecules databases such as KNapSAcK, Pubchem, Chemspider. The challenge is to increase the production yields of these unknown compounds, and purify them to further characterize their structure by NMR. Overall, our work supports the common belief that moonmilk might effectively treat various infectious diseases thanks to the presence of a highly diverse population of prolific antimicrobial producing Streptomyces, and thus may indeed constitute a promising reservoir of potentially novel active natural compounds. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes tree species richness attenuate the effect of experimental irrigation and drought on decomposition rate in young plantation forests?
Rahman, Md Masudur ULiege; Verheyen, Kris; Castagneyrol, Bastien et al

Poster (2017, April 27)

Expected changes in precipitation in Europe due to climate change are likely to affect soil organic matter (OM) transformation. In forests, increasing tree species diversity might modulate the effect of ... [more ▼]

Expected changes in precipitation in Europe due to climate change are likely to affect soil organic matter (OM) transformation. In forests, increasing tree species diversity might modulate the effect of changed precipitation. We evaluated the effect of tree species richness on the decomposition and stabilization rate in combination with reduced precipitation (FORBIO, Belgium) and irrigation treatment (ORPHEE, southern France) in young (6-8 yr.) experimental plantations. The species richness were one to four in FORBIO and one to five in ORPHEE. Twenty four rainout shelters of 3 m × 3 m were built around oak and beech trees in FORBIO plantation to impose a reduced precipitation treatment, whereas four of the eight blocks (175 m×100 m) in ORPHEE plantation was subjected to irrigation treatment. These treatments resulted in about 4% less soil moisture in FORBIO and about 7% higher soil moisture in ORPHEE compared to control. Commercially available green and rooibos tea bags were buried in the soil at 5-7 cm depth to measure two decomposition indices, known as ‘tea bag index’ (TBI). These TBI are (i) decomposition rate (k) and (ii) stabilization rate (S). The results showed no species richness effect on TBI indices in both reduced precipitation and irrigation treatment. In FORBIO, reduced precipitation resulted in decreased k and increased S compared to control around the beech trees only. In ORPHEE, both k and S were higher in the irrigation treatment compared to control. Overall, TBI indices were higher in FORBIO than ORPHEE and this might be explained by the sandy soils and poor nutrient content at the ORPHEE site. These results suggest that OM decomposition rate may be slower in drier condition and OM stabilization rate may be slower or faster in drier condition, depending on the site quality. The absence of tree species effects on OM transformation indicates that tree species richness would not be able to modulate the effects of changed precipitation patterns in young plantations. We conclude that in young afforestations, soil moisture has more influence on OM transformation than tree species richness. [less ▲]

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See detailLe rôle de la biodiversité dans le fonctionnement des écosystèmes terrestres
Carnol, Monique ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2017)

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See detailBiodiversity and ecosystem functioning relations in European forests depend on environmental context
Ratcliffe, Sophia ULiege; Wirth, C.; Jucker, T. et al

in Ecology Letters (2017), 20(11), 1414-1426

The importance of biodiversity in supporting ecosystem functioning is generally well accepted. However, most evidence comes from small-scale studies, and scaling-up patterns of biodiversity– ecosystem ... [more ▼]

The importance of biodiversity in supporting ecosystem functioning is generally well accepted. However, most evidence comes from small-scale studies, and scaling-up patterns of biodiversity– ecosystem functioning (B-EF) remains challenging, in part because the importance of environmental factors in shaping B-EF relations is poorly understood. Using a forest research platform in which 26 ecosystem functions were measured along gradients of tree species richness in six regions across Europe, we investigated the extent and the potential drivers of context dependency of BEF relations. Despite considerable variation in species richness effects across the continent, we found a tendency for stronger B-EF relations in drier climates as well as in areas with longer growing seasons and more functionally diverse tree species. The importance of water availability in driving context dependency suggests that as water limitation increases under climate change, biodiversity may become even more important to support high levels of functioning in European forests. [less ▲]

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See detailL’intégration d’indicateurs biologiques dans un réseau de surveillance des sols afin d’améliorer le diagnostic de la qualité du sol – une étude de cas dans le sud de la Belgique (Wallonie)
Krüger, Inken ULiege; Chartin, Caroline; van Wesemael, Bas et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2017), 21(S1),

Soil organisms and their activities are essential for soil ecosystem functioning and they can thus be used as pertinent indicators of soil quality. Recent efforts have been undertaken to include ... [more ▼]

Soil organisms and their activities are essential for soil ecosystem functioning and they can thus be used as pertinent indicators of soil quality. Recent efforts have been undertaken to include biological indicators of soil quality into regional/national monitoring networks. Objectives. The aim of this study was to provide a first dataset of six biological indicators and two eco-physiological quotients for two landscape units in Wallonia. These spatial units are characterized by homogeneous climate conditions, soil type, land-use and management (here, grasslands in the Ardennes, and croplands in the Loam Region). Method. Respiration potential, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, net nitrogen mineralization, metabolic potential of soil bacteria and earthworm abundance were measured at a total of 60 sites in two different landscape units (LSU). Variability within each LSU was studied. Data was synthesized through calculation of a comprehensive score and presentation as radar plots. Results. All selected biological indicators were significantly higher under grassland than under cropland soils, highlighting the biological indicators’ power of discrimination between main land use types. Variability within LSU depended on the biological indicator and was generally higher in grassland than in cropland soils. Each site could unambiguously be assigned to its landscape unit based on its calculated comprehensive score. Radar plots allowed an assessment of the distribution of values within a landscape unit at a glance. Conclusions. The pilot-study defined the first baseline values for agricultural soils in Wallonia and laid the foundation for a monitoring network of biological soil quality. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of the Potential Role of Streptomyces in Cave Moonmilk Formation
Maciejewska, Marta; Adam, Delphine; Naomé, Aymeric ULiege et al

in Frontiers in Microbiology (2017), 8

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See detailSoil organic carbon fractionation for improving agricultural soil quality assessment – a case study in Southern Belgium (Wallonia)
Trigalet, Sylvain; Chartin, Caroline; Krüger, Inken ULiege et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2017), 21(S1),

Description of the subject. The paper presents and discusses a method for fractionating bulk soil organic carbon (SOC) in meaningful SOC fractions to better assess SOC status and its related soil ... [more ▼]

Description of the subject. The paper presents and discusses a method for fractionating bulk soil organic carbon (SOC) in meaningful SOC fractions to better assess SOC status and its related soil ecosystem functions. Objectives. The objective is to perform an evaluation of ecosystem functions of soil organic matter at plot scale and compare it to the normal operative range of the local agro-ecological region. Method. By separating carbon associated with clay and fine silt particles (stable carbon with slow turnover rate, < 20 μm) and carbon non-associated with this fraction (labile and intermediate carbon with higher turnover rates, ≥ 20 μm), effects of management can be detected more efficiently at different scales. Conclusions. Soil organic carbon fractions, used as proxies for soil ecosystem functions, can be helpful because they represent SOC functional pools. This paper proposes to apply fractionation on samples taken at plot and regional scale. It is therefore possible to establish a normal operative range for a specific agro-region for comparison with the values in individual plots. This allows drawing a baseline for SOC fractions status in a specific agricultural unit. This approach provides valuable information to study and evaluate the impact of agricultural management in the context of enhancing soil quality and functions. [less ▲]

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See detailIntegrating biological indicators in a monitoring network to improve soil quality diagnosis – a case study in Southern Belgium
Krüger, Inken ULiege; Chartin, Caroline; van Wesemael, Bas et al

Conference (2016, July 21)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (4 ULiège)
See detailStocks de Carbone Organique et des incertitudes
Chartin, Caroline; Krüger, Inken ULiege; Carnol, Monique ULiege et al

Conference (2016, July 05)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (1 ULiège)
See detailL’intégration d’indicateurs biologiques dans un réseau de surveillance des sols afin d’améliorer le diagnostic de la qualité du sol – une étude de cas dans le sud de la Belgique (Wallonie)
Krüger, Inken ULiege; Chartin, Caroline; van Wesemael, Bas et al

Poster (2016, July 05)

Les organismes du sol et leurs activités sont essentiels pour le fonctionnement de l’écosystème du sol et ils peuvent donc servir comme indicateurs de la qualité du sol. Des efforts ont récemment été ... [more ▼]

Les organismes du sol et leurs activités sont essentiels pour le fonctionnement de l’écosystème du sol et ils peuvent donc servir comme indicateurs de la qualité du sol. Des efforts ont récemment été menés pour intégrer les indicateurs biologiques de la qualité du sol dans les réseaux de surveillance régionaux/nationaux. Le but de cette étude était de déterminer des gammes de valeurs pour six indicateurs biologiques et deux quotients éco-physiologiques pour les sols agricoles. La respiration potentielle, la biomasse microbienne (carbone et azote), la minéralisation nette de l’azote, la diversité métabolique des bactéries du sol, l’abondance des vers de terre, le quotient microbien et le quotient métabolique ont été mesurés dans 60 sites dans des régions agricoles contrastées (différents types de sol et climat) et différentes utilisations de sol (prairies et cultures) sélectionnés d’un réseau de surveillance du carbone organique du sol (CARBOSOL). Les liens entre indicateurs biologiques et paramètres chimiques (le pH du sol, carbone organique total, soluble, labile et stable) sont analysés. Quatre des six indicateurs biologiques sélectionnés (respiration potentielle, biomasse microbienne (carbone et azote) et diversité métabolique des bactéries du sol) sont significativement plus élevés sous prairies que sous cultures. Les gammes de valeurs sont plus larges sous prairies que sous cultures. Les indicateurs biologiques sélectionnés ne sont pas significativement influencés par la région agricole. Les meilleures corrélations avec les paramètres chimiques ont été trouvées pour la respiration potentielle et la biomasse microbienne (carbone et azote). L’étude définit des gammes de valeurs pour les sols agricoles à l’échelle régionale (Wallonie) séparées par utilisation de sol (prairies et cultures) et présente une base solide pour l’établissement d’un réseau de surveillance de la qualité biologique du sol. [less ▲]

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See detailPrésentation du projet CARBIOSOL: « Développement d’indicateurs de la qualité biologique et du carbone organique des sols agricoles en Wallonie »
Chartin, Caroline; Krüger, Inken ULiege; Carnol, Monique ULiege et al

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

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See detailMetal binding to the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain of the PIB ATPase HMA4 is required for metal transport in Arabidopsis.
Laurent, Clémentine ULiege; Lekeux, Gilles ULiege; Ukuwela, Ashwinie A et al

in Plant Molecular Biology (2016), 90

PIB ATPases are metal cation pumps that transport metals across membranes. These proteins possess N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic extensions that contain Cys- and His-rich high affinity metal binding ... [more ▼]

PIB ATPases are metal cation pumps that transport metals across membranes. These proteins possess N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic extensions that contain Cys- and His-rich high affinity metal binding domains, which may be involved in metal sensing, metal ion selectivity and/or in regulation of the pump activity. The PIB ATPase HMA4 (Heavy Metal ATPase 4) plays a central role in metal homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana and has a key function in zinc and cadmium hypertolerance and hyperaccumulation in the extremophile plant species Arabidopsis halleri. <br />Here, we examined the function and structure of the N-terminal cytoplasmic metal-binding domain of HMA4. We mutagenized a conserved CCTSE metal-binding motif in the domain and assessed the impact of the mutations on protein function and localization in planta, on metal-binding properties in vitro and on protein structure by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. <br />The two Cys residues of the motif are essential for the function, but not for localization, of HMA4 in planta, whereas the Glu residue is important but not essential. These residues also determine zinc coordination and affinity. Zinc binding to the N-terminal domain is thus crucial for HMA4 protein function, whereas it is not required to maintain the protein structure. <br />Altogether, combining in vivo and in vitro approaches in our study provides insights towards the molecular understanding of metal transport and specificity of metal P-type ATPases. [less ▲]

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See detailBiotic homogenization can decrease landscape-scale forest multifunctionality
van der Plas, Fons; Manning, Pete; Soliveres, Santiago et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016), 113(13), 3557-62

Many experiments have shown that local biodiversity loss impairs the ability of ecosystems to maintain multiple ecosystem functions at high levels (multifunctionality). In contrast, the role of ... [more ▼]

Many experiments have shown that local biodiversity loss impairs the ability of ecosystems to maintain multiple ecosystem functions at high levels (multifunctionality). In contrast, the role of biodiversity in driving ecosystem multifunctionality at landscape scales remains unresolved. We used a comprehensive pan-European dataset, including 16 ecosystem functions measured in 209 forest plots across six European countries, and performed simulations to investigate how local plot-scale richness of tree species (α-diversity) and their turnover between plots (β-diversity) are related to landscape-scale multifunctionality. After accounting for variation in environmental conditions, we found that relationships between α-diversity and landscape-scale multifunctionality varied from positive to negative depending on the multifunctionality metric used. In contrast, when significant, relationships between β-diversity and landscape-scale multifunctionality were always positive, because a high spatial turnover in species composition was closely related to a high spatial turnover in functions that were supported at high levels. Our findings have major implications for forest management and indicate that biotic homogenization can have previously unrecognized and negative consequences for large-scale ecosystem multifunctionality. [less ▲]

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